Needs HONEST answer, huge dillema! - page 2

I have searched high and low for an honest unbiased answer, to no avail. I need to get started on becoming a nurse. I've started at a community college last week, but was accepted to a real... Read More

  1. by   RedSox33RN
    I would go to the university also. There will never be a better time, and will only get more difficult as you get older.

    I've had to put off going back to school for a long time due to being a mom of 4, but I had to realize there will never be a great time. Yes, I'm going to miss out on things for a couple of years, but that's the price myself and my family have to pay for myself trying to better our lives.

    Best of luck to you, in whatever you decide!
  2. by   CarVsTree
    For entry level nursing positions, it does not matter whether you have an Associate's or Bachelor's degree. Difference in pay $1.00 if at all. At least that's the most I've heard of.

    I am going for my Associate's because if I could not afford to go for my Bachelor's. We have a very limited time that I can be working part-time and going to school because of a Mortgage and other bills. By getting my associate's first, I am able to work after two years. Also, I have a scholarship through a local hospital. After I finish my nursing internship at this hospital, I will go on and get my Bachelor's.

    A Bachelor's degree opens a world of possibilities for other jobs in nursing, such as educator, case manager, and supervisory positions. It also enables you to go on for Master's level positions.

    If I were 18 and it was affordable, I would go straight for my Bachelor's. It definitely depends on your financial situation. Do what is best for you.
  3. by   actioncat
    There is absolutely no difference when it comes to getting hired as a staff nurse. Some hospitals pay a premium for a BSN (perhaps because they won't have to pay for this extra schooling later?), but it is minimal.

    I was kind of in the same shoes as you--- except I was trying to decide between an LPN program at the local adult ed center and the BSN program at the state university. I am glad I went with the BSN program, because I got it all done.

    If you had kids/financial issues I would say go for the ADN. I'm sure it is a good program.

    Please do not listen to the myth that BSNs are mostly for people interested in "going into management". This is just not true. I did not know a single person who got a BSN because they wanted to make sure their options were open to management. In fact, I've never heard a BSN educated nurse say this. (That doesn't mean none do, it is just not as common as some would have you believe) I have heard a few say they wanted to go into community health or wound care and needed a BSN. Also, don't worry about clinical. You will get just as much as the associate's program or more.

    But.. you can get into a master's program with an associates. There are many RN to masters programs out there.
  4. by   alintanurse
    True! It's usually easier to complete your education when you have less responsibilities.
  5. by   jenrninmi
    Hi there,

    Just like comparing any two programs, get information about them both. Which has more clinical hours? Who has the highest retention rate? Who has the highest NCLEX exam pass rate? I personally like being in a BSN program. I already have an AS, so that was one factor, the ADN program here has a few year waiting list, where the BSN program doesn't have one. My BSN program admits 64 students 3 times a year, I think the ADN program is only once a year and I don't know how many they admit. My program is outrageously expensive especially compared to the ADN program of course.

    Well, good luck in your decision! Let us know what you choose!
  6. by   jenrninmi
    [QUOTE=actioncat]Also, don't worry about clinical. You will get just as much as the associate's program or more.

    QUOTE]

    This is true. I have more clinical hours it seems than many adn students on this board.
  7. by   Gompers
    I wouldn't worry about things like clinical hours and nursing classes - of course those things will vary a little bit. But those will always vary from school to school, whether the programs are BSN or ADN. The biggest difference is that with the BSN you're going to have a more rounded education that includes much more than nursing and science classes. When I went to college, I wanted to get right to the nursing classes, too, but now that I look back I'm thankful I did choose the BSN route. I have a minor in psychology, took a half dozen mind-twisting philosophy and theology classes, read some amazing literature, and dabbled in some minor computer programming. Probably the most interesting class I took in school was this history course that focused on the history of science - everything from the Plague to pasturization to antibiotics to nuclear weapons.

    Look at the big picture, and go with your gut feeling.
  8. by   jenrninmi
    Quote from Gompers
    I wouldn't worry about things like clinical hours and nursing classes - of course those things will vary a little bit. But those will always vary from school to school, whether the programs are BSN or ADN. The biggest difference is that with the BSN you're going to have a more rounded education that includes much more than nursing and science classes. When I went to college, I wanted to get right to the nursing classes, too, but now that I look back I'm thankful I did choose the BSN route. I have a minor in psychology, took a half dozen mind-twisting philosophy and theology classes, read some amazing literature, and dabbled in some minor computer programming. Probably the most interesting class I took in school was this history course that focused on the history of science - everything from the Plague to pasturization to antibiotics to nuclear weapons.

    Look at the big picture, and go with your gut feeling.
    Me too. I'm really happy I'm going the BSN route for some of the same reasons. I loved my literature classes, Anthropology, Psychology, Spanish...
  9. by   meesa214
    At 18...definitely get your BSN. The whole college experience of living on campus and all that goes along with it can never be recreated. This is really the only time you will be able to do that. I will cherish those memories forever from when I got my Bachelor's degree (not in nursing though). I decided a few years later to go back to school and now I'm getting my ADN.
  10. by   FocusRN
    This is simple, I can't see why you haven't been able to fing an answer. The difference between an ASN and BSN is that with a BSN can come higher positions (and you can get a masters if you want), and in most places a BSN will also get you a higher income. A lot of people go for an ASN first because they can start working asap, so that y the time they get their BSN, their pay will not only be based on their degree but experience as well. If all you want to do is be an RN, and don't care aout the raise in pay go for ASN, but if you do care about higher pay and position gor for ASN then BSN. I have seen alot of people go straight for BSN and come out of school lost, so no matter what I would go for ASN first.
  11. by   jenrninmi
    Quote from New_Mom_LPN_Student
    . I have seen alot of people go straight for BSN and come out of school lost, so no matter what I would go for ASN first.
    What do you mean by this statement? I don't feel I'm going to be "lost" when I graduate with my BSN. Can you explain what you're talking about?:uhoh21:
  12. by   Nurse Ratched
    Mod note: PLEASE let's not turn this into an ADN vs. BSN thread (the snippy kind.) Thanks .
  13. by   PhoenixGirl
    I have speant hundreds of hours since then looking for an honest answer and an honest person. Can somebody please tell me which is the right route?

    The right route, and the right answer is only for you to decide. Everyone chooses different programs for different reasons. I chose an ADN program because I want the fastest route to be an RN. I then want to work and slowly do a BSN and try for employer tuition reimbursement as that BSN degree will be more expensive.

    Well, if the AS program is so great and wonderful, than why would you even WANT to get a BA.

    Eventually I would like to go to grad school when my kids are older. I need a Bachelors for that. I also like that BA's have more opportunity for advancement. In my area, it is also easier to get into a bridge program than the BSN program. I'd be waiting longer to get into ASU's BSN program, plus it's more competitive because of seating...whereas the ADN program in my county is VERY good & easier for me to get into.

    I want to know, if I get a AS degree will I find a good job?

    Where I live (phoenix) i've been told the As is very marketable, and they make good money. If you are in Cali, I hear it's the same way.

    And money is no option for me, neither is time. I am only 18, so I have plenty of time. I just want to get a GOOD job, and not be stuck with a useless degree.

    An ADN is not a useless degree. It is in high demand in many areas. Although if you think it is useless than I would say you have already answered your own question. And I can't really give you an unbiased opinion, only tell you what I would do. If I didn't have kids, and had way more time to dedicate to school, I'd certainly go with the BSN first. Just to get it out of the way. But since I have kids, and the CC program is much closer to my house, the daycare is right across the street, and it's much cheaper, that is what I'm going with.

    Rebecca

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