Is this an exaggeration? - page 2

I keep hearing people talking about the unbearable stress, hypertension, and general distruction of their personal/family life. Can anyone out there say they have gone through/are going through... Read More

  1. by   bluesky
    Quote from asoldierswife05
    you can't cut corners with nursing.....and you did a big disservice to yourself in school as you have come to realize.
    Well actually school itself was pretty useless. I mean I did graduate with honors, sigma theta tau and from a top ten ranked BSN program. I still maintain that school itself was pretty pointless and even if I had studied my bum off in med-surg that wouldn't have helped in a fast paced critical care environment. My point remains that discipline, which may be cultivated in school, is an asset later on.

    And furthermore I don't cut corners. I merely am a great nurse instead of an exceptional one because I don't have the discipline to know Reno like the back of my hand or subscribe to all the critical care periodicals.
    Last edit by bluesky on Dec 15, '05
  2. by   not now
    I will say that it's more overwhelming than hard. I started working full-time towards the end of my LVN program and was so stressed that I was losing hair. The endless days of wake-up, go to class, head home to change clothes, go to work, come home and get a few hours of sleep before starting all over was physically taxing.
  3. by   ICRN2008
    I am also in the minority, because I am not finding nurisng school to be difficult so far. I'm on track to get straight A's this semester. I read the book, follow the grading criteria when I write my papers, and prepare for my tests. For me, the challenge has been getting used to being so busy. Most days I leave for school at 8:30 am and don't get home from work until 11 pm. I have really had to learn how to budget my time and how to ask my husband for help with stuff around the house.

    I recommend this book, it has been very helpful:
    Applying Nursing Process: A Tool For Critical Thinking by Rosalinda Alfaro-Lefevre
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/078...books&v=glance
  4. by   RNsRWe
    I'm amazed at the differences in programs from one school to another, and obviously that affects how each of us sees the difficulty level of nursing school as a whole. It isn't simply that school is easy for one person and hard for another; there's a huge difference in expectations between schools as well (not saying that if you found school less than difficult it must have been an easy program necessarily).

    My school has a passage rate (to graduate) of less than 40%; passage rates on the boards is near 100%. I don't think anyone has called their experience here easy There is another school within traveling distance that takes students who have failed out of the school I'm in; they almost always pass, and with good grades. Their passage rate on the NCLEX isn't too good, however.

    I guess what I'm thinking is that if someone tells you nursing school is easy and you're finding it hard, it's better to look at it as if your program is just really tough, rather than you're not "getting it". Much more positive

    Now, I don't want to start a war on who's in a tougher school, LOL, just that it's worth keeping in mind if you're suffering and someone else tells you it was no big deal. I know someone posted that she didn't read the textbooks and didn't even buy them for the last half of the program, and obviously it didn't hurt her schooling judging by her post. But for what it's worth, one of my instructors has been known to lift questions directly from the text (one of several texts!) without having discussed the topic at all in class! Guess she wants to make SURE we do our required reading <grin>....
  5. by   rpbear
    I agree with "not now" it is more overwhelming than hard. You need to keep your focus, take small steps. If you try to look at everything you have to do in one given week you will FREAK OUT, do one thing at a time and "just keep swimming!!!" :kiss You can do it!!!
  6. by   Future_Nurse_Natalie
    Quote from RNs2BRwe

    My school has a passage rate (to graduate) of less than 40%; passage rates on the boards is near 100%. I don't think anyone has called their experience here easy There is another school within traveling distance that takes students who have failed out of the school I'm in; they almost always pass, and with good grades. Their passage rate on the NCLEX isn't too good, however.
    Yeah here that is called Mercy College (the hard one I go to), and Lourdes (the one that takes the Mercy Rejects and has lower standards). Mercy also has 100% NCLEX passing rate for BSN's and 98% for ADN's where Lourdes is in the 70's I think. Sorry to the Lourdes Students out there, I didn't mean to offend
  7. by   nurse4theplanet
    Quote from bluesky
    Well actually school itself was pretty useless. I mean I did graduate with honors, sigma theta tau and from a top ten ranked BSN program. I still maintain that school itself was pretty pointless and even if I had studied my bum off in med-surg that wouldn't have helped in a fast paced critical care environment. My point remains that discipline, which may be cultivated in school, is an asset later on.

