I failed out of nursing school, now what?

  1. So I failed out of nursing school by one point in my class. I am really down about it. I have really bad testing anxiety. I am really good hands on but when it comes to the textbook and testing I just have a hard time. I basically have two options at this point. Stay at my school and switch majors to respiratory therapy and finish that in two years for an associates degree and go back to nursing (dual degree program) or just go to a different school and start over on nursing. I just don't want to waste anymore time then I have. I love nursing and I do not see myself doing anything else. It is my passionate and I am so heartbroken that this happened. I just have no idea what to do.
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   Rionoir
    I mean, the first thing you need to do is be honest with yourself about what went wrong. It's easy to blame it all on test anxiety, but there's likely more to it than just that, right? If the information was studied correctly and in your head, just being an anxious test taker wouldn't cause you to fail out of school. So before you jump (and possibly fail) in another subject, which will also require you to read textbooks, I'd seek out some help with your study strategies.

    How were your pre-req grades?
  4. by   jackieee
    Yes you're right, its also because during the time I was dealing with a lot of family issues and my father going for surgery, not doing well after it and me working full time. I have no other choice, I need to work. my pre-req grades were excellent, A-'s and B+'s
  5. by   meanmaryjean
    OP: First of all, deep breath. I applaud the fact that (unlike so many other posters in your situation) you are not casting blame on the faculty, the school, the 'unfair' test questions. You recognize the problem lies within- that's a good first step.

    I'm obviously not you, but here is what I would do in your situation. Take some time to collect yourself. A couple of weeks will not make or break your future. Find some resources to help with the test anxiety (which almost everyone has). Investigate some schools, including the RT program at yours. Make lists and compare your options.

    If you could complete RT in two years, it is a GREAT flexible, fairly well-paying way to support yourself through another nursing program down the road. In the meantime, you get valuable experience, and most employers are going to jump at an applicant who is both an RT and an RN. There are a number of AN members who are both.

    Take care!
  6. by   jackieee
    Thank you, that was a huge help. Is it bad to just have an associates in RT? I know some places don't want associates. I was thinking doing the RT which gives me an associates and a bachelors in HSL then going back to nursing school.
  7. by   meanmaryjean
    Quote from jackieee
    Thank you, that was a huge help. Is it bad to just have an associates in RT? I know some places don't want associates. I was thinking doing the RT which gives me an associates and a bachelors in HSL then going back to nursing school.
    Most RT programs are associates- there are very few bachelor's in RT (my son was an RT student)
  8. by   fibroblast
    Quote from jackieee
    Thank you, that was a huge help. Is it bad to just have an associates in RT? I know some places don't want associates. I was thinking doing the RT which gives me an associates and a bachelors in HSL then going back to nursing school.
    If your heart wants to go in to nursing I would do that. Good thing about respiratory therapy is there assessments are only 5 minutes (Are you on O2, have you ever been on O2, etc).
  9. by   sweet.tea
    Don't be discouraged. Theres a lot of options here that can be done. It's also important to realize that everything happens for a reason and you may not understand why it occurred but you will later. You never know, depending on the 2nd nursing program youre in it may be 10x better or you may graduate with honors. you honestly don't know. Now you can get your RT if you like,

    OR you can do LPN (1 year) get you ASN after (1 year) get your BSN (1-2 year).

    OR you can do ASN (2 year)

    OR ASN (2 year) then BSN (1-2 year)

    OR BSN program with your prerequisites it may not even be 4 years, itll take 2-3 year.

    If your passion is nursing, don't give up on it. Just focus on becoming one, don't focus too much on timing.
    Last edit by sweet.tea on Jan 12

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