Input from current nursing students

  1. I am a new nurse (graduated in May 06) and have been asked to talk to a group of nursing students in their last semester. My question for current students: What sort of advice would you want to hear from a new nurse?
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  2. 12 Comments

  3. by   erickajones24
    Couls someone help me! I am new and I do not know how to post.
    I will like to know, once you enter nursing school how long are the clinicals and nursing classes?
  4. by   adnstudent2007
    Quote from StudentNurseInWNY
    I am a new nurse (graduated in May 06) and have been asked to talk to a group of nursing students in their last semester. My question for current students: What sort of advice would you want to hear from a new nurse?
    I am a student getting ready to begin my last semester. If I were to hear a talk from a new nurse, I would want to hear about the ins-and-outs of the student to nurse transition i.e. what orientation is like, the differences between student and nurse that they don't tell you about at school, what its like studying for the NCLEX as you also start a new job, the level of stress to be prepared for. That's all I can think of right now. I may add more later!

    I think its really neat that your school has this. I hope my school has a new nurse talk to us as well.
  5. by   S.T.A.C.E.Y
    Quote from adnstudent2007
    If I were to hear a talk from a new nurse, I would want to hear about the ins-and-outs of the student to nurse transition i.e. what orientation is like, the differences between student and nurse that they don't tell you about at school, what its like studying for the NCLEX as you also start a new job, the level of stress to be prepared for.
    Ditto for the above. Plus, the interview process, when most people got their jobs, how orientation worked, local places that were hiring--especially new grad specialty programs in your area, when most people started applying, the transition from student to nurse, reasons why new nurses leave/switch jobs so quickly/early, strategies you had to implement for success, what type of pay to expect, what things to look for in a 'good' job for new grads, new grads going on to masters programs, etc.

    I can't think of anything else right now. We had a new grad come to talk to our class about her experience. She hadn't planned anything to say, and totally relied on us to shoot her questions...which of course she wasn't prepared to answer. It turned out to be a complete waste of time. Maybe ask the prof/director to get their students to come up with a list of questions to email to you the week before. That way you can answer what they specifically want to know, and you'll have a chance to ask any of your fellow new nurses about their experiences before you go to see the class.
  6. by   Megsd
    Things you wish you would have done/practiced/asked more (clinical skills, etc.) during nursing school (in this case, in your last semester) that would have helped you as a new grad.
  7. by   Kiringat
    I'd like to hear lots of funny clinical stories.
  8. by   sabrn2006
    Good feedback so far. I am planning to incorporate many of your suggestions.

    I am going to talk about the NCLEX, how to make the most of the last semester, the difference between school and the "real world", what I have observed in other new nurses that helped or hindered them, mistakes I have made and learned from, how to cope with the stress. I also plan to give them a few funny anecdotes.

    Thanks so much!
  9. by   sandybakes
    Hi, I'm an AO 16 month program, I would like to know how did you manage your time to study. I seem to be studying Patho all day and still get a 76%.



    Quote from StudentNurseInWNY
    I am a new nurse (graduated in May 06) and have been asked to talk to a group of nursing students in their last semester. My question for current students: What sort of advice would you want to hear from a new nurse?
  10. by   zena231
    I would like to know what to expect as far as what happens when you apply for a position, how much training do you get after you start (orientation and such), how long does it take you to start feeling like you are the Nurse, not just a nursing student, how do people treat you as a new nurse, what about nursing internships??..that is just some of the things going through my head
  11. by   sabrn2006
    Quote from zena231
    I would like to know what to expect as far as what happens when you apply for a position, how much training do you get after you start (orientation and such), how long does it take you to start feeling like you are the Nurse, not just a nursing student, how do people treat you as a new nurse, what about nursing internships??..that is just some of the things going through my head

    Toward the end of my orientation, I started to feel like a nurse. But........the first few times on my own were very surreal. I couldn't believe that I had to make all these decisions, that I was being entrusted to do so! And I am quite an independent person.

    Other nurses generally treated me like the brand new nurse that I was (still am really). But the patients never knew that I had just graduated. That's the amazing thing. If someone came right out and asked I was truthful but I certainly did not offer this information!! Now, with only 8 months experience I am treated as just one of the other nurses. Of course, at times my inexperience does come into play. Really, though, nurses ask each other questions EVERY day about how to do something, about a med or whatever.

    My program had optional nursing internships offered during school (after our 3rd semester of 4) and a required preceptorship at the end right before graduation. It was a great time to try on the nurse role and see more realistically what I would be doing as a "real nurse." I imagine each nursing program handles that a bit differently, though.
  12. by   sabrn2006
    Quote from sandybakes
    Hi, I'm an AO 16 month program, I would like to know how did you manage your time to study. I seem to be studying Patho all day and still get a 76%.
    I developed a rhythm that worked for me...a little bit each day, then studying more when time allowed. Studying for tests the day & night before. Sometimes I got up an hour or 2 earlier to study and other times, I stayed up into the night. The amount of studying needed varies a lot according to the individual. Patho is tough for a lot of people. The material is challenging. Try breaking the material up into manageable segments. I made charts and pictures of a lot of concepts. This helped me. Also, sometimes talking out the tougher stuff with someone else can help you both to get it.
  13. by   moongirl
    ... what did you find out after you graduated that you wished you had known as a student.... what was harder, what was easier.
  14. by   sabrn2006
    Quote from moongirl
    ... what did you find out after you graduated that you wished you had known as a student.... what was harder, what was easier.
    I found out that all nurses doubt themselves - not just the brand new ones. I also learned that I will never know it all. I will have to ask questions everyday. And I will sometimes answer others' questions.

    What was harder: Adopting a rhythm all my own is something I still struggle with. It is so hard to get it all done sometimes! I also found it hard to hear report and then hit the ground running with only minimal information about my assigned patients (i.e. often just dx, VS, activity and diet order, IVs, med times, tx due) And doing new things after only reading about it or seeing it done 1x.

    What was easier was convincing my patients that I knew what to do. That was much easier than convincing myself....LOL.

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