I'm sorry, but some nursing diagnoses are just ridiculous! - page 3

Ineffective denial...as opposed to EFFECTIVE denial? Disturbed energy field Impaired environmental interpretation syndrome Health-seeking behaviors (the horror!) Impaired home maintenance (I'm... Read More

  1. by   BETSRN
    Quote from klone
    Ineffective denial...as opposed to EFFECTIVE denial?
    Disturbed energy field
    Impaired environmental interpretation syndrome
    Health-seeking behaviors (the horror!)
    Impaired home maintenance (I'm guilty of that one! If only I could do a collaborative intervention with Merry Maids)
    Ineffective protection
    Noncompliance
    Wandering

    Some of these just made me chuckle, and made me wonder about the people who come up with them.
    Are those NANDA approved nursing diagnoses? I never heard those (of course I ahev been away from school for 20 years now). We nurses would all agree with you: you rarely ever run into nursing diagnoses after you graduate!
  2. by   RN4NICU
    Charting noncompliance is not being judgemental, it is an observation of fact and legally necessary (IMO). You get some shmuck that is not compliant with the treatment regimen that decides to sue when serious complications occur - the only leg you have to stand on when said shmuck tells the court "I didn't know any better - I'm not a doctor or a nurse" is documentation that the patient DID know what he/she was supposed to do but refused to do it. Otherwise, some dumb-a**ed jury will hand them over a settlement out of sheer ignorance. Yet if there is documentation in the legal record, the patient no longer gets the benefit of the doubt because there is no longer any doubt - the teaching WAS done and the patient WAS noncompliant and DID cause his/her own complications.

    I will continue to use it. But again, just my opinion (and my license to protect).
  3. by   BETSRN
    Quote from RN4NICU
    Charting noncompliance is not being judgemental, it is an observation of fact and legally necessary (IMO). You get some shmuck that is not compliant with the treatment regimen that decides to sue when serious complications occur - the only leg you have to stand on when said shmuck tells the court "I didn't know any better - I'm not a doctor or a nurse" is documentation that the patient DID know what he/she was supposed to do but refused to do it. Otherwise, some dumb-a**ed jury will hand them over a settlement out of sheer ignorance. Yet if there is documentation in the legal record, the patient no longer gets the benefit of the doubt because there is no longer any doubt - the teaching WAS done and the patient WAS noncompliant and DID cause his/her own complications.

    I will continue to use it. But again, just my opinion (and my license to protect).
    You can chart all your teaching without using nursing diagnoses.
  4. by   jnette
    Quote from RN4NICU
    Charting noncompliance is not being judgemental, it is an observation of fact and legally necessary (IMO). You get some shmuck that is not compliant with the treatment regimen that decides to sue when serious complications occur - the only leg you have to stand on when said shmuck tells the court "I didn't know any better - I'm not a doctor or a nurse" is documentation that the patient DID know what he/she was supposed to do but refused to do it. Otherwise, some dumb-a**ed jury will hand them over a settlement out of sheer ignorance. Yet if there is documentation in the legal record, the patient no longer gets the benefit of the doubt because there is no longer any doubt - the teaching WAS done and the patient WAS noncompliant and DID cause his/her own complications.

    I will continue to use it. But again, just my opinion (and my license to protect).
    I wholeheartedly agree with you.. I was merely pointing out that in several of my nursing school books it was mentioned that the term "non compliant" is no longer going to be considered appropriate, as it bears negative/judgemental connotations. Still haven'y gone back to see just what acedemai was replacoing it with, but I do know that it either is ALREADY or is BEING revised/reworded.
    So what happens to patient accountability?

    Guess it's now every one's responsibilty but the patient's to improve his/her health status.
  5. by   mariedoreen
    Quote from RN4NICU
    Who won't let you use the word noncompliant? I truly hope that there is a better rationale than "it is too negative"!

    That is a dangerous limitation to put on you. Documentation of noncompliance is what protects nurses legally. It shows that we are doing we are supposed to do, but that the patients (or "clients" ) are cooperating. That shifts the legal responsibility for any negative outcome from the nurses back to the patient, which is where it belongs if the patient is noncompliant with the plan of care. I would look into having that side of things addressed. It is not a good precedent to set. The chart is a legal document - not a newspaper article. The focus should be on documenting what is actually happening, not keeping up appearances. If student nurses are being taught otherwise, they will graduate and enter the profession not knowing how to (or realizing that they should) protect themselves, legally. That is just unacceptable.
    There's supposed to be another word for it, because non-compliant is not considered PC anymore. Our instructors can't remember what this other word is however...
  6. by   michelle95
    Ineffective therapeutic management or something like that is used for "noncompliance". I'll have to look up in my notes what my teacher said.

    Yeah.
  7. by   chiefswife
    Klone,

    Cheer up! I thought they were funny too! :chuckle

    Last semester, our instructor told us she wanted us to be creative with our NANDAs, so I used the "Disturbed Energy Field"...I got the star for being creative that day! (between you and me, I didn't really understand it then, and I don't think I do now, but it was fun working out interventions and evaluations for it! ) :chuckle :chuckle
  8. by   Claver
    In home care we use nursing diagnoses on our oasis and plans of care. However, since in the DD field nursing diagnoses are not used. I often wonder why are they called by such long boring names - we can not use medical terms - so constipation becomes "ineffective bowel evacuation "YIPES!!!!!
  9. by   HappyNurse2005
    I often wonder why are they called by such long boring names - we can not use medical terms - so constipation becomes "ineffective bowel evacuation "YIPES!!!!!
    But Constipation is a nursing diagnosis, according to my Ackley/Ladwig book. Unless you are just using constipation as a random example, I dont understand why you couldn't say it.

    In regards to using medical words, we were told we couldn't use a medical dx as the r/t part, but could use it as the secondary to. For ex : "risk for infection r/t hyperglycemia secondary to diabetes mellitus"
  10. by   helpinghands
    We were also told not to use the term "compliant" because it sounded to negative. The new pc term we were told to use is "does not adhere"
  11. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    "Does not adhere" sounds like a Band-Aid that isn't sticky anymore.
  12. by   Fiona59
    I hate the term "client". I always think it makes us sound like high class call girls.


    As in "I had a six bed assignment last night with five clients".
  13. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    I hear 'client', i think of Hair Club for Men.

    "And i'm not only the club president, but i'm also a client!"

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