Kinda confused...

  1. I posted this in the general nursing forum, but it was in the middle of a big long thread so I figured I'd ask here as well since it was likely to get overlooked in the discussion.

    Regarding degrees ... ADN, BSN... If you get a 2-yr degree, pass your boards and become and RN, what can you not do that someone who gets a 4-yr degree, passes their boards and becomes an RN can do?

    Also, what is the difference between an LPN and an RN? I'm sorry if I sound totally clueless, but the fact is...I am! :chuckle

    Thanks.
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   lisadavis
    ADN and BSN basically same function as RN's some places prefer BSN for management but this is not necessisarily a state law. LPN is one year prep and has specific limitations according to the nurses particular state. RN at least 2 year prep. in my state LPN cannot hang blood and depending on your place of employment may be severely limited in tasks. example one unit in one hospital i know of does not allow LPN's to do any type of physical assessment LPN cannot even test for blood glucose.
  4. by   fergus51
    BSN and ADN nurses are pretty much the same in terms of bedside nursing. Some places do say BSN prefered, but will in general hire ADNs without any problem at all. BSNs are required for some management and community jobs though.

    As for LPN and RN differences, that depends on the state. In some states you probably couldn't tell the difference between the two, in others the scope of practice of the LPN is much more limited.
  5. by   live4today
    Originally posted by maire
    I posted this in the general nursing forum, but it was in the middle of a big long thread so I figured I'd ask here as well since it was likely to get overlooked in the discussion.

    Regarding degrees ... ADN, BSN... If you get a 2-yr degree, pass your boards and become and RN, what can you not do that someone who gets a 4-yr degree, passes their boards and becomes an RN can do?

    Also, what is the difference between an LPN and an RN? I'm sorry if I sound totally clueless, but the fact is...I am! :chuckle

    Thanks.
    Hello maire!

    Once a RN grad passes the state boards -- regardless of whether his/her degree is an AAS/ADN or BSN degree -- they all receive the very same license to practice as a professional registered nurse.

    As for certain job requirements in the nursing field, many places prefer or require a BSN minimum. Many places require a BSN to become a school nurse, a community health nurse (but not in every state), a research nurse, a Nurse Manager (not in all hospitals, however), and/or a Nurse Educator of other RN student nurses, or LPN student nurses. Having a BSN today certainly improves a RNs chances of landing certain jobs and salaries, so it's not a total waste...depends on how far each individual nurse wants to go in their career field, and in what specific areas of nursing they pursue.

    LPNs and RNs are both licensed nurses, but the scope of practice for MOST LPNs is limited by each State Board of Nursing where they may reside. I have worked in rural hospitals where LPNs had no limitations, and hospitals where they did. Both are very viable career fields, and both offer a professionalism to the field of nursing.
  6. by   prmenrs
    In case no one mentioned it, an RN makes more money than an LVN.
  7. by   StudentSandra
    Here is a link to the "Student Nurse Forum" it is a good place to find info on nursing. The BSN is needed for Advanced Practice also, such as FNP, CRNA, etc.

    http://kcsun3.tripod.com/index.htm

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