More jobs as BSN?

  1. Hello everyone! Another quick question. Do BSN's have more job opportunities than ADN's. I'm not really talkings about money, but where you can work. I'm close to getting into a ADN but if I wait a year I can do a BSN. Is this worth it in the long run!
    Thanks for any advice!
    •  
  2. 11 Comments

  3. by   BMS4
    There are more opportunities for BSN nursing, mainly in management. Not necessarily in bedside nursing.

    I am a ADN RN working toward my BSN. I recieved my ADN last year, have worked a year and will continue to work while I'm working on my BSN. There are two pluses to doing it this way: 1) My ADN degree was cheaper than getting a BSN. 2) I am working as a RN while getting my BSN. I'm making what BSN nurses are making and I will end up with the same degree but spending less money in the long run.

    Good luck with your decision and enjoy school.
  4. by   Cynthiann
    I'm doing the same thing - getting my ADN first before my BSN because it will cost much less. There are more opportunities as a BSN as the previous post mentioned but there are still plenty of jobs out there that don't require a BSN. It really depends on your goals and how quickly you want to attain them - if you want to get into management or get an advanced degree you will eventually need a BSN.
  5. by   marilynmom
    Like Cynthia I am working on my ADN and then will continue with my BSN.

    It really depends on what kind of nurse you want to be. Some nurses needs advanced degrees (nurse practitioner, CRNA, CNMW, etc) and also management and maybe teaching as well.

    Usually people get there ADN first because its cheaper and both BSN and ADN make the same salaray starting out.

    M
  6. by   Caitlin's Mommy
    I'm pretty much agree with everyone here.I'm working on my ADN and then I'm going to work on my BSN because it will be aleast 15,000 dollars cheaper for me.Plus I'll have the experiance I need alot sooner for the masters program I want to get into.
    Where I live most RNs are paid the same and have the same number of job opportunities.

    Unless you want a management position or get your master degree you will have to have a BSN.Or at least thats how it is where I live.

    Good luck to you what ever you decide.
  7. by   zambezi
    I think that it also depends what job you want to do. As others have mentioned, if you want to do management, BSN is necessary (at least where I live). BSN also necessary for education positions (hasn't been in the past but now they will only hire BSN). In the critical care area that I work in, BSN graduates or RNs are looked at first, which is then weighed with experience, etc...I got my BSN right out of school, so I didn't have any kids/husbands, etc to worry about. In my area, BSN and ADN degrees make the same amount of money but there has been some talk about changing that (though the majority of RNs at the hospital overall are ADN degrees, so I don't think that it will pass if we vote...) Advanced degrees, as you probably know, also require a BSN...As far as general job opportunities, there are definately enough to go around, it just depends what you want to do!!! Good luck in your decision....
  8. by   vaughanmk
    I went ahead and got my BSN first. I found that on the floor and RN is an RN. No matter what the education level is, diploma, ADN , or BSN. Like stated above it's only when you get off the floor that it makes a difference. Many hospitals will not hire an ADN to be a unit manager, but a NH will. The BSN is great for research and education purposes.
  9. by   KristinWW
    From my own experience as an outsider, I have found the level/quality of care to be the same for RNs/BSNs on the floor. In fact, I received the best care after my deliveries from the LPNs (thank you to the wonderful LPN who fixed a ginger drink for me when no one else made me feel better after serious complications ) Again, as an outsider, I see more BSNs in management.
  10. by   angelbear
    I have my LPN and am working on my ADN. Eventually I would like to go for the BSN as I would eventually like to be involved in nuero research. That said most RN's around here have lots of job ops in many different area's but then this is a rural area. But even as an LPN I think I make pretty dang good money though I dont have any bennies. I think the LPN to RN to BSN also gives you a wide variety of experiences. Good luck in your education.
  11. by   JudithL_in_NH
    A lot of folks on this board (me included) have previous BAs or BSs from former careers.

    Does anyone know if an ADN with a bachelors in another field is considered for management positions/nonbedside positions in the same way a BSN would be? How do you "stack up" with an advanced degree that's not in nursing?
  12. by   Jennerizer
    That is a good question Judith....I don't know the answer though. I am curious to find out. I have a bachelor's degree in business. Perhaps things will change as the shortage continues to worsen with the baby boomers getting ready to retire.

    I have also heard that if one plans to go for a master's degree after getting a BSN, that it is wiser to get it in anything but nursing. That an MSN doesn't get you any further in pay or in nursing...but a masters in business or a masters in hospital administration, etc. is far more beneficial than a masters in nursing. I guess it all depends on which aspect of nursing you want to go into.
  13. by   iliel
    Thanks everyone for the advice. I have made my decision. I am going to go ahead and take 3 more semesters of pre reqs to recieve my BSN. After much research I found that the school I want to transfer to dosn't allow any pre req to be over 5 years old. If I do an ADN now, my grad date would be '06 and that puts me at 5 years to the date! There's always the chance that something won't transfer, then I'll have to take something over and lose perfectly good pre reqs. I'm lucky enough to be in a situation where 3 more semsesters will be ok!
    Thanks again and good luck to all of you with whatever programs you choose!
    Iliel

close