Nursing 101 Question - How would you answer this? - page 3

Your patient just returned from having a cast set on their left arm. Your patient complains of worsening pain 30 mins after rec'g pain medication. What do you do? A. Elevate the patients arm... Read More

  1. by   julsywulsy
    Great reply! Good info..thanks for all your replies! I do appreciate it!
  2. by   SoulShine75
    Quote from julsywulsy
    Your patient just returned from having a cast set on their left arm. Your patient complains of worsening pain 30 mins after rec'g pain medication. What do you do?

    A. Elevate the patients arm with pillows and apply an Icepack.
    B. Offer them a cup of hot tea.
    C. Call the Doctor and send for the cast-cutter.
    D. Divert their attention from the pain with conversation.

    How would you answer this question, based only on the information given? Please explain your rationale.

    Thanks!
    C ........sounds like compartment syndrome to me because the pain medication isn't having an effect. Get that cast off now!!
  3. by   GracieLVN
    This is a classic question relating to compartment syndrome. My answer would be C. Anytime there is a newly placed cast with pain that is unrelieved by medications, it is most likely compartment syndrome. Elevating the arm and adding an ice pack would futher impede blood flow. :spin:
  4. by   sephinroth
    I would say that the answers are none of the above. If a patient tells you something is wrong, the first thing you need to do is to assess again, am i right?

    After further assessment, you can determine if the patient has compartment syndrome(i dont even know what that is until i read it here) and then call a doctor with a cast cutter.
  5. by   cardiacRN2006
    Quote from sephinroth
    I would say that the answers are none of the above. If a patient tells you something is wrong, the first thing you need to do is to assess again, am i right?

    After further assessment, you can determine if the patient has compartment syndrome(i dont even know what that is until i read it here) and then call a doctor with a cast cutter.
    Well, that's why it is a nursing school question--you don't always get the answer you want. I could think of a few better answers. But then, that would be to easy, and would nix the whole 'critical thinking' portion of the exam.

    BTW, you did re-assess. 30 minutes after pain med administration, you re-assessed and found worsening pain.
  6. by   Curious1alwys
    Uggggh. I hate NS questions.

    Sometimes you read into the question too much....according to your instructor.

    Sometimes, the question seems simple but you didn't read into it (or critically think) enough......according to your instructor.

    Sometimes, it really is simple but you are reading into it too much....

    Plus, factor in questions that ARE poorly worded cuz let's face it...we are only human....even the writers of the NCLEX questions...

    Trick is....pray to God you actually learn something in NS, answer the stupid questions, and walk out happy with a 76% and DON'T THINK ABOUT THE QUESTIONS AGAIN. IT WILL DRIVE YOU ABSOLUTELY BATTY!!! In test review, if you answered one way and the instructor says it is wrong for X reason (but you still have a very strong argument that you are right) just smile and say "OK". That is when he will probably say, "Well, you are right, but so is this". :smackingf

    You just can't win em all. Just 76% of them. (or whatever)
  7. by   smkiya
    Quote from julsywulsy
    Your patient just returned from having a cast set on their left arm. Your patient complains of worsening pain 30 mins after rec'g pain medication. What do you do?

    A. Elevate the patients arm with pillows and apply an Icepack.
    B. Offer them a cup of hot tea.
    C. Call the Doctor and send for the cast-cutter.
    D. Divert their attention from the pain with conversation.
    When a patient has a cast and has pain unrelieved by medication, you should immediately consider compartment syndrome. By delaying treatment for compartment syndrome you risk significant neurologic dysfunction to the affected extremity.

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