Pick Your Battles Wisely - page 3

by TheCommuter Asst. Admin

5,468 Unique Views | 28 Comments

Life is not fair, and neither is nursing school. After having dealt with various sticky situations while attending an LVN program, and later, an RN bridge program, here are my blunt two cents on this matter: suck it up, choose... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from Saysfaa
    A question, though.... do you know if the clinical hours were shorted just the once or regularily. Also, if it was once, did the clinical program have a few extra hours built into it? I'm asking because despite an excessive amount of hype about how absenses of any sort were unacceptable, it turned out that it was very unusal that not a single student missed a single clinical hour - so we met the allotted hours requirement before the end of the last day and were legitimately sent home early. Although, the instructor did explain why.
    The clinical hours were being cut short on a regular basis by this one particular instructor. Since this was a second job to earn some extra money, he did not really put his entire heart and soul into the task of teaching.

    It took place in the state of California where approximately 954 clinical hours are required prior to completion of an LVN program. The nursing program was set up for exactly 954 clinical hours, so any students who were absent or late had to make up the time.

    This particular instructor was cutting clinical days short for his own convenience without notifying the school's administration, so he was basically falsifying records through omission (re: not revealing he was ending the clinical shifts early).
  2. 0
    Thank you for the article! This is essentially the advice I was given by a recent grad just before starting my program.
  3. 0
    its so true, u have to know what battle's u want to fight or not. SO WHAT the teacher sent u home early, go spend ur extra time studying in the library, or volunteering at a hospital or nursing home gaining some experience, with human interaction and communication.. picked a fight with a teacher and u lost. I NEVER tried that in nursing school, and i walked out unscathed, no failing grades or failed classes. the teachers are the boss and ur the student. thats just the way it is
  4. 1
    If you watch Weeds, Mahalia James says "Fair is what you pay on the bus." I keep that in mind in my nursing school experience. Sometimes it's little things like such and such clinical group got to do this and we didn't, or someone performed their skill in front of this instructor who was more exacting. Get. Over. It. There is no way that your experience is going to be exactly the same as everyone else's. Your job is to get through, not quibble over one or two points.
    bbuerke likes this.
  5. 4
    Quote from TheCommuter
    The clinical hours were being cut short on a regular basis by this one particular instructor. Since this was a second job to earn some extra money, he did not really put his entire heart and soul into the task of teaching.
    This is a widespread problem, the pink elephant in the room that no one wants to acknowledge. I was a clinical coordinator for a short time, and I would hear officially (but mostly non-officially) that certain CIs always let their students out early. Part of my job was to evaluate the CIs, as well as the facility (was the unit the right fit for the level, etc). There were ones that I purposely went to later in the shift, after being tipped off. And sure enough, there were a couple of times where the group was MIA. Either never showed up, left early, or no one has seen the group in weeks. When my boss approached the CIs, there was always an excuse (Oh, I took them to a specialty unit this week, they stayed late last week, so I let them out early, or a bunch of other nonsense that could not be confirmed or denied). The bottom line was this: The CI was not reprimanded because a) no student would rat her out, either for fear of repercussion (which I totally understand, from their perspective), or b) the students were HAPPY to be getting out early, or c) we were so desperate for CIs. Sad, but true.

    Choice B (as stated above) was a real, legitimate thing in this setting. I was so embarrassed to be a part of an institution that would accept this type of mentality, much less having colleagues that would enable it. One of the full timers there adjuncted at another institution, where students complained about her because she never let them out early. Are you kidding me!! How on earth do you go to a higher up with a complaint like that??

    I am at a different institution now, and it's not all roses there either. But I keep my mouth shut when I hear of other groups who have the 'day off', or alternate arrangements have been made. I am not a coordinator, so it really isn't my business. So I stay out of it. There are times where my group has had alternate arrangements made, all on the up-and-up. I don't have to answer to anyone except my coordinator, my chair, and my conscience

    I am wondering if the student mentioned in the OPs scenario was one who was not part of that mentality, therefore it was maybe her word against the rest of the group?

    I hate to hear about all the underhanded things that go on in out profession. But, it happens in every aspect of life.
    cp1024, bbuerke, x_factor, and 1 other like this.
  6. 0
    Quote from ProfRN4
    This is a widespread problem, the pink elephant in the room that no one wants to acknowledge. I was a clinical coordinator for a short time, and I would hear officially (but mostly non-officially) that certain CIs always let their students out early.
    Thank your very much for providing your perspective as a nurse educator and a formal clinical coordinator on this sticky issue. I think we really needed to hear from someone who works in higher education.
  7. 1
    Quote from amoLucia
    .

    And secondly, is there not any type of 'whistleblower' protection against retaliatory actions available??? After all, we are talking about institutions that may be Civil Service, and/or those who are probably receiving some federal-type funding, be they grants, scholarships, work programs, student loans, etc.
    I believe that kind of protection is only valid towards an employer.
    TheCommuter likes this.
  8. 0
    I completely agree with this article wholeheartedly. Nursing school is a microcosm (sp?) of the real world and nursing environments in general. Bottom line, I am entering my senior year of my 2 year ABSN program and to be quite honest myself and all my classmates have come into contact with some of the worse professors you can imagine. What makes it so bad is they have been receiving failing grades, reviews, and comments from people for several years but yet continue to keep their job because they are in good standing with the Dean of the Nursing program.

    To make matters worse is we are taught the material from the book, learn it from the slides, then the professor turns around and contradicts the book even though she/he is clearly wrong. It really does affect the student because these professors make me second guess recommending this program (which I would never do), coming back here to pursue my Master's Degree (if I decide to take that route), and donating to the program.

    This is why I have such a hard time undertanding students who want to be the teacher's pet and dont' realize the same way you are sucking up that can easily get you caught up. I had to learn the hard way how students snitch, teachers play favorites, and in the end we all get got in some way

    Sometimes it is just best not to rock the boat, suck it up, and move on with life. I got less than 8 months to go until graduation. I can make it
  9. 2
    I wonder why the failed student didn't get staff on the ward where the students were leaving early to verify their departure time. I also wonder about the Dean to whom this illegal behavior was reported. What did the Dean do, Commuter?

    It's definitely true that we have to be careful who we take on as opponents. Pitiful state of fallen Man. Come quickly, Lord Jesus, and right all wrongs.
    Juryizout and cp1024 like this.


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