Im so angry!!!!!!!Did bad on test.

  1. In my health assessment test I barely got a 70% and I needed a 78% to pass. This is for my internet Health Assessment class. The teacher said everyone did bad and she even gave us two questions. But I noticed a lot of the questions were not good questions and not even fair. There were questions on there where both answers were correct I knew this because I looked in my book and confirmed it. Is this how my nursing program is going to be not even knowing if you are going to pass the next test because the instructors always put very tricky questions that dont make sense when you read the question but when the instructor explains she points out the smallest thing that makes it right. Are all nursing program tests about tricking the student? Because if its not, that is sure what it feels like. I could understand if there were a few tricky question but not the whole test!! When is our knowledge really going to be put to use, and when are we really going to be credited for all our studying. We have to study our butts off, juggling all these classes, and making nursing our life to Fail a Test!!!!! I feel so bumbed like why did I choose a program that does not always credit you for the hard work you put in. Im so disillusionized. I need someone to lift me up and say you can do this. Is this program really in ones hands?
    Last edit by lizzyberry on Oct 8, '07
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  2. 17 Comments

  3. by   Soup Turtle
    Yes, the tests are like that. One answer may be right, and another may be "more right". It can be frustrating, but the good news is most of us learn to anticipate the types of questions that will be on our tests and learn to think in the "nursely" manner that the instructors want us to. Do you have an NCLEX review book yet? If not, consider getting one....and good luck on your next test! Fear of failing can be good motivation.
  4. by   krenee
    Did you get a class average? I would think whether the test was fair or not would be reflected in the average . . .

    Kelly
  5. by   09RN
    I understand exactly where you are at. Im so discouraged too. I study so hard and it really doesnt matter. I could study a month 24 hrs straight and would still miss the same questions!! Today we had 2 tests as usual but these were the 2 hardest of the semester. The class ahead of me told me the class average was a 52% on it. Im not sure how I did but I dont feel good about it. After talking with my other classmates they feel the same way. It was told that the last 5 semester have failed this particular test. Wouldnt ya think the teacher would get a clue by now??

    I actually thought about quitting today. That really shocked me as Im not a quitter. But its hard when you bust you know what and still not do well.

    Sorry to make this so long..really just wanted to let you know that I feel your pain!
  6. by   ari3sdog
    Quote from lizzyberry
    In my health assessment test I barely got a 70% and I needed a 78% to pass. This is for my internet Health Assessment class. The teacher said everyone did bad and she even gave us two questions. But I noticed a lot of the questions were not good questions and not even fair. There were questions on there where both answers were correct I knew this because I looked in my book and confirmed it. Is this how my nursing program is going to be not even knowing if you are going to pass the next test because the instructors always put very tricky questions that dont make sense when you read the question but when the instructor explains she points out the smallest thing that makes it right. Are all nursing program tests about tricking the student? Because if its not, that is sure what it feels like. I could understand if there were a few tricky question but not the whole test!! When is our knowledge really going to be put to use, and when are we really going to be credited for all our studying. We have to study our butts off, juggling all these classes, and making nursing our life to Fail a Test!!!!! I feel so bumbed like why did I choose a program that does not always credit you for the hard work you put in. Im so disillusionized. I need someone to lift me up and say you can do this. Is this program really in ones hands?
    I used Kaplan strategies. This will help you focus on the question clearer.:spin:
  7. by   ari3sdog
    Quote from TurtleSoup
    Yes, the tests are like that. One answer may be right, and another may be "more right". It can be frustrating, but the good news is most of us learn to anticipate the types of questions that will be on our tests and learn to think in the "nursely" manner that the instructors want us to. Do you have an NCLEX review book yet? If not, consider getting one....and good luck on your next test! Fear of failing can be good motivation.
    I used Kaplan Strategies. :spin:
  8. by   missninaRN
    Unfortunately, nursing exams do more than measure memorization skills; they test critical thinking. This comes easier to some than others, but can be developed.
    Do NCLEX style practice questions and read all of the rationales. Go to test reviews, if your school offers them, NOT to argue the questions, but to learn why the right answers were correct.
    There are very few people in my program who have never failed a nursing test; these tests are different from anything we've taken before and not "getting it" at first doesn't mean that you won't make it through. Don't give up.
  9. by   RainDreamer
    Yes, nursing tests are like that. They're not like tests you've taken before, where you can just memorize all of the material and then get an A on the test. I know they seem like stupid, frustrating questions, but they're just trying to get you to critically think.

