Only charting? - page 6

I'm a first year nursing student and to be honest, the majority of what I've seen nurses do is charting and give meds. Is this all I will do?... Read More

  1. by   future_nurse_d
    Quote from Lightning90
    Sometimes i feel like nurses think they are the ****. Like ooo i just got through nursing school, it was the hardest thing EVER (lmao). And than here they are doing things at work that a regular person could do (fetching water, bed baths, cleaning up). And when a problem arises, its not even in your scope to treat it! Lol. Thats why i said youre like a waiter (a messenger). In my eyes nurses do all the boring work that comes along in health care. Oh i forgot to add, the pay is ****.
    Are you in nursing school? If so, do us all a favor and drop out stat. Seriously.
  2. by   chacha82
    I am grateful for the times I have had enough spidey sense on a patient to get their assessment in before they started going south.

    Perhaps to you, the student, it seems like we are just passing meds, charting, "being waitresses." It won't feel like that when you come on and ED wants to call report, your assignment includes an ICU transfer who probably never should have left, someone had a transfusion reaction a few hours before you got them, the PICC line won't pull, you have q 6 dressing changes needing to be done NOW and family is upset. You will have to do all of that and more, in addition to making sure your charting is all updated. Sadly if you didn't chart it, it never happened.
    Last edit by chacha82 on Jan 7
  3. by   Extra Pickles
    Quote from Niquolea26
    Thank you, I think I just had a lousy first clinical experience. There were two nurses that were phenomenal but the others....I had no clue what a fire this would light or else I probably would have kept my mouth shut...
    I’m glad you did say something! Your questions are perfectly normal and it’s important to find out that what you’ve experienced isn’t all that there is to nursing. If you didn’t ask you wouldn’t have found out all that you did on this thread, it’s important to you as a student to know what’s ahead and it’s important to us as experienced nurses to know how we seem to you. It might not change everything that everyone does but it might make us take a minute to explain something further regarding what’s happening if a student seems to be thinking “nothing is going on”, you know?

    Never let someone who is foolish or arrogant stop you from asking questions. It only enhances your learning experience and points out the foolishness of others who are too arrogant to even ask the questions. Kudos to you for asking!
  4. by   la_chica_suerte85
    Quote from Lightning90
    Yeah i just got done with my first clinical semester and i noticed this to.. Nurses spend a significant amount of time just handing out meds... And documenting... And doing boring ass stuff. However i knew going into nursing school that I didnt want to be a bedside nurse... Youre literally a waiter is how i see it. Ive seen nurses fetching pitchers of water for clients. Smh. For all the knowledge you have...
    Can I downvote this?

    "Fetching" that water is an important opportunity for assessment. For me, it's a good time to catch up on I/Os and it might also clue me in on how a pt who previously was barely tolerating their clrs is now able to consume a normal amount without barfing it back up. It's an opportunity for teaching my DI pts on their water goals if their sodium levels start creeping back up. Any interaction with a pt is a nurse assessing and....AHEM....using the knowledge I have. SMH, indeed.

    That's fine you don't want to be a bedside nurse but whatever you do end up finding yourself doing, please make sure you have the background to know what you are talking about when it pertains to all the things nurses do. It might seem mundane to you but you truly haven't starting thinking like a nurse yet and hopefully you eat your words someday soon.
  5. by   future_nurse_d
    Quote from la_chica_suerte85
    Can I downvote this?

    "Fetching" that water is an important opportunity for assessment. For me, it's a good time to catch up on I/Os and it might also clue me in on how a pt who previously was barely tolerating their clrs is now able to consume a normal amount without barfing it back up. It's an opportunity for teaching my DI pts on their water goals if their sodium levels start creeping back up. Any interaction with a pt is a nurse assessing and....AHEM....using the knowledge I have. SMH, indeed.

    That's fine you don't want to be a bedside nurse but whatever you do end up finding yourself doing, please make sure you have the background to know what you are talking about when it pertains to all the things nurses do. It might seem mundane to you but you truly haven't starting thinking like a nurse yet and hopefully you eat your words someday soon.
    I am sure they will. Apparently this person wants to be an NP. LOL. Good luck with that attitude.
  6. by   emily34812
    Wow that is a very sad way to view nursing. You do not see all they are thinking about and doing. And it's interesting to me you want to be a nurse but think you're above getting water for a patient that is relying on you.
  7. by   sv12b
    I agree with both. When I was a student I didn't see all the 'cool stuff'.... what I didn't know was that when that nurse was handing out meds they are assessing the patient....are they swallowing ok, reacting appropriately, any changes to cognition, any swelling, are they speaking in full sentences, are they wincing when they move.....
    I didn't notice the nurses assessing skin integrity when they bed bathed, or checking if the body is limp or rigid, noticing a fever....
    I didn't see when they wrote their contemporaneous notes they were checking things off, doing their A-Gs over and over in their head looking for signs of deterioration....and if there are signs what have they done, what is next....
    I remember when I was a new student thinking vital signs were boring! I promise an exsanguinating pt, a septic pt, an airway obstruction, an arrest....vitals are very important, but by the same token, a good nurse can often catch a decline early.

    I remember once when writing my starting progress notes just before meds..... I needed to look at the patient's potassium level.... Not only was it 6.2mmol but the patient had been chartered for KCL PO TDS and given it the past 3 days. The patient also had a cardiac hx and recently started on ACE inhibitors....

    Now student nurses.... ask yourself what my boring charting and meds process did for that patient.....
    Last edit by sv12b on Jan 8 : Reason: Poor grammar
  8. by   sv12b
    Such a good description, felt like I was at work just reading it!
  9. by   sv12b
    That's okay, you're clearly just one of the students that doesn't notice very much. But we RNs notice the students who don't notice things.... and we let your facilitators know.... who let your university know. Your placements will be boring and you won't get a critical care rotation at the end... because patients lives depend on you noticing more and being able to think.
  10. by   Julius Seizure
    Quote from sv12b
    That's okay, you're clearly just one of the students that doesn't notice very much. But we RNs notice the students who don't notice things.... and we let your facilitators know.... who let your university know. Your placements will be boring and you won't get a critical care rotation at the end... because patients lives depend on you noticing more and being able to think.


    It's okay because she is a new student in her first clinical semester and learning the observation skills of a nurse is literally what you are in school for. If you already knew everything on day 1, you wouldn't need to go to school. OP is probably a fine student and will learn as she goes through her program and graduate with as much ability as any of us had as new grads. For goodness sakes.
  11. by   Extra Pickles
    Quote from sv12b
    That's okay, you're clearly just one of the students that doesn't notice very much. But we RNs notice the students who don't notice things.... and we let your facilitators know.... who let your university know. Your placements will be boring and you won't get a critical care rotation at the end... because patients lives depend on you noticing more and being able to think.
    I really hope you are not talking to the OP. I hope you are referring instead to the NP-wannabe. The OP, the person who posted this thread deserves our support. The other one, not so much.
  12. by   RescueNinjaKy
    On a side note, once had a schizophrenic patient. Got him some water, and he poured it out. Requested bottled water. Add that on to the rest of my assessment, I could tell that his paranoia was getting worse. Well just like how I am "just a nurse" I was definitely "just fetching" water and not assessing his psychosocial wellbeing at that time.

close