Hypovolemia vs. Dehydration?

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    After trolling through a bunch of study guides I guess myabe I'm just dense. In one guide it mentions that dehydration is specifically a lack of fluid specifically intracellular. However in another one and in my text it mentions dehydration in more of a symptomatic context. Any help? Thanks.
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    If the fluid volume is not adequate, then the cells do not have access to the adequate amount of fluid, correct? Whatever the method of fluid loss, there is not enough input to supply the continued fluid needs.
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    I thought dehydration pertained to insufficent intracellular fluid amounts...period. hypovolemia refers to insuffiecent extracellular fluid amounts. in an attempt to decrease the rising blood/solute concentration the cells will give up their intracellular fluid to the extracellular space. this causes dehydration, an insufficent amount of intracellular fluid. therfore, dehydration can be a symptom of hypovolemia when the cells lose water in an attempt to maintain homeostasis. an important side note is that b/c the brain cells also lose water IV fluids must be given slowly (over 48 hrs) to prevent rapid swelling of the cells which can cause cerebral edema. *disclaimer* I start my ADN program this sept so this is what I have learned on my own over the summer & not from an instructor. I hope I helped!
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    Quote from Valasca
    I thought dehydration pertained to insufficent intracellular fluid amounts...period. hypovolemia refers to insuffiecent extracellular fluid amounts. in an attempt to decrease the rising blood/solute concentration the cells will give up their intracellular fluid to the extracellular space. this causes dehydration, an insufficent amount of intracellular fluid. therfore, dehydration can be a symptom of hypovolemia when the cells lose water in an attempt to maintain homeostasis. an important side note is that b/c the brain cells also lose water IV fluids must be given slowly (over 48 hrs) to prevent rapid swelling of the cells which can cause cerebral edema. *disclaimer* I start my ADN program this sept so this is what I have learned on my own over the summer & not from an instructor. I hope I helped!

    Hmmm I wonder if we'll get a calculation for volume of fluids given per pound/kilo over a set amount of time based on different S/S? 'Cause I sure do recall a few times of being sick or with sick ones in the ED, where they just pumped ya full of fluid and kicked you out with a scrip to help slow whatever was causing the fluid loss for that person. My last trip I came out with edema from hypervolemia b/c of that kinda treatment. I guess this is why everyone on here tells us to brush up on fluids and electrolytes :chuckle.
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    Quote from feels like jd
    after trolling through a bunch of study guides i guess myabe i'm just dense. in one guide it mentions that dehydration is specifically a lack of fluid specifically intracellular. however in another one and in my text it mentions dehydration in more of a symptomatic context. any help? thanks.
    knowing principles of medical terminology would be very helpful here. i would recommend that as you do your reading you keep a medical dictionary at your side and refer to it frequently to explain these differences that seem confusing.

    dehydration is a condition that occurs when there has been excessive loss of body fluid. the nursing diagnosis for this is deficient fluid volume
    de - from, without
    hydra - water
    tion - state of being
    literally, a state of being without water
    hypovolemia refers to decreased fluid volume of the blood.
    hypo - under, beneath, below, low
    vol(umen) - volume
    emia - blood
    literally, blood volume that is low
    symptom, from greek symptoma which means occurrence; anything that has befallen someone; casualty. any perceptible change in the body or its functions that indicates disease or the kind or phases of disease. symptoms may be classified as objective, subjective, cardinal, and sometimes, constitutional. (taber's cyclopedic medical dictionary)
    sym - with, together with, along, beside
    tom (from the greek verb piptein) - to fall
    the loss of body fluids occurs first. as it continues the hypovolemia happens. some of the symptoms of dehydration are decreased urine output; increased urine concentration; weakness; sudden weight loss (except in third-spacing); decreased venous filling; increased body temperature; decreased pulse volume/pressure; change in mental state; elevated hematocrit; decreased skin/tongue turgor; dry skin/mucous membranes; thirst; increased pulse rate; decreased blood pressure. elevated hematocrit is a symptom of the hypovolemia that is going on.

    dehydration can also be part of a cascade of events of other medical conditions going on particularly if there are imbalances in the electrolytes or hormones that control fluids. for example, if a patient is developing type i diabetes, one of their presenting symptoms may be dehydration due to the attempt of their kidneys to dump the excess glucose from their body via the renal system.
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    Thanks to all that helped. After reading your responses I managed to kind of meld together of the text info I had into something I think I understand. Thanks again.


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