Nursing School Probs

  1. I need help guys. You know the struggle of instructors being so hard on you and it makes you fearful. One mistake and it's like your never gonna be a good nurse. I'm in my second year and there expectations is higher. Lately I've been having high acuity patients and its kinda hard dealing with patients and showing ur instructors you are good nurse when your being greatly challenged all the time. I focus so much on the big things sometimes I forget the little things , like bringing a cup of water for meds and forget to bring a saline flush,etc it's like because my instructors are so strict it make me so fearful and therefore I have no confidence within myself. I need more positive than negative vibes. I do well in class just Clinicals kinda gets under my skin cause my instructors don't provide the best environment of learning cause they make me so fearful of them. I need tips on how to overcome this.
    Last edit by nurseboy12396 on Feb 1
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  2. 22 Comments

  3. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from nurseboy12396
    I need help guys. You know the struggle of instructors being so hard on you and it makes you fearful. One mistake and it's like your never gonna be a good nurse. I'm in my second year and there expectations is higher. Lately I've been having high acuity patients and its kinda hard dealing with patients and showing ur instructors you are good nurse when your being greatly challenged all the time. I focus so much on the big things sometimes I forget the little things , like bringing a cup of water for meds and forget to bring a saline flush,etc it's like because my instructors are so strict it make me so fearful and therefore I have no confidence within myself. I need more positive than negative vibes. I do well in class just Clinicals kinda gets under my skin cause my instructors don't provide the best environment of learning cause they make me so fearful of them. I need tips on how to overcome this.
    OK, where to start.

    Nursing is a high stress field. You are going to have to learn to deal with pressure and stress and still keep your mind on your work and on doing a good job.

    You are an adult. It is your responsibility to learn the material. It would be wonderful if we all got a chance at a paragon of nursing instruction who created a comfortable, nurturing atmosphere with nothing but "good vibes", but there aren't enough of those paragons to go around. You get the nursing instructor you get, and you either choose to learn from them or choose not to because the vibes aren't positive enough for you.

    It is up to you to develop self-esteem, self-confidence and courage.

    Strict instructors may be uncomfortable to deal with, but they prepare you for the realities of the job far better than someone whose main concern is creating positive vibes.

    I'm surprised your classroom instructors haven't said anything about your spelling, grammar and punctuation because those things are important, too.
  4. by   Sour Lemon
    Quote from nurseboy12396
    I need help guys. You know the struggle of instructors being so hard on you and it makes you fearful. One mistake and it's like your never gonna be a good nurse. I'm in my second year and there expectations is higher. Lately I've been having high acuity patients and its kinda hard dealing with patients and showing ur instructors you are good nurse when your being greatly challenged all the time. I focus so much on the big things sometimes I forget the little things , like bringing a cup of water for meds and forget to bring a saline flush,etc it's like because my instructors are so strict it make me so fearful and therefore I have no confidence within myself. I need more positive than negative vibes. I do well in class just Clinicals kinda gets under my skin cause my instructors don't provide the best environment of learning cause they make me so fearful of them. I need tips on how to overcome this.
    I tend to focus on the actual message someone is delivering as opposed to how that message makes me feel. Maybe that would be a useful approach for you, too.
  5. by   brownbook
    I am always forgetting the little things, after 36 years of nursing. I joke to my patients and co-workers about how many times I have to make repeat trips to the nurses station for little things l forget. I do it on purpose to get more exercise. NOT!

    Take a deep breath. Pause before you prepare for a procedure and think....ok what am I forgetting. Even think of me, goofy Brownbook, a deep breath and a chuckle can be very helpful when you're stressed.
    Last edit by brownbook on Feb 1
  6. by   futuremurse93
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    OK, where to start.

    Nursing is a high stress field. You are going to have to learn to deal with pressure and stress and still keep your mind on your work and on doing a good job.

    You are an adult. It is your responsibility to learn the material. It would be wonderful if we all got a chance at a paragon of nursing instruction who created a comfortable, nurturing atmosphere with nothing but "good vibes", but there aren't enough of those paragons to go around. You get the nursing instructor you get, and you either choose to learn from them or choose not to because the vibes aren't positive enough for you.

    It is up to you to develop self-esteem, self-confidence and courage.

    Strict instructors may be uncomfortable to deal with, but they prepare you for the realities of the job far better than someone whose main concern is creating positive vibes.

    I'm surprised your classroom instructors haven't said anything about your spelling, grammar and punctuation because those things are important, too.
    Wow, could you be any harsher? Not even remotely helpful.


