How much do you read and or study? - page 3

I was looking over the first semester thread and noticed that a ton of people were talking about all the reading they had to do. Are most people actually reading?? In my class (just finishing 1st... Read More

  1. by   cirthungl
    I personally do not read alot. I just use this as a reference. My instructor made it clear from the begining that she is not big on tests. She uses your clinical performance as more of a basis for what you know. Although I am only a b student. It does seem to me that most of the people who study hard do not do as well on tests. I think they may cloud there mind with knowledge that will not be on the test.
  2. by   FuturoEnfermera
    Quote from cirthungl
    it does seem to me that most of the people who study hard do not do as well on tests. i think they may cloud there mind with knowledge that will not be on the test.
    i totally agree. they seem to memorize so much pointless info and lose the ability to process through a question.
  3. by   FuturoEnfermera
    Quote from ♪♫ in my ♥
    if i score anything less than 100% then i have not worked hard enