how to answer questions on exams in class

  1. I am looking for help on trying to remember every developmental phase in each of stages according to Pigaet for peds. I took the first exam and missed by two points to pass! I always seem to have the correct answer but go back and change it because I doubt myself! I don't know what I am doing wrong! I do everything my instructors tell me read, write notes, and think I understand the material but when I come's to the exam. I don't know I guess I am unsure of myself! Please if anybody can give me some help and stratagies I would greatly appreciate it! I only have 7 more weeks and I will graduate if I pass this class!

    Thanks
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   enfermeraSG
    The only advice that I can offer is to think "Maslow's Hierarchy". One of my instructors is on the panes that writes questions for the NCLEX, and she said always think on those terms. In other words, example: if pt doesn't have airway - nothing else matters. That that will work, if your instructors follow NCLEX style questioning anyway. Good luck. It is hard to "think like a nurse"
    SG
  4. by   Sheri257
    Quote from 3kidsmomma
    I always seem to have the correct answer but go back and change it because I doubt myself!
    I do that too, change answers. Most of the time (although not always) I originally had the right answer and change it to a wrong answer.

    The rule: never change your original answer is probably a good idea.

  5. by   3kidsmomma
    Quote from enfermeraSG
    The only advice that I can offer is to think "Maslow's Hierarchy". One of my instructors is on the panes that writes questions for the NCLEX, and she said always think on those terms. In other words, example: if pt doesn't have airway - nothing else matters. That that will work, if your instructors follow NCLEX style questioning anyway. Good luck. It is hard to "think like a nurse"
    SG
    I wish they would write questions that were similar to the NCLEX I guess that's the problem they don't.
  6. by   twinmommy+2
    Yeah, never change your first answer. Unless you are completely sure that your first answer was really wrong. If you are just unsure of yourself, then don't change it. Make yourself put the pencil down when the test is over and turn that bad boy in.
  7. by   Imafloat
    If you specifically need help remembering Piget's stages here is how I remember them. Be warned, this is just how I remember them it is kind of dumb but it works for me.

    Sensorimotor=birth-2- I always think about how babies and toddlers put everything into their mouths, they explore the world with all of their senses.

    Preoperational=3-7 years-think about mathematical operations, addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. Kids this age aren't old enough for math, hence they are preoperational

    concrete operational=7-11 years- kids this age are pretty set in their values, but like fresh concrete they aren't fully set.

    formal operational= 12 and up- algebra is very formal and this is the age you can usually start teaching it to kids. I also think about formal dances, you have to be a teenager to go to them.

    If your prof gives you examples and wants you to categorize them trust your gut and try to decide which age it would fall under. There were two things our professor stressed, these stages can't be skipped around, it is a progression in order through them, also a person has to be 15 before he/she can think in the abstract. I hope this is what you needed help with.
  8. by   RainDreamer
    I had posted this in another thread, but here are my tips for taking tests:
    (and I agree with the others, don't change your answer, always go with your first instinct!)


    I was having trouble with my exams last year, I went to talk to the Director of the program and she gave me some of the best advice. Some of the things she told me really has helped me a lot:

    Before reading the question, cover up the answers. Just read the question. Think about it. What comes to your mind? Think about what you know. Even write some things down there on the test (if you're allowed to write on the test). Then look at the answers and see what's there that fits with what first came to your mind. A lot of those answers could very well apply, but it might not apply to that certain situation in the question, therefore the distractors will throw you off. Cover the answers first!

    Secondly, look at what the question is asking. If it's a priority question, it's asking what the nurse would do first. These used to throw me off at first because they are all correct answers, in that they are all interventions that the nurse would do, BUT, it's asking which ONE of those would the nurse do first. When you get these questions, remember your ABCs. Which is the most critical? Which is top priority over all the others?

    And I know this is said so often, but read the question carefully! I have made so many mistakes on simple questions because I missed a simple part of the question. Make sure you know what the question is asking. Choose the best answer you think fits, then read the question again carefully, just to make sure.

    Don't read too much into a question. If a lot of information isn't given, then don't sit there and try to come up with more information, more than likely they're just looking for a simple answer. So many times we read the question, then start thinking of other information that could/would/maybe fit in there, and we tend going off track, therefore missing what the question is even asking! Just keep it simple. Look at what it's asking, don't go off track and look for something that's not there.

    If you read the question and just don't know it, then cross out the choices that you know for sure aren't correct. This way it eliminates your choices, and gives you a better chance in guessing correctly!

    Get a good night's sleep! I know people say that all the time, but it's so important! I used to try taking tests after staying up all night, it's just not a good thing. Getting a full 8 hours of sleep the night before a test isn't plausible for me, but I always make sure I get about 4-6 hours of sleep the night before, then I wake up 2-3 hours before the test and go over my notecards again. Eat a good breakfast and walk into that test with CONFIDENCE! That's so important .... go in there with the attitude that you will do well!
  9. by   Reddy,RN
    Rain Dreamer, I really appreciate you taking the time to write what you did. I know I'll do better on tests from here on in because of what you wrote. Thank you.

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