    For the OP: Dont be afraid to ask for help. Sometimes you feel like you are drowning all by yourself but your classmates are going through the same thing. You can't be expected to improve if you don't know HOW to improve. So utilize what resources your school has, watch youtube videos on anything you are struggling in, and maybe ask your instructor for advice. I get flustered sometimes too when I am nervous and I find that it is much easier when I am prepared. So, I do meticulous steps before I am going to do something like med pass so that I have everything I need right there with me.
  7. by   nursej22
    OP, your instructors are obligated to be strict, clinical time is limited and they are responsible to several students. If they have to watch several students pass meds and your forget the water cup or saline flush, then that potentially makes another pass late.

    My suggestion is practice, practice, practice! Use your school's practice lab, or pass meds to your teddy bear, so that the steps become smooth and second nature. I used to use the analogy of learning to drive. When you first learn, all the small steps can seem overwhelming , but with experience and yes, practice, it gets easier.
  8. by   caliotter3
    If you have to, make yourself little cheat sheet lists for your pocket. I'll bet it won't take long to find you no longer need the lists.
  9. by   Mavrick
    Quote from futuremurse93
    Wow, could you be any harsher? Not even remotely helpful.
    For the OP: Dont be afraid to ask for help. Sometimes you feel like you are drowning all by yourself but your classmates are going through the same thing. You can't be expected to improve if you don't know HOW to improve. So utilize what resources your school has, watch youtube videos on anything you are struggling in, and maybe ask your instructor for advice. I get flustered sometimes too when I am nervous and I find that it is much easier when I am prepared. So, I do meticulous steps before I am going to do something like med pass so that I have everything I need right there with me.

    Have you taken or passed NCLEX? You don't sound like it and your previous posts indicate you haven't.

    At some point you may have to take Ruby Vee's advice too, because it's pretty right on.
  10. by   emmjayy
    Quote from Mavrick
    Have you taken or passed NCLEX? You don't sound like it and your previous posts indicate you haven't.

    At some point you may have to take Ruby Vee's advice too, because it's pretty right on.
    Since when has taking the NCLEX been a prerequisite to being allowed to have an opinion about things people post in the student forum?
  11. by   AnLe
    Just breathe and relax. Write down the meds of the patient at the start of clinicals, perform your head to toes before them (optimally), and have the vital signs available. Before you leave, go over your 5 P's (or however many there are). I tried to ensure they had water at the bedside and a cup, so when I did go with meds, I knew that was already taken care of.

    If you ever need saline flushes, go over the procedure in your head. If the patient doesn't have continuous IV fluids running and is saline locked, you will need 1 to flush to check patency, and another for after the med is administered. Make sure you get the correct saline flush that you need (actually picked up a 3ml once and not 10ml).

    It's all about time management. Try to have a goal for specific times as needed.

    Side note: I always preferred the teachers who got after me and explained stuff to me. I always seemed to remember them the most and their lesson. (ABCD's - Drains, drips, and disability.)
    Last edit by AnLe on Feb 3 : Reason: Spelling
  12. by   Mavrick
    Quote from emmjayy
    Since when has taking the NCLEX been a prerequisite to being allowed to have an opinion about things people post in the student forum?
    I was referring to the advice Ruby Vee was giving that the working world is more similar to what the hard/strict nursing school instructor was trying to teach than an instructor giving off nothing but good "vibes"

    futuremurse appears to have no real world experience thus has no standing in being critical of Ruby's advice (calling it harsh and not remotely helpful.) I was questioning that the ADN and 1 years experience as it appears on the poster's profile is misleading.
  13. by   Irish_Mist
    What I find helpful when I am preparing to go to a patient's room is to do a visual check of my supplies. Do I have enough flushes? Do I have enough alcohol pads, the glucometer, lancets? Do I have the humalog and an insulin syringe (if the patient does indeed need insulin coverage)?

    Every time you go into a patient's room to perform some sort of task or assessment, do a mental check off of what you need. That's called clustering your care and it will save you so much time.

    Lastly, DON'T worry about your instructors. They are there to teach you how to be a competent nurse, not be your cheerleader. Focus on the task at hand and not on your fear of your instructor.
  14. by   wannabeny
    They need to be strict. It is an unfortunate aspect of the way our schools are structured; we are taught alot of information with a short amount of time. Have to hit the ground running.

    As long as you are doing well overall, don't sweat the small things. They want to make sure you are safe, know when to ask for help, and learn how to handle multiple patients.

    They aren't there to make you fearful, but humble. People lives depend on us squashing the butterflies and unclouding our minds to practice safely.

    Can you find family to help you study? I always liked practicing my skills on family members. I would give them a list of what I needed to perform the skills and they would critique me. Always keepd it fun trying to see how they'll pronounce certain medical terms as well

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