Is It Possible To Work During Nursing School? - page 3

by TheCommuter Asst. Admin

21,980 Views | 44 Comments

Students commonly ask variations of the following questions: “Is it possible to work while enrolled in the nursing program at my school full-time?” “Should I work while attending nursing school?” The answer is not a clear-cut... Read More


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    Very interesting and informative topic. I start my first semester of an ADN program and plan on working full time (48 hrs) a week. However the type of job is a major factor. I am a firefighter EMT so I'm fortunate enough to have a set Friday/Saturday schedule, but I'm nervous about only having Sundays off to spend with my wife and child. However I know my wife and I would struggle financially if I don't work. And depending on my shift, my "day off" be spent in bed half the time. Good luck to you all.
    EmilyA likes this.
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    As others have said in this thread, choosing to work during nursing school is very much a personal choice. There are many factors involved in deciding to actually work during nursing school. In my case, I had to continue working full-time while going to school full-time as well. Fortunately, I work a shift that allows me to go to school during the day and work in the evening, but not overnight. I'm also able to study at work as well. Another major issue in whether or not a person is able to work full-time and go to school full time is the educational background of the student. In my case, I am not having to learn an entirely new body of knowledge. I have an extensive body of knowledge in medicine already, so all I have to do is integrate the new information from nursing school with existing knowledge I have. That alone makes a big difference in how I am able to study and how much I need to study during the week.


    Also, precisely because of my extensive background coming into nursing school, I tell my fellow students that they should not study in the same way that I do. When I study, I look for differences between nursing and my pre-existing body of knowledge, and integrate the two where as other students having to create an entirely new body of knowledge would have to read and assess all of the information that they are given.


    So really, to sum it all up, going to school and working, even part-time, is entirely a personal decision based on a number of factors that were touched on in the original post in this thread. Time management, study skills, finances, support, all of those things all play a role in that decision. I am looking at approximately another year of school before I am done. This is not going to be easy, but it is doable if everything works out according to plan. And you know what they say: no plan survives contact with the enemy. In our case, the enemy is everything that can derail our ability to continue with school.
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    When I was in college for my BSN RN degree many years ago 1985-1989 I worked as an CNA. I worked in a nursing home sophomore year then junior year I secured a position in the SICU CT/GS at a big Philly University hospital . It was my ticket yo the success I have today in my profession . I learned everything during those years about being a successful nurse and how to time manage your shift ect. I didn't work full time during the semesters but at least 16 hours a week. After I graduated I accepted a job in the SICU as a GN and passed the boards mom problem thanks to that experience during college. I went on for my MSN Nurse Practitioner degree a few years later and haven't looked back! Nursing has been a very rewarding and challenging profession for me. I couldn't imagine doing anything else !! Good luck all!
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    It's tough but managable.
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    kudos to all of you, but I have actually found that I can't do both. I'm not good at juggling many things at once and I have some ADD so I get easily distracted plus some anxiety so nursing school + 25 hrs a week of work completely stressed me out and I had to quit my job. Some people can do it, but it's not for everyone.
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    Working and going to school can certainly be a science in itself. I work 36 hrs (3 12hr shifts Mon Tues Wed) and I am also doing RN to BSN online and sometimes the way is rough, but what you accomplish in the end will be worth it. I also worked 3 12 hr shifts a week different days while acquiring my ADN. Sacrifices must be made by all family members to be successful, for example eating more sandwiches, sharing the housework etc. As I stated above what is accomplished in the end is well worth it and will be beneficial to the whole family. Good luck!
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    Great article!!! I'm finishing up my ADN in May and have worked through the program, mainly because I didn't have any other options. It's definitely do-able so don't listen if someone says it's impossible - it'll suck for sure but it's not impossible! A point worth mentioning in terms of coping with distractions (last point in the article) is that if you are at all able to get a job as a CNA/PCT, that's best for nursing school. During the first year or so of school, I transitioned to a new (part-time) position in the office I had worked in full-time for about 2.5 years (totally unrelated to healthcare), and it's been difficult to switch gears constantly from thinking about school to thinking about work. As a PCT, everything you are learning is 100% applicable once you finish school. About 4 months ago I started working PRN as a PCT and I'm going to part time next week & quitting my office job... could not be more relieved!
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    Quote from Lolita34
    I will be starting a BSN program in August and I am very nervous about not being able to work. I am an elementary school teacher now and I'm doing my best to save as much as I can to get through the first semester or two without working. Thankfully my husband is supportive but we have three kids. I just want to make sure financially we will be ok. The posts on AN really helps me to see that it can be done.
    Can I ask what made you want to switch from teaching to nursing?

    I worked 2 nights a week as a CNA (8 hour shifts) for my LPN. For my RN I worked full time nights (5 8 hour shifts). It was brutual but I pulled through. I will be starting my BSN in the fall and I plan on working full time (3 12 hour shifts a week, nights) which shouldn't be too bad. The program I'm doing is all online.
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    Quote from DizzyLizzyNurse
    Can I ask what made you want to switch from teaching to nursing? I worked 2 nights a week as a CNA (8 hour shifts) for my LPN. For my RN I worked full time nights (5 8 hour shifts). It was brutual but I pulled through. I will be starting my BSN in the fall and I plan on working full time (3 12 hour shifts a week, nights) which shouldn't be too bad. The program I'm doing is all online.
    Nursing was my first career choice but circumstances didn't allow me to pursue it. I like the hours and time off from school but I need a change. I love the opportunities nursing has to offer as far as the many different fields to work in. Sometimes I wonder if I am doing the right thing but I will never know unless I try.
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    That's a really splendid article because there are many students who think the same.
    Last edit by TheCommuter on Jan 18, '13 : Reason: edited


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