MA saying she's "the same as an RN" - page 3

At my job, we are offered classes each month for our CEU's as LNA's. We were at one the other day for some psych training, and we were asked what we wanted to be doing in 5 years. Myself and... Read More

  1. by   gauge14iv
    In Texas, only a licensed nurse can use the title nurse - but you will still hear MA's do it.
  2. by   Jessy_RN
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    Someone should point her in the direction of her state board's website, which CLEARLY states they are NOT the same.

    Either that or someone will rip her a new one for having that line of thinking.
    LOL! So true
  3. by   Fun2, RN, BSN
    Quote from gauge14iv
    In Texas, only a licensed nurse can use the title nurse - but you will still hear MA's do it.
    I thought it was illegal to represent yourself as an RN, not 'nurse'?

    Even still, I know I wouldn't rush up to the scene of an accident and say, "I'm a nurse. What can I do to help?"

    I'd say, "I'm a medical assistant, can I help in any way?"
  4. by   BonnieSc
    At least in California, the term "nurse" is a protected title. You can be charged with practicing nursing without a license if you refer to yourself as such.
  5. by   IrishItalianRN
    Nurse to me is not a medical assistant or a nursing assistant.
    Im a Nursing Assistant and when patients call me nurse i clarify to them that im just a nursing assistant.

    SCOPE OF PRACTICE is the word that im thinking of here....

    Do these MA's know that legally if they are calling themselves nurses they can be SUED as a Nurse?

    When i took my CNA class, i was still working in the front office of a primary care office and I remember informing the office manager and one of the Doctors that i was friends with that the MA's shouldnt be calling themselves Nurses because it was misrepresentation. They fully agreed and informed the MA's they are not to refer to themselves as Nurses. (of course one of them had a problem and still called herself a nurse, while others refused to refer to themselves as a nurse even before i mentioned it because they already knew the difference *smart girls* or boys haha)

    Medical Assistants go to school (here in AZ) for about 10 months and learn the specific skills needed in a DR office. Injections, blood pressure etc. They are paid (in my experiences with MA's) 8-12 dollars an hour. Doctors prefer to hire them because they can do the procedures done in Dr offices and they are cheaper to hire than nurses.....

    Nurses work hard to get their title of LPN or RN. I dont think it's fair for someone who goes to school for 10 months for a certificate (which is how long it takes here) to be calling themselves one.
    Now if I have offended anyone I didnt mean to. This is what i was taught in my classes.
    It always bothered me to hear an MA call herself a Nurse. I worked in the Back office as a on the job trained MA and did everything except injections and never called myself a nurse and i can tell you from experience it is NOT THE SAME THING.
    Someone needs to set her straight LOL
    Take Care
  6. by   gauge14iv
    Under section 301.251(d)(1) of the (Texas) Nurse Practice Act...

    (d) Unless the person holds a license under this chapter, a person may not use, in connection with the person's name:
    (1) the title "nurse"; or
    (2) any other designation tending to imply that the person is licensed to provide nursing care.


    It is on page 23 at this link:
    ftp://www.bne.state.tx.us/npa2005.pdf

    It's a very large document so it takes a bit to download.

    "Nurse" is a protected occupational title in Texas. I don't think it always has been though.
  7. by   PediRN2B2006
    I am about to start my last semester in a BSN program. I worked as a MA for almost seven years. Trust me, there is no comparison! I knew a lot about obstetrics and gynecology only because this is the type of office I worked in. I completed a 10 month program where we learned LIMITED A&P, phlebotomy, injections, and administrative duties. We learned to take vitals, but not really to interpret those values. I often felt as if I was trying to be used in a nursing role without the knowledge I needed. However, I always represented myself as an assistant and not a nurse. And I certainly did not pocess the assesment skills and critical thinking that a R.N. has!
  8. by   IrishItalianRN
    Well Said PediRN2B2006!! :yeahthat:
  9. by   Fun2, RN, BSN
    Thanks, gauge14iv.



    I really think that there is a place for medical assistants in the field, as there is a place for nurse's assistants.

    As I said before, they are not the same thing.



    Also, why in the world would anyone go to school for 2 years to be a medical assistant??? Mine was only 9 months. Two years of school isn't worth 8 bucks an hours.....sorry, no way, no how.



    Quote from gauge14iv
    Under section 301.251(d)(1) of the (Texas) Nurse Practice Act...

    (d) Unless the person holds a license under this chapter, a person may not use, in connection with the person's name:
    (1) the title "nurse"; or
    (2) any other designation tending to imply that the person is licensed to provide nursing care.


    It is on page 23 at this link:
    ftp://www.bne.state.tx.us/npa2005.pdf

    It's a very large document so it takes a bit to download.

    "Nurse" is a protected occupational title in Texas. I don't think it always has been though.
  10. by   gauge14iv
    BTW - it looks like that section of the NPA was just amended in May of this year...
  11. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from Fun2Care
    Also, why in the world would anyone go to school for 2 years to be a medical assistant??? Mine was only 9 months. Two years of school isn't worth 8 bucks an hours.....sorry, no way, no how.
    Some MAs would rather be referred to as a 'college graduate', and the only true way to achieve this accolade is by attending a community college MA program and earning an applied Associate of Science degree in Medical Assisting. If you have an AS degree, you're legally a college grad, whereas the MAs with certificates or diplomas are not legally college grads.

    I suppose the degree is very important to some MAs, so they take the 2-year route instead of the 9 to 10 month route.
  12. by   RedSox33RN
    Thank you for all of the replies! I'm glad to hear there are others who don't like people misrepresenting what they are.

    I'm stunned to learn that the program lenths vary so much. I've read anywhere from 8 months to 2 years! Wow!

    I knew from my friend becoming a Surgical Tech that the A&P and Micro she took are WAY different than the ones I've taken. There were no credit or hour value assigned to them either - they were just part of the curriculum. She said they would transfer if the wanted to go to nursing school, but I know my school would not accept them if she tried. You have to have a "B" or better in all sciences, plus they must have been 4 credit or higher. One woman I know had to take A&P 1 over again because she only took a 3 credit course (and that was with a lab!) and they wouldn't accept it.

    Anyway, I hope I never have to work with this woman. I'd only seen her this one time in the LNA conference, and boy was she "Holier-than-thou" with her attitude. If I wasn't the "new girl", you can bet I would have said something, but I've only been there a month, and don't want to p!ss anyone off or think *I'm* the holier-than-thou one.
  13. by   Fun2, RN, BSN
    After you become an RN and you see that girl, you can tell her where to go...


    ...BACK TO SCHOOL!







    Quote from wannaBEanRN
    Thank you for all of the replies! I'm glad to hear there are others who don't like people misrepresenting what they are.

    I'm stunned to learn that the program lenths vary so much. I've read anywhere from 8 months to 2 years! Wow!

    I knew from my friend becoming a Surgical Tech that the A&P and Micro she took are WAY different than the ones I've taken. There were no credit or hour value assigned to them either - they were just part of the curriculum. She said they would transfer if the wanted to go to nursing school, but I know my school would not accept them if she tried. You have to have a "B" or better in all sciences, plus they must have been 4 credit or higher. One woman I know had to take A&P 1 over again because she only took a 3 credit course (and that was with a lab!) and they wouldn't accept it.

    Anyway, I hope I never have to work with this woman. I'd only seen her this one time in the LNA conference, and boy was she "Holier-than-thou" with her attitude. If I wasn't the "new girl", you can bet I would have said something, but I've only been there a month, and don't want to p!ss anyone off or think *I'm* the holier-than-thou one.

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