    And furthermore I don't cut corners. I merely am a great nurse instead of an exceptional one because I don't have the discipline to know Reno like the back of my hand or subscribe to all the critical care periodicals.
    I am sorry that you feel that school was worthless. I see that my school has provided me with a steady foundation on which to build further knowledge as I gain experience. I would never call my school, or my education worthless. If you graduated with honors, certainly you took something away from the program. It was your admission that you BS your way through certain parts of school, not mine. To me that it cutting corners, and doing yourself a disservice. You also said, you see how it has affected your nursing ability. I have no doubt that you are a great nurse, but you certainly haven't lived up to YOUR potential based on the information you gave in your own words.
  8. by   Future_Nurse_Natalie
    That's what I got out of it as well.
  9. by   MIA-RN1
    Quote from manofletters
    I keep hearing people talking about the unbearable stress, hypertension, and general distruction of their personal/family life. Can anyone out there say they have gone through/are going through school without all the side effects? I'm not suggesting it wasn't tough, but rather was wondering if anyone was able to cope without such drastic reactions? Heck, while I'm at it, was it easy for anyone?
    ITs not so bad. I am working harder than I have ever worked before in school but since it is something I am passionately interested in (and paying for!) I am enjoying the ride.
  10. by   hbncns35
    For some reason I never really thought it was that hard. After all they only give you so much to study. Once you look around and realize you are only learning the tip of the iceberg and not the iceberg it really was simple. Yes it was challenging (the tests) but the material was not hard to grasp. I did not find myself "stressing" out like other students. I am pretty level headed and handle pressure very well. I was never influenced by other's sense of panic which seemed to be all too often. I've done well in my classes and have not failed anything. Looking forward to Grad school.................Maybe that will be harder.............It's all how you look at it and manage your time and emotions....................like anything else you put your mind to.
    Heather
  11. by   Nvr2Old
    Quote from manofletters
    I keep hearing people talking about the unbearable stress, hypertension, and general distruction of their personal/family life. Can anyone out there say they have gone through/are going through school without all the side effects? I'm not suggesting it wasn't tough, but rather was wondering if anyone was able to cope without such drastic reactions? Heck, while I'm at it, was it easy for anyone?
    Boy are we living paralel lives! I ran into a girl I was in Anatomy 2 class with...she'd gone on to RN school. She said she was only doing 8 credit hours and it was kicking her ass. That after 1 semester the class had gone from 52 students to 8. My program requires 18 credit hours in the first semester. I'm scared to death. :stone . I just keep reminding myself that I'm doing great so far (alot of prayer involved). It's a big God. If He wants me here my efforts will pay off.
  12. by   Nvr2Old
    Quote from KatieBell
    I'm probably gonna get shot for saying this but better to be honest. I am one of those wierd students that did not find school very difficult. I made very good grades- though in my last year I slipped and made a B in community health, because I could just care less. My biggest issue was that I worked full time and went to school full time and was so busy. Sometimes I felt very sleepy in class. Now I was not married- so, who knows. My best buddy was however, and somehow managed to have 2 kids, be married,work part time, and be inducted into Sigma Theta Tau during her years in school. It just wasn't that difficult I guess for her.
    I'll agree with the above poster- one reason I did so well was that I read the book. Usually the weekend before the exam, I tried to read the chapters covered and note anything particularly important. As I studied I made note cards- flash cards and I carried these around with me- so when I was in line for lunch, or at the bank or in a traffic jam- I'd pull them out. I saved these cards to study for the finals- and then I actually used some of them to study for boards. I do remember one time though when a solid C student asked me how did I make good grades- I told her about the index cards and she looked me straight in the face and said, "OH.. thats too much work, I'd rather not get good grades if I have to work that hard"
    So, I did work hard, but I never found it to be particularly difficult- just a lot of work- when I went for my MPH- now that was crazy difficult and involved a lot of tears and stress.

    Oh yes and before someone makes a comment about students who are booksmart and not bedside smart- these people do exist, but are not as common as people indicate. I have been a successful ICU nurse in 2 specialty ICU's, a successful Supervisor of 2 overseas projects in Africa, and a very successful Emergency Nurse...

    Okay. I feel better now. Thank You. I'm only in a community college right now and I'm pulling in the A's because I make school a priority. But hey, I'm 43, I'm focused, my kids are big, my husband's understanding...I've got alot of things going for me. But....I'm applying for a BSN program that had 275 applicants last year and they only accepted 36. My GPA is 3.84 (I'm waiting on finals...3 A's that I know of..that darn Stats could bring a B), it could change... I'm scared,though, that I'm going to get thrown into a school full of "Me"'s and I won't be able to keep up. Ah hell...."I SAID I FELT BETTER":...angryfire :angryfire
  13. by   Catys_With_Me
    I have honestly always been together and on top of everything, but nursing school has absolutely kicked my butt. I have never been more stressed, overwhelmed, or anxious on a continuous, long-term basis in my life.

    I'm getting ready to start my last semester and can say that since school began I have used every ounce of dedication, determination, courage, and will just to get to this point. That's left very little energy to take care of myself on other levels. I've gained weight, forgotten how to cook, dealt with an infection that took 3 rounds of antibiotics to shake off, and am currently battling not to descend into a significant depression.

    My breaks have been spent studying for the tests they like to level at us our first week back and studying for boards. When I'm studying for school, I feel guilty about my family. When I'm with my family, I feel guilty about school. Disorganization and poor communication have been par for the course at my school and up until this year bullying techniques and threats of failure were also liberally thrown in for good measure. I have a 4.00 gpa in this program and yet always feel as though I'm on the verge of failure. I rarely relax even an iota until I discover I need only something like a 7% on the final to survive the course.

    The running joke in our program is that most of the class is on some kind of anti-anxiety or anti-depressant medication, and that the rest of us should be. I'm one of the ones who is not, but as I'm sure you've been able to tell from this post thus far, there's probably not a sane doctor within a thousand miles of me that would not walk me to the nearest pharmacy and hand me the Ativan himself.

    In the past, posts like mine would inspire my resolve to never, ever become like THAT person, to vow to do whatever I needed to do to keep that from happening to me. I have no doubt that you will have a similar reaction. More power to you. I sure wish I could get a piece of that person back myself.

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