I'm confused..what's the difference between a ADN and BSN

  1. What's the difference between the two as far as the amount of schooling? I just made an appointment with my school counselor, so I'm sure she knows the answer to this question, but in the meantime, maybe you guys can fill me in. I'm going to a community college, and i was working on getting my AA in Business and transfering to a Cal State school. This would've been my last semester at a cc, but now I decided that I'm going to do nursing, so now now I have to do my pre-req's for that. My cc offers a nursing program, but the waiting list is ridiculous! There's a few Cal state schools around where I live that I can get my BSN from, but what's the difference? Isn't the nursing program at a cc 2 years? Is that after my pre-req's?
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  2. 24 Comments

  3. by   Achoo!
    ADN- associate degree
    BSN- bachelors, more schooling

    I don't belive you can get a BSN at a community college, correct me if I am wrong anyone..
  4. by   Sheri257
    Quote from Achoo!
    ADN- associate degree
    BSN- bachelors, more schooling
    Well, here's an interesting question. Is a one year accelerated BSN more schooling? I've been wondering about this since there seems to be less difference between the two, at least in terms of time involved.

    :spin:
  5. by   Achoo!
    Quote from lizz
    Well, here's an interesting question. Is a one year accelerated BSN more schooling? I've been wondering about this since there seems to be less difference between the two, at least in terms of time involved.

    :spin:
    I was under the impression that the BSN has the same as ADN, then also adds more nursing theory/humanities geared courses.
  6. by   LauraF, RN
    Community College's are also known as junior colleges. They give an ADN, or an associates of pre-nursing. Which you then go to a 4 year college to get the BSN. BSN requires more theory, management classes.
  7. by   jenrninmi
    Quote from RN2BLPN4NOW
    Community College's are also known as junior colleges. They give an ADN, or an associates of pre-nursing. Which you then go to a 4 year college to get the BSN. BSN requires more theory, management classes.
    I don't think it's and associates of pre nursing it's associates degree in nursing. They are still an RN just as a BSN will be an RN. But as far as I know BSN requires more theory, research and management classes and at least in my school just as many clinical hours as an adn program.
  8. by   Iluvhospice
    Quote from JENRN2BMICHIGAN
    I don't think it's and associates of pre nursing it's associates degree in nursing. They are still an RN just as a BSN will be an RN. But as far as I know BSN requires more theory, research and management classes and at least in my school just as many clinical hours as an adn program.
    You're right. It's not an associates degree of PRE nursing - it's an associate degree of nursing. When you graduate and pass the N-Clex - you are an R.N. If you go to a BSN program - you have 2 years of general education - and 2 years of nursing with a lot of emphasis on management and theory - and when you graduate and pass the NClex - you are an R.N. - with the opportunity to continue on to graduate school and more advanced degrees, if you choose.
    So many choices... that's what so wonderful about this career choice! Best of luck to you!
  9. by   mamaof3
    Quote from SarahRN2B
    You're right. It's not an associates degree of PRE nursing - it's an associate degree of nursing. When you graduate and pass the N-Clex - you are an R.N. If you go to a BSN program - you have 2 years of general education - and 2 years of nursing with a lot of emphasis on management and theory - and when you graduate and pass the NClex - you are an R.N. - with the opportunity to continue on to graduate school and more advanced degrees, if you choose.
    So many choices... that's what so wonderful about this career choice! Best of luck to you!

    Yes, SarahRN2B is right. I am currently going to a junior college to get my RN. I will have my associates degree in it. The nursing program itself is two years long but with the pre-reqs it takes a little longer. But in the end I will be an RN. At my school, you can also go 2 more years after you ADN to get your BSN. The classes are taken on the junior college campus but the degree comes from a 4 year college that they are affliated with. The differences between ADN and BSN..... ADN gets you to be a floor nurse and BSN is needed to get into management type positions
  10. by   Sheri257
    Quote from Achoo!
    I was under the impression that the BSN has the same as ADN, then also adds more nursing theory/humanities geared courses.
    My question is, how do you cram all of that into a one year accelerated BSN program (or 16 months, etc.), when an ADN usually takes two years. And, in that scenario, is an accelerated BSN really more schooling?
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Mar 30, '04
  11. by   Achoo!
    Do you need any credits before you start the program?? I know my ADN program is considered 2 years but it really takes longer because most people can't do the co-req's along with the core nursing classes.
  12. by   Cherish
    Actually Community colleges offer associate degrees in nursing and PRE-nursing. The Pre-nursing is to transfer for a 4 yr school for a BSN. Some universities offer Pre-nursing because they don't have a BSN program. The reason why they offer pre-nursing is so you can transfer to a school (BSN) without having to worry about your credits not matching. They also offer pre-nursing for people under scholarship because some scholarships you can get for being in pre-nursing or regular nursing because the end result will be the person seeking to become an RN. The difference between ADN and BSN is nothing EXCEPT with BSN you can advance your career i.e. CRNA (anethesist*spelling*), Nurse Practioner, Nurse Midwife(a lot of people I know want to do this so if you want to go the BSN route its shorter) Management (some hospitals accept ADN but MOST prefer BSN), if you wanted to join the Military (as an officer you HAVE to have a BSN), etc (there are so many different jobs/titles where you need a BSN). If you just wanted to do regular nursing then ADN is fine. If you want to advance (make way more money) then BSN is what you should seek. The schooling is more theory and management oriented for BSN other than ADN. If you want to save money BSN is the way to go if you know you want to advance (my goal is to become a CRNA so I'm going into a BSN program). Its also shorter because a lot of nurses I know with ADN say it took them a longer time to get there BSN because once you get out of school with all the hours you work you feel like you don't want to go back. Instead of taking 5-10 yrs delaying your BSN then going back to school for it you can just do it from the get go. If not and you want to be a regular nurse then ADN is more beneficial and cheaper. Hope that answers your question
    Last edit by Cherish on Mar 30, '04
  13. by   LadyT618
    As far as I know, an accelerated program isn't more work, in terms of classes. Instead of going back for a third semester or more, they cram everything into the summer and the Fall and Spring, so it's just really really intense. Also, you usually finish your pre-reqs before entering an accelerated BSN program.
  14. by   GracefulRN
    Just to add to what LadyT618 said, technically an accelerated BSN does require a bit more schoolin' because all of the accelerated programs I know of require that you already have a bachelors degree. My $0.02 to the OP, there is no difference in a real world setting between an ADN and a BSN prepared RN;however, as a caveat I will agree with those who said that if it is your desire to become an advanced practice nurse, then the most cost effective route is to go for the BSN directly.

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