Pharmacology expectations

  1. 0
    My pharmacology teacher is frusteratingly vague about her expections or objectives and I'm worried I won't be prepared when I get to clinicals, my integrated practicum, or eventual job.

    What are these "drug cards" that students from other programs talk about?
    If you're mentoring someone in clinicals or their first job, what to you expect them to know?
  2. Get the Hottest Nursing Topics Straight to Your Inbox!

  3. 2,578 Views
    Find Similar Topics
  4. 7 Comments so far...

  5. 0
    If your classmates all agree that she is not clear, and the syllabus does not outline expectations, then talk to the instructor and tell her just that. I would make an appointment. Ask her if she can recommend any study aids. She may think she is communicating well enough.
  6. 0
    Drug cards are often assigned to students to help them learn. They have the generic drug name, brand name, class, indication, mechanism of action, PK/PD, contraindications, ADR, and any monitoring/ toxicity.

    As far as your first clinical? I would expect a student to look at the med list and then look up info on any med they are giving: what the drug is for, if its a safe dose, and any potential ADR. I wouldn't expect them to know it all from memory.
  7. 0
    Can you give us more information? Do you have a separate pharmacology practicum or are you preparing for another course's clinical? I certainly won't presume to take the place of your pharm instructor, but I expect my students to know the following information about a medication prior to administration: ordered and normal dosage, route of administration, any preparation (ex- does the medication need to be diluted? If it is IV push, over what time should it be given, etc), what the medication is for, when the medication is ordered, any side effects,does it interact with anything they are taking, and how the student will know the medication is working (or not working). Also, be sure to check your medication rights each time, verify your patient's identification at bedside, identify yourself, wash hands, etc.

    Again, I can't speak for other instructors, but students get nervous. I expect them to be able to know the information, but they can look at their cards/drug book/smart phone drug app for guidance. They get nervous and it takes time. As the previous post stated, most instructors don't expect you to memorize it all!

    In general for pharm, know the nursing process. Example- what assessment findings might show a need for the medication? What nursing diagnoses might the patient taking this med have? What are your goals for the patient? What interventions are most important? How will you evaluate if the medication is working? Also add in any signs of toxicity and safety issues and patient education.
  8. 0
    Thank you. I'm in a ABSN program and we have two terms of Pharm. our clinicals this term are mostly in sim lab but next term will be out in the "real world" (not that clinicals are the real world exactly!). Many of us have expressed our frustration to the prof, to the Dean, to the course director... Our pharm prof is nice and trying hard but is new to the program and learning herself. We are happy to work harder--we all basically expected to give up life as we know it for the next 16 months to do nothing but study, reflect and study-- we just want some better direction. Thank you for your comments. A wider net of feedback of what people outside my program might expect is helpful for me to know where to set my own study bar.
  9. 1
    My students also have a simulation component to their course. In preparation for most sims, I want them to apply information. For example, let's say your patient is asthmatic. How would you know (assessment findings)? Let's say you give them an albuterol treatment via a prn order. What findings led you to give this prn med? Is the order safe? Any contraindications? What short term and long term goals could I make for this patient? What education should I provide? What are the top things I should do to help my patient? How will I know if the plan is working or not? What are basic safety concerns for this med? Etc. I hope this helps some.
    medic9872 likes this.
  10. 0
    Thank you. I've taken to over-studying everything and am getting to know my drug guide well. The instructor is getting clearer about expectations and senior faculty has been getting more involved in the class. As a cohort, we're sharing resources well and certainly learning a lot. Thanks for the feedback! It's been helpful.
  11. 0
    Quote from AOx1
    Can you give us more information? Do you have a separate pharmacology practicum or are you preparing for another course's clinical? I certainly won't presume to take the place of your pharm instructor, but I expect my students to know the following information about a medication prior to administration: ordered and normal dosage, route of administration, any preparation (ex- does the medication need to be diluted? If it is IV push, over what time should it be given, etc), what the medication is for, when the medication is ordered, any side effects,does it interact with anything they are taking, and how the student will know the medication is working (or not working). Also, be sure to check your medication rights each time, verify your patient's identification at bedside, identify yourself, wash hands, etc.

    Again, I can't speak for other instructors, but students get nervous. I expect them to be able to know the information, but they can look at their cards/drug book/smart phone drug app for guidance. They get nervous and it takes time. As the previous post stated, most instructors don't expect you to memorize it all!

    In general for pharm, know the nursing process. Example- what assessment findings might show a need for the medication? What nursing diagnoses might the patient taking this med have? What are your goals for the patient? What interventions are most important? How will you evaluate if the medication is working? Also add in any signs of toxicity and safety issues and patient education.
    Great tips! Thank you


Top