    Have you checked out the student forums here? Look around on those forums, as there are some great tips on studying and test taking. Here are some tips I posted in the past that helped when I was in school:

    Before reading the question, cover up the answers. Just read the question. Think about it. What comes to your mind? Think about what you know. Even write some things down there on the test (if you're allowed to write on the test). Then look at the answers and see what's there that fits with what first came to your mind. A lot of those answers could very well apply, but it might not apply to that certain situation in the question, therefore the distractors will throw you off. Cover the answers first!

    Secondly, look at what the question is asking. A lot of times there are two correct answers, that's why you need to look at the question and see what it's actually ASKING. The answer is sometimes in the question. If it's a priority question, it's asking what the nurse would do first. These used to throw me off at first because they are all correct answers, in that they are all interventions that the nurse would do, BUT, it's asking which ONE of those would the nurse do first. When you get these questions, remember your ABCs. Which is the most critical? Which is top priority over all the others?

    And I know this is said so often, but read the question carefully! I have made so many mistakes on simple questions because I missed a simple part of the question. Make sure you know what the question is asking. Choose the best answer you think fits, then read the question again carefully, just to make sure.

    Don't read too much into a question. If a lot of information isn't given, then don't sit there and try to come up with more information, more than likely they're just looking for a simple answer. So many times we read the question, then start thinking of other information that could/would/maybe fit in there, and we tend going off track, therefore missing what the question is even asking! Just keep it simple. Look at what it's asking, don't go off track and look for something that's not there.

    If you read the question and just don't know it, then cross out the choices that you know for sure aren't correct. This way it eliminates your choices, and gives you a better chance in guessing correctly.

    Get a good night's sleep! I know people say that all the time, but it's so important! I used to try taking tests after staying up all night, it's just not a good thing. I know getting a full 8 hours of sleep the night before a test isn't plausible, but I always made sure I got about 4-6 hours of sleep the night before, then I wake up 2-3 hours before the test and go over my notecards again. Eat a good breakfast and walk into that test with CONFIDENCE! That's so important .... go in there with the attitude that you will do well!

    Good luck to you
    Last edit by RainDreamer on Oct 8, '07
  10. by   GingerSue
    I find that it helps when studying, to make up my own questions on the material, and try to anticipate the kinds of questions that they might create

    And to learn the material thoroughly. During an exam, I keep a spare blank sheet of paper beside me, in order to sometimes write down what I know about a topic (briefly, for my own use) and this might help me arrive at my final answer to their question.

    And I use those CDs with the textbooks because they have practice questions.
  11. by   MikeyJ
    Welcome to nursing school.
  12. by   DaFreak71
    It's happened to the best of us, so please don't be discouraged to the point of wanting to quit.

    1. Don't expect to get an A on every test no matter how hard you've tried. C=RN, just try to focus on WHY your answer was incorrect.

    2. I've had my fair share of instructors who write their own tests (as opposed to using a test bank) and SEVERAL times there have been either such poorly worded questions or several answers were correct.

    In that case, review your test and refer back to your text book. In my program, if you can prove that the test answer you chose was incorrect, but the book says you're correct, we get the points for that question.

    Here's a bit of advice that I wish I had followed early on...

    Don't focus only on the instructors notes (if they even give notes) and don't just focus on what they SAY in class. You cannot prove that the instructor contradicted themselves, but the text book is like your own private lawyer...facts are facts.

    If you do have to refer to the text and point out that you were correct based on the text information, be polite about it. Don't come across like you're doubting their knowledge. Hopefully it won't come up too often, but be prepared for it to happen at least a few times during your nursing program.

    And by the way, don't beat yourself up. It's one little test and that doesn't measure your intelligence or self worth. It's gonna be ok. We all go through this at some point. You are in good company here.
  13. by   ari3sdog
    Quote from RainDreamer
    Yes, nursing tests are like that. They're not like tests you've taken before, where you can just memorize all of the material and then get an A on the test. I know they seem like stupid, frustrating questions, but they're just trying to get you to critically think.

    Have you checked out the student forums here? Look around on those forums, as there are some great tips on studying and test taking. Here are some tips I posted in the past that helped when I was in school:

    Before reading the question, cover up the answers. Just read the question. Think about it. What comes to your mind? Think about what you know. Even write some things down there on the test (if you're allowed to write on the test). Then look at the answers and see what's there that fits with what first came to your mind. A lot of those answers could very well apply, but it might not apply to that certain situation in the question, therefore the distractors will throw you off. Cover the answers first!

    Secondly, look at what the question is asking. A lot of times there are two correct answers, that's why you need to look at the question and see what it's actually ASKING. The answer is sometimes in the question. If it's a priority question, it's asking what the nurse would do first. These used to throw me off at first because they are all correct answers, in that they are all interventions that the nurse would do, BUT, it's asking which ONE of those would the nurse do first. When you get these questions, remember your ABCs. Which is the most critical? Which is top priority over all the others?

    And I know this is said so often, but read the question carefully! I have made so many mistakes on simple questions because I missed a simple part of the question. Make sure you know what the question is asking. Choose the best answer you think fits, then read the question again carefully, just to make sure.

    Don't read too much into a question. If a lot of information isn't given, then don't sit there and try to come up with more information, more than likely they're just looking for a simple answer. So many times we read the question, then start thinking of other information that could/would/maybe fit in there, and we tend going off track, therefore missing what the question is even asking! Just keep it simple. Look at what it's asking, don't go off track and look for something that's not there.

    If you read the question and just don't know it, then cross out the choices that you know for sure aren't correct. This way it eliminates your choices, and gives you a better chance in guessing correctly.

    Get a good night's sleep! I know people say that all the time, but it's so important! I used to try taking tests after staying up all night, it's just not a good thing. I know getting a full 8 hours of sleep the night before a test isn't plausible, but I always made sure I got about 4-6 hours of sleep the night before, then I wake up 2-3 hours before the test and go over my notecards again. Eat a good breakfast and walk into that test with CONFIDENCE! That's so important .... go in there with the attitude that you will do well!

    Good luck to you
    You been reading Kaplan..huh? Same here
  14. by   lizzyberry
    Quote from RainDreamer
    Yes, nursing tests are like that. They're not like tests you've taken before, where you can just memorize all of the material and then get an A on the test. I know they seem like stupid, frustrating questions, but they're just trying to get you to critically think.

    Have you checked out the student forums here? Look around on those forums, as there are some great tips on studying and test taking. Here are some tips I posted in the past that helped when I was in school:

    Before reading the question, cover up the answers. Just read the question. Think about it. What comes to your mind? Think about what you know. Even write some things down there on the test (if you're allowed to write on the test). Then look at the answers and see what's there that fits with what first came to your mind. A lot of those answers could very well apply, but it might not apply to that certain situation in the question, therefore the distractors will throw you off. Cover the answers first!

    Secondly, look at what the question is asking. A lot of times there are two correct answers, that's why you need to look at the question and see what it's actually ASKING. The answer is sometimes in the question. If it's a priority question, it's asking what the nurse would do first. These used to throw me off at first because they are all correct answers, in that they are all interventions that the nurse would do, BUT, it's asking which ONE of those would the nurse do first. When you get these questions, remember your ABCs. Which is the most critical? Which is top priority over all the others?

    And I know this is said so often, but read the question carefully! I have made so many mistakes on simple questions because I missed a simple part of the question. Make sure you know what the question is asking. Choose the best answer you think fits, then read the question again carefully, just to make sure.

    Don't read too much into a question. If a lot of information isn't given, then don't sit there and try to come up with more information, more than likely they're just looking for a simple answer. So many times we read the question, then start thinking of other information that could/would/maybe fit in there, and we tend going off track, therefore missing what the question is even asking! Just keep it simple. Look at what it's asking, don't go off track and look for something that's not there.

    If you read the question and just don't know it, then cross out the choices that you know for sure aren't correct. This way it eliminates your choices, and gives you a better chance in guessing correctly.

    Get a good night's sleep! I know people say that all the time, but it's so important! I used to try taking tests after staying up all night, it's just not a good thing. I know getting a full 8 hours of sleep the night before a test isn't plausible, but I always made sure I got about 4-6 hours of sleep the night before, then I wake up 2-3 hours before the test and go over my notecards again. Eat a good breakfast and walk into that test with CONFIDENCE! That's so important .... go in there with the attitude that you will do well!

    Good luck to you
    I love that "cover your answers first."

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