IV starts

  1. That's what we practiced today! We use the rubber arms, and I really don't know how much that will be when we get to the real thing. At least we know what the stuff we will be using looks like and how things are SUPPOSED to go. Wonder how many patients I will take care of that have big fat puffy veins like that rubber arm!?!
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  2. 12 Comments

  3. by   NurseWeasel
    We used a rubber arm when practicing venipuncture in medical assisting school. Word to the wise: of course the real thing isn't anything like the rubber arm... but the fake one gets you past the hurdle of sticking a needle in something. Once you've done your first stick it's much better. The fear is mental - at least it was for most of us. I can't *wait* to do IV's.
  4. by   MelRN13
    The rubber arms are NOTHING like the real thing!! I got on the job training because at my facility, LPN's are trained in this...it takes alot of practice, but unsuspecting co-workers are great. I did IV starts for 2 days at the pain clinic...........and it was a pain.
    Good luck, the more you do the better you get!
  5. by   BranRN
    I learned IV starts last semester, we were supposed to do them on our "real" patients over in L&D....however, the weeks I was there for clinicals it was soooo *slow*, so I never got to start one.....hope I get to this semester.....

    I think the reason they choose us to do our first one during OB clinicals was because the patients were already in pain.....but thats just my opinion.

    Brandi
  6. by   NurseWeasel
    well and they shouldn't be too dehydrated either, which helps.
  7. by   Ortho_RN
    We do IVs this semester and we have to start them on each other BEFORE we are allowed to do them in clinical... I think that is actually good, I would rather poke my classmate several times that mess up on a pt..
  8. by   emily_mom
    I learned mine on the job, which wasn't so bad. It's easier to do it when you don't know the person and she doesn't know that you haven't done it before. Just go in with a smile and say, "I'm here to start your IV." Don't ever insert "try" in there....eesh.

    When I did them in school we didn't even get a rubber arm. We got each other and that was it. Luckily my partner is an EMT so she only had to stick me once...and vice versa!

    Kristy
  9. by   PRNnightnurse
    Originally posted by memphispanda
    That's what we practiced today! We use the rubber arms, and I really don't know how much that will be when we get to the real thing. At least we know what the stuff we will be using looks like and how things are SUPPOSED to go. Wonder how many patients I will take care of that have big fat puffy veins like that rubber arm!?!
    VERY, Very few. Most of the time, by the time they are in the hospital, they are sick enough that the veins disappear. Keep with it though. IV's become easier with each one you do.

    J.
  10. by   CountrifiedRN
    We used the rubber ones to practice on, and I agree, they are nothing like the real thing!

    I have attempted two different times to start an IV in clinicals. Yes, I said attempted, both times I was unsuccessful. I was very upset at first about not being able to get them started, but at least it made me feel a little better that the other nurses that tried after me couldn't get them either. Both patients were elderly and had already had multiple sites that had infiltrated. I just know that if I could get a patient with some big, juicy veins, I could do it!!

    Don't worry, just review your procedure before your clinicals in case the opportunity arises, and make sure you have all your supplies on hand. You'll do fine!
  11. by   essarge
    There are a lot of "tricks of the trade", next time you are in clinicals, ask one of the seasoned nurses how they do a hard stick. I do phlebotomy and some IV starts in the ER where I work and I can tell you that there are some really hard ones there, but with practice you will be fine.

    Our "rule of the thumb" is that two attempts/failures...find someone else to try. It gets much easier as time goes by. Good luck!
  12. by   NurseDennie
    Bran - I think they wanted you to learn IV sticks in L&D not because the patients were already in pain, but because pregnant ladies have all that extra blood, and they're easy sticks. Like nurseweasel said - nice and juicy.

    Love

    Dennie
  13. by   RNIAM
    I wish we were allowed to do them but we are not. Not sure as to the why's of it. I think it has more to do with the fact that the hospitals we train in have IV teams that are specially trainned to do them. Not sure though. How many RN students do IV sticks? We can set up the IV but we can't insert the needle. Does anyone else have this restriction?
  14. by   nursbee04
    We used the rubber arms too, and our teachers were like "now your pt.'s veins probably won't be as engorged as the ones on our rubber arm..." :chuckle I figure they're about as realistic as catheterizing those mannequins (esp the female)

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