I failed out of nursing school midway, now what? - page 3

So, I decided to complete and one year accelerated BSN program in May. I quickly became the class' unofficial "class president" by planning events for us to do, and even speaking to professors and... Read More

  1. by   TanyaBrown
    You are a special case because of your ADHD. You have to be tailored to. The way students with ADHD learn is different from the rest. Please understand this is not a race to the top. I failedo ut of pharmacology and now I am a nurse practitioner in a very busy ER. If i had stopped at pharm who knows where I would be?
    find out why you failed, review your quizzes. USE YOUR RESOURCES. these programs are super excelorated so tyring videos like The Great Nurse offers can really place things quickly and effectivly. Try to practice quizzes online before yur tests. RN Quizzes offers the ability to upload your study guide and get a practice quiz from there. FOCUS ON WHAT YOU GET WRONG! use sources liek nursing made easy books if you are more of a reader and dont like videos.
  2. by   EternalFeather
    My friend failed medsurg and it wasnt until a year until that same class was offered again. she decided to become a phlebotomist in the meantime until it was time to go back to nursing school. try that instead of CNA
  3. by   LPNDebbie
    You are too focused on pleasing others and feeling like you let everyone down. As you learned, this didn't work out in your favor so next time focus on YOU! A year flies by. Wait for it and take the 2 year.
  4. by   Jdrog60
    Same thing happened to me. Missed a final c by 1 point. Very devastating. I continued working as nurse tech for a year then started back. Been ADN RN for 27 years now.
  5. by   Silverdragon102
    Closing for staff review
  6. by   tnbutterfly
    Several off-topic and divisive posts removed.

    Thread re-opened. Please stay on topic which happens to be providing constructive comments for the OP and not attacking one another.
  7. by   HermioneG
    OP,

    I was diagnosed with ADD as a child, and my brother has it as well. Through the years I've noticed marked differences in my academic performance from when I don't take medication for it compared to when I do.

    I currently take Adderall. I have a 30mg XR for long days on the floor and 10 mg short acting medication for study days.

    My suggestion would be to talk to your doctor and see if this might be an option for you. Just a warning though, think long and hard if you do take them about who you tell. I personally received a lot of push back from my peers when I started taking it again (I'm an open person so I don't mind sharing that kind of thing), but when I actually sat down with many of them and we had an open discussion about it their attitude improved. Figure out your own feelings on it! I just say that now because some people may not respond positively if you tell them you're going to go on medicaioms for it (at least from my experience).

    Do what is best for you and best of luck! We're here for you!
    Last edit by HermioneG on Oct 28, '17
  8. by   OrganizedChaos
    Quote from TanyaBrown
    You are a special case because of your ADHD. You have to be tailored to. The way students with ADHD learn is different from the rest. Please understand this is not a race to the top. I failedo ut of pharmacology and now I am a nurse practitioner in a very busy ER. If i had stopped at pharm who knows where I would be?
    find out why you failed, review your quizzes. USE YOUR RESOURCES. these programs are super excelorated so tyring videos like The Great Nurse offers can really place things quickly and effectivly. Try to practice quizzes online before yur tests. RN Quizzes offers the ability to upload your study guide and get a practice quiz from there. FOCUS ON WHAT YOU GET WRONG! use sources liek nursing made easy books if you are more of a reader and dont like videos.
    No one is special, that is how special snowflakes are created. She is an adult & has to talk to her provider about the best way to monitor her ADHD. No one is going to cater to her in the real world & there is definitely not that much help for people with disabilities in college versus elementary thru high school.
  9. by   Destin293
    Quote from OrganizedChaos
    No one is special, that is how special snowflakes are created. She is an adult & has to talk to her provider about the best way to monitor her ADHD. No one is going to cater to her in the real world & there is definitely not that much help for people with disabilities in college versus elementary thru high school.
    Actually, there is a lot of help for people with disabilities in college. That is why there is an office for students with disabilities in every college. They work with students to best accommodate their disabilities so they can be successful in college...this includes ADHD.
  10. by   OrganizedChaos
    Quote from Destin293
    Actually, there is a lot of help for people with disabilities in college. That is why there is an office for students with disabilities in every college. They work with students to best accommodate their disabilities so they can be successful in college...this includes ADHD.
    Did I say there was no help? I said not compared to the help they receive in elementary-high school. They may get help, but it certainly isn't to the extent as before. I think I would know since my brother is dyslexic & I have bipolar disorder.

    The amount of help he received in high school was overwhelming, but how much help he received in college was nowhere near it. Yes, you will get help but it won’t be similar to the amount of help.
    Last edit by OrganizedChaos on Oct 29, '17
  11. by   Rekt
    Quote from OrganizedChaos
    Did I say there was no help? I said not compared to the help they receive in elementary-high school. They may get help, but it certainly isn't to the extent as before. I think I would know since my brother is dyslexic & I have bipolar disorder.

    The amount of help he received in high school was overwhelming, but how much help he received in college was nowhere near it. Yes, you will get help but it won't be similar to the amount of help.
    Okay.......
    Last edit by Rekt on Oct 29, '17 : Reason: not worth anyone's time
  12. by   direw0lf
    Maybe it depends largely on the college? My college works with autistic individuals and my classmate has ADHD. It's a tremendous amount of support given, in fact, more than my high school gave to those struggling with anything (my high school was huge and in inner city to be fair though)

    I would go against what everyone has said although I might be giving bad advice, but maybe OP you can find another college, one that's maybe smaller sized and/or that has a strong support. Have you ever heard of TRIO federal education programs? TRIO is for students who meet a certain criteria (such as diagnosed with a learning disability or being the first person in your family to go to college). Maybe you can look into that.
  13. by   gM_2010
    Good advice from all the previous posters. I have one more suggestion. If you reapply to your current program or a new one, find that university/school's office for student disabilities. Every college has a process for assessing and handling students with accommodations for disabilities. I ran large Med-Surg 2 classes at a major university and was REQUIRED to accommodate students who followed my university's process for learning disabilities. It was the students' responsibilities to see their disability services advisor every semester and bring me the test accommodation.

    I was not obligated not required to honor any request for accommodations for a student who didn't come through student disability services. If you do or believe you may have a learning disability, it would be worth your time to seek out the student disability services office of your university and make an appointment for assessment and learn your your university/school's procedures for handling test accommodations.

    Good luck!

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