Power points in nursing school? And number? - page 2

Hello, all! For those currently in nursing school or have recently graduated, how many power points did you guys typically print out? Did instructors make the slides seem like you were in medical... Read More

  1. by   Beldar_the_Cenobite
    Quote from HappytobeARNP
    The other thing that really helped me was recording lectures (get permission first). I would listen to the lectures during my drive home and during any down time.

    Recording is nice. That's what I do for biology classes so far. What I used to do was print out the slides in black and white and recording and try and pay attention to the instructor. Then when I had to take a chem class at a univeristy that was expensive AF, I figured out how to write down the times the instructor moves to another slide. I call it Blackboxing.

    So if you were an instructor and were fine with recording, I'd print out your power points in color, double sided, frameless, and fit to page. The first slide that had information you started on it like "types of white blood cells" and you had a list and each with a function I would write the time we start by looking at the time recording. So if you were talking about the las vegas shooting for 5 minutes and you moved on to the lecture at excactly 5 minutes and 45 seconds into the lecture, I'd write that above the first slide. As you were talking and went to the next slide, the minute you hit the button to go to the next slide, I would look at the time you did it and write it at the side of the slide we were just on on the side followed by an arrow moving in the direction of the next slide we're about to be on. So that way when I get home, I'll know where I am if there's a particular slide I'm stuck on cause our A&P teacher always tells us "study what you don't know, not what you know".


    Black boxing is very tedious unless you can pay attention and listen and look at the recording time each time they go to the next slide but it's very helpful. I can't do either anymore. I just let her talk and pay most attention to the recorder when I see a slide move. But I think I'm getting in the hang of all of it again because I got a B- on cardiovascular exam and I'm not happy about it.

    Black boxing also helps because if you're studying really hard and still don't understand something, you can share the lecture where you're stuck at with a tutor or the teacher in their office hours and go over it with them.

    I call it Black Boxing after the black boxes used in aircraft that monitor every second taking place a plane is flying doing something. If the plane goes down, investigators can go back to the events of the crash and see evrything recorded and how everything happened. So I do the same with this. I'm tired during lecture, crashing, and I go home and investigate the lecture lol
  2. by   Beldar_the_Cenobite
    Quote from HappytobeARNP
    Most of my professors used Power Point and I would take notes on my laptop as they taught. The other thing that really helped me was recording lectures (get permission first). I would listen to the lectures during my drive home and during any down time. Lastly, active learning allows more retention than passive so rewrite your notes by hand in your own words.

    I hope these things help.
    Best wishes!
    I hope this comes out. The numbers on the top of my slides with the arrows and the "starts @" is my technique called Blackboxing. If you do this for all your classes that involve power points, and the teacher is ok with recording, and you study your stuff, this will be very helpful. You're keeping track of the entire lecture. you don't see your lecture but you know where you are. I don't think it came out right. You'll have to open the image in a new tab to fully see it.
    img_5979-jpg
  3. by   Beldar_the_Cenobite
    Quote from wannabeny
    I didn't print my powerpoints. There were 300+ per class. I would look at each powerpoint, and then in word processor, and make a table of all the topics listed in the powerpoint, my reading list, and my modules.
    Wow! That's a lot of power points lol
  4. by   Beldar_the_Cenobite
    Quote from PudgeMC
    We have 30-80 per set of slides, but have 3-5 sets per week. Most of them are "voiceover," so the author of the PPT talks during each slide. I learn by writing, so I take notes on every slide prior to class and then take additional notes during class. You can put the PPTs in the cloud and read them from your phone or iPad.
    That doesn't seem too bad. I think that's what we have so far for my last A&P class. The voiceovers....UGH....I had those for my nutrition class and they were not helpful. The instructor that I had used voiceovers from a previous instructors and not her own. #LAZY! The previous instructor's voice in the power points didn't really explain the slides, just read off them like an audiobook. It sucked. Like what am I, 9? lol I don't have a reading disability, you're just saying what is on the slides, not explaining them.
  5. by   Beldar_the_Cenobite
    Quote from PudgeMC
    We have 30-80 per set of slides, but have 3-5 sets per week. Most of them are "voiceover," so the author of the PPT talks during each slide. I learn by writing, so I take notes on every slide prior to class and then take additional notes during class. You can put the PPTs in the cloud and read them from your phone or iPad.
    Quote from HappytobeARNP
    Most of my professors used Power Point and I would take notes on my laptop as they taught. The other thing that really helped me was recording lectures (get permission first). I would listen to the lectures during my drive home and during any down time. Lastly, active learning allows more retention than passive so rewrite your notes by hand in your own words.

    I hope these things help.
    Best wishes!
    My teacher is full of herself and she'll start talking about her personal life. Sometimes when it gets too much, I'll write "starts BS'ing @ -:--" and then when she's done "Stops BS'ing about her personal life @ -:--" and when I go back and listen to the recordings, my little notes will tell me what to do or where to go. What was really annoying was when instructors would go back to slides repeatedly and I would have to note in the slide what time it was they did that. Recently I would speak into the recorder instead of writing it because writing does kinda take forever and if I speak it I saved myself time from writing and my attention from the lecture cause writing takes away your attention. Doing it while looking up is difficult.
  6. by   Beldar_the_Cenobite
    For teachers who don't want to be audio recorded, I thought about using my dedicated recorder, taping it underneath my desk, and using those little clicking devices coaches use to count a lap for runners and click it near the recorder every time the instructor moves on to another slide. Then I would re-listen to the recording providing I didn't forget it before leaving class and write down the clicks I heard time intervals unless I noted they went to another slide to show something and then return to the one they were lecturing. That's if they use power points. When I took statistics, we didn't use power points, so whatever he wrote or told us to write where ever, I would write the time on the side of it. Oh yeah, he allowed recording, so I wrote the time down based off where we were but it was kind of difficult because I was so used to PP.
  7. by   studentbear
    Quote from Beldar_the_Cenobite
    For teachers who don't want to be audio recorded, I thought about using my dedicated recorder, taping it underneath my desk,
    Our med surg professor forbids us from recording and she informed us that if anyone did record her, they would be going against the honor code and there could be some pretty serious consequences. Just some food for thought.

    As far as the ppt count, I've noticed this semester (I'm in my second semester) that the ppt count is usually around 80 slides per class. I print out the ppts with 3 or 6 to a page and handwrite notes on the slides. Lots of other classmates take their laptops to class and type notes instead.
  8. by   Lipoma
    I'm currently in an accelerated program and my campus' printer broke within 3 weeks haha.

    I just printed out a 124 slides powerpoint for my pathophys class. Mind you, this is separate from the 50 slides powerpoint I had to print today....this class is twice a week.

    I print all of my lecture slides out 4 slides per page, landscape layout, and in black and white. I'm on my 3rd ink cartridge and I'm only in week 8.
  9. by   Orion81
    Quote from Okami_CCRN
    I never printed power point slides; instead I would bring my laptop to class and type up my notes within the power point program. The cost of ink and environmental factors of utilizing so much paper were a huge deterrent to printing.
    That's exactly what I did.
    It also made it easier to slip in your own notes on your word doc when the instructor says simething worth noting. Its faster than hand writing it out.

    Most of us students recorded the lectures as well.
  10. by   Shawn91111
    I do 3 slides per page, front and back so usually ends up around 18-20 pages per lecture, 14 lectures so around 275-300 pages when all is said and done. No laptops or Tablets allowed, and we would be kicked out of the program if found recording the lectures.

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