PDA software - what to buy?

  1. I would like to buy some PDA software ready to start my ADN in August, but am getting quite confused by the selection available out there. What would be the 5 most useful titles you could recommend and why?

    I am already a bit disappointed - finding that I could have bought some of my text-books as PDA options (RNotes, Davis's Drug Guide etc) which would have been much more useful than having to haul all those books around, so I might just have to purchase those twice, and then sell my books. I wish I'd known!!

    I want to buy the most comprehensive software for each subject, and don't want to mistakenly buy software that overlaps with information I've already got in another package. Thanks
    Paint
    •  
  2. 4 Comments

  3. by   Altra
    My top choices would be (and have been! ) the Davis Drug Guide, RNotes & Taber's Med. Dictionary. See skyscape.com.

    JMO, but I found that these 3 "translated" well to the PDA. I suppose it's possible to convert any text to PDA software but you have to think about how you're going to use it. Traditional subject matter texts are what you spend the time reading at home and are too detailed for quick reference - and quick reference is primarily what you use the PDA for. I probably won't purchase any additional software until after graduation when I see where I'm working and what types of patients, then I'll have to decide if there's other software that would be useful.

    Hope this helps!
  4. by   mjbsn2006
    What's the best type of PDA to have? I was overwhelmed when I was searching online. Do many electronic stores sell them? Has the PDA really been useful to you during nursing school? Thanks!

    Quote from MLOS
    My top choices would be (and have been! ) the Davis Drug Guide, RNotes & Taber's Med. Dictionary. See skyscape.com.

    JMO, but I found that these 3 "translated" well to the PDA. I suppose it's possible to convert any text to PDA software but you have to think about how you're going to use it. Traditional subject matter texts are what you spend the time reading at home and are too detailed for quick reference - and quick reference is primarily what you use the PDA for. I probably won't purchase any additional software until after graduation when I see where I'm working and what types of patients, then I'll have to decide if there's other software that would be useful.

    Hope this helps!
  5. by   Altra
    Quote from mjbsn2006
    What's the best type of PDA to have? I was overwhelmed when I was searching online. Do many electronic stores sell them? Has the PDA really been useful to you during nursing school? Thanks!
    Has it been useful? Well, there was the day my instructor asked to borrow it for a sec ... :chuckle

    Yes, absolutely it's very useful, especially the drug guide. No matter how you prep for your clinical patient assignment, it's very common to come in the next morning (or right after the doc has written new orders) and find that you've got new meds to give, and you have to look them up before you give them. Also, it's a little *challenging* as a student to keep all 15 possible side effects of each of the 20 meds your patient is taking in your head - very helpful to take a quick peek. I'm learning new terminology by the day, but at this point it's also essential that I have a medical dictionary too. And the RNNotes program has tons of reference info, including common lab values, and is just plain cool, too. I've seen several nurses who use them frequently.

    As far as PDAs, well, we could debate the Palm vs. Windows topic all day - that's a personal choice. Take a look at electronics stores (Best Buy, etc.) and office supply stores (Office Max, Staples, etc.)

    Happy shopping!
  6. by   EyesForward
    I love my Taber's Medical Dictionary, and before you buy a drug guide try Epocrates. It's free, and it's awesome.

close