Memory

  1. Are there any students who have a poor, I mean poor, memory? What if I can't remember names of medications and whatnots? I did well in pre-reqs, but once the tests were taken it was gone from my brain. I am really getting nervous about being able to retain this stuff.
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  2. 9 Comments

  3. by   2ner
    Quote from studentNY
    Are there any students who have a poor, I mean poor, memory? What if I can't remember names of medications and whatnots? I did well in pre-reqs, but once the tests were taken it was gone from my brain. I am really getting nervous about being able to retain this stuff.
    Nursing school is COMPLETELY different than your pre-req's were. You are no longer memorizing stuff, because the tests are application tests. You really have to know the info and be able to apply it. I miss being able to memorize info for the tests and then forgetting everything. You just have to hone your study skills and figure out how you study best to RETAIN the info. Try getting "You are smarter than you think" and figure out what type of learner you are. You may have to take refer back to it periodically (as I have) to pick up on new ways that may be helpfull.

    Good luck!
  4. by   purplemania
    most of us cannot remember EVERYTHING we would like to remember. Keep a drug reference close by. Our medication carts have one attached to the cart and we have online access too. The drugs you administer most often will be etched into your brain. The rest, well, they are always changing so you have to have good resources.
  5. by   2ner
    Quote from purplemania
    most of us cannot remember EVERYTHING we would like to remember. Keep a drug reference close by. Our medication carts have one attached to the cart and we have online access too. The drugs you administer most often will be etched into your brain. The rest, well, they are always changing so you have to have good resources.
    I agree 100%. You start linking the meds to your patients (ie dig and insulin will be ingrained in your brain b/c you'll forever remember the first time you've administered either of them) - you'll be able to remember the exact time, place and person with whom u were taking care of b/c you'll remember how nervous you were and what the outcome was. With each med admin you'll pick up new memories. The drugs you administer frequently will be easy to remember. For the others, just do what purple said, consult your drug reference book. That's one of the two books i DO take to clinical with me (the other one is either a small med-surg book or a small OB book)
  6. by   EyesForward
    Learn in frequent, small doses rather than stuffing too much info in your head at once. Write, then review your own flashcards until you pass the NCLEX. If you're not memorizing something chances are you don't understand it. Strive to understand it first, memorize second.
  7. by   belladelicious
    You will remember it. The only way to retain info for the long term (like your final, or the nclex) is to review old material! I never did that until I started nursing school.

    Review some study skills material. And, as far as drugs, that's hard for everyone. Sure, you can memorize it for the test and do fine, but if you don't review it (just once a week), you'll forget it. I know I do. Just review old stuff, not study hard. Do it watching tv. You'll be fine! It's not that bad.

    You don't have a poor memory. We were told we'd be carrying around a drug book our first years as nurses. Make flashcards, and make sure you study everyday.
  8. by   opalmRN
    I totally agree with the previous posts.

    Application is the key to remembering for me. As far as carrying a drug book around for a year, the seasoned nurses at my site still pull the med book and I am glad. Better to be humble and admit we don't "know all" than possibly put a patient in danger.

    One other point I would like to share. You will become more knowledgeable in your area of concentration. Think of it this way. In all professions there are so many areas that few people are experts in all. In teaching, a high school chem. Teacher can spout off any chemical sign you ask but is very likely weak in the English lit area. Nurses are no different. You will be proficient in your area.

    Hang tough!
    Last edit by opalmRN on Jun 11, '04 : Reason: opps, spelling
  9. by   PCGrad06
    this is my worry too. i hope i can remember when and how to apply the knowledge!
    Quote from studentny
    are there any students who have a poor, i mean poor, memory? what if i can't remember names of medications and whatnots? i did well in pre-reqs, but once the tests were taken it was gone from my brain. i am really getting nervous about being able to retain this stuff.
  10. by   Energizer Bunny
    I worry about my memory too.......after three kids it's no where near as well as it was when I was in school previously. My dh thinks I've lost my mind, cuz he'll tell me something and I cannot remember it five minutes later!
  11. by   Audreyfay
    I'm just worried about forgetting my name. My nursing co-workers have this ongoing conversation about us all being in the same nursing home together. One will be a screamer, one will be taking off their clothes, and I figured I'd be the pincher and groper.

    Regarding memory, you can only do the best you can. Use the reference materials you have. If on the floor you forget, make sure you have the reference books nearby. Who can fault you for having to look something up? Even the doctors look things up.

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