Nursing Students Shafted - page 3

After reading several messages here I've come to the conclusion that we nursing students have to work twice as hard as someone who is getting their degree in another field like accounting, computers,... Read More

  1. by   Roland
    I once took a Calculus class and spent at least three hours per day (more on the weekends) plus lecture time. I'm weak in math so it was absolute torture for me to understand and apply those concepts at an "A" level. Damm near drove me to give up school.
    However, a friend took the same class with me and found it to be incredably easy. Of course he's a Physics professors now....
    Last edit by Roland on Nov 2, '02
  2. by   Peeps Mcarthur
    Originnaly posted by Thendar:

    While your list of accomplishments is most impressive, I was comparing 2 year degrees. I agree with you that at a university level computer science is quite rigorous, but at the community college level I could get a degree in computers in my sleep
    Funny you should mention that paticular sleep disturbance.

    I think the NANDA referrence would be:
    Sleep disturbance; osmotic acquired degree :roll

    R/T unemployed, desparate, instructor candidates who teach courses for which there are virtualy no employment opportunities.

    Actions:

    Assess the pt for close proximity to a community college where on-line courses are offered.

    assess for certain risk factors:
    Take home assignments, extra credit reports,exam questions match the study guide.

    ALERT:
    exam questions are answered by following rules of operation(math) or other linear thought and are therefore driven into the pt with great osmotic pressure while sleeping.

    {END SMARTASS COMMENTS}

    Just had to comment. I started out getting a CS degree, but changed my mind when I discovered that it was an endless journey of getting certified in this and that and that new "must have" certifications at obscene course fees are continualy pumped out by the industry.
    Last edit by Peeps Mcarthur on Nov 4, '02
  3. by   inocentangl22
    I agree, I have been in school for almost two years and the only thing I have done is general ed. The classes that they aare using for entrance into the Nursing Program have nothing or VERY little to do with my major!
  4. by   beaRNwhenIgroUP
    Originnaly posted by Thendar:


    I think the NANDA referrence would be:
    Sleep disturbance; osmotic acquired degree :roll

    R/T unemployed, desparate, instructor candidates who teach courses for which there are virtualy no employment opportunities for.

    Actions:

    Assess the pt for close proximity to a community college where on-line courses are offered.

    assess for certain risk factors:
    Take home assignments, extra credit reports,exam questions match the study guide.

    ALERT:
    exam questions are answered by following rules of operation(math) or other linear thought and are therefore driven into the pt with great osmotic pressure while sleeping.

    now that is FUNNY stuff!!! :roll
  5. by   MidwifeWannaB
    I'm about to start a 2-year nursing program, and after I graduate I plan to go back and get my BSN after I have kids. The problem is that the word "STATISTICS" scares the H*** out of me. I know this class is hard and I'm at least 4 years from having to take it, but I'm still curious as to what is involved in this class, and since y'all are all talking about smart classes like underwater basket weaving I figured y'all could help me out. Thanks!
  6. by   kimmicoobug
    Here is my response to this thread and it is totally based on my own personal experience. I think nursing school is extremely difficult, but not in the matter of concepts. When I first started school, I did have difficulty grasping the nursing process and nursing diagnoses, but as I have become familiar with them, they are cake. BUT, that is just me. The material we cover is not that hard to me. We are required to write papers, and I can do that fairly easy. What makes this hard is managing my time when I have a case study due on Thursday (5 or 6 pages) clinicals on Tuesday and Wednesday, compentencies due on Friday, plus two kids and a husband. But put me in a field that requires math more difficult than algebra and I am a fish out of water. This does not lead me to say that nursing is easy. It isn't. I still sometimes have trouble figuring out why a particular lab value is the way it is, or why a patient could be on a particular med. But, in the end each and every person is different and their perceptions are different. For example, my husband can't do the nurse thing. His niche in the world is computers. For him, it is super easy. For me, that is a different story.

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