RN to BSN...worth it?

  1. I'm considering finising up my BSN right after I graduate with my ADN in May. Is it worth it? I feel so burned out on school right now, but I know if I don't do it now I probably never will.

    Those of you who have your BSN, what do you feel it has added to your nursing career? Is the pay raise (which I understand is miniscule) enough to compensate for the big $$$ it costs to finish school?

    I'd love to have your input....
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  2. 9 Comments

  3. by   GGingerSR
    I was having the same problem as you. Trying to decide when to start the BSN was a hard decision that took me several months. I finally decided to wait. I have two wonderful children that have had to sacrifice for me to go to school. I am taking a year off and spend some quality time with them. I would also like to have some experience in nursing before I start. My instructor said that there are lots of papers to write and maybe experience will help. As for you listen to your heart. If you want it bad enough you will go back if you wait. If family is not a problem, than go for it. My understanding is that the BSN is more for nurses who want management positions or want to get their Masters. That is what I want one day. Nurse Practioner has a good ring to it.
  4. by   traumaRUs
    I did my BSN completion when I had been a nurse 9 years - only for my own satisfaction. However, if you choose to work in a Magnet hospital, a BSN is needed for anything other than a staff RN.
  5. by   kahumai
    Jen, it depends on where you want to work and what you plan on doing. I'm continuing on for for Master's immediately following my BSN (somewhere between right away and 2 years later), so it was mandatory for me to have a BSN. You're right about the pay difference being very slight, but keep in mind...there's a hospital by me who only hires BSN's or higher...no diplomas, no ADN's. I don't know how common that is, but you may find this at other hospitals, too. Just something to think about...
  6. by   Ginyer
    At the hospital I'm going to school thru, the BSN nurses make 25 cents more per hour.

    Ginyer
  7. by   kenni
    depends on what you want to do. most adns will say "no", but there are obviously some benefits to having a bsn, otherwise they would have phased out a long time ago. in my geographic region every nursing school has an rn-bsn or lvn-bsn track, so that says a lot of adns and lvns notice the differences and are wanting to go back and further their educations. i'm just a nursing student and my clinical instructor last semester also taught an adn class and told us that she expected and required more of us since we were going for the bachelor's. down here i've seen many positions (outside of traditional bedside nursing) that all require that you have at least a bsn. these areas include management, research, education, pharmaceutical companies, and community settings. not to mention if you ever wanted to get a master's you'll have to complete that step first.
  8. by   Blackbird
    Hi there. Non American here.
    I'm assuming ADN means Associate Diploma in Nursing and that a BSN is Bachelor of Science (Nursing).

    In Australia, we cannot work as registered nurses without a degree. A diploma will get us registration as an enrolled nurse but that's it. An associate diploma will land us as an nursing assistant, down another level again.

    A degree would be something to consider should you wish to work overseas.
  9. by   TexasCCRN
    It totally depends on what you want to do. If you want to move up the ladder at all you need your BSN. If you even think about going back to school....get your BSN now. I was as burnt as you are when I finished school and now i am going back for my masters....it was nice that I didn't have do do a bunch of extra work before I applied to grad school. I think more education shows that you want to learn more, be better and provide better care to your patients whatever type of education it may be. Good Luck
  10. by   shyne
    I am because I plan to further my education.
  11. by   nurse2be2007
    Quote from Blackbird
    Hi there. Non American here.
    I'm assuming ADN means Associate Diploma in Nursing and that a BSN is Bachelor of Science (Nursing).

    In Australia, we cannot work as registered nurses without a degree. A diploma will get us registration as an enrolled nurse but that's it. An associate diploma will land us as an nursing assistant, down another level again.

    A degree would be something to consider should you wish to work overseas.
    Actually its Associate Degree in Nursing not Diploma. The diploma nursing programs are taught directly through a hospital and they are considered RN's as well. Here we have CNA's which are certified nursing assistants, and PCT which are patient care tech's. These postions usually allow for hands on training or I have seen 7-8 week training sessions then you can sit for a test to get certified.

    I personally am doing the ADN first because I am paying out of pocket for my education and I cant afford the high prices of a University right now. I figure after I get my ADN, RN and start working in a hospital, the hospital will help with tuition to continue my education and get my BSN. It works out better for me this way, but if I could afford a University I would have just went for my BSN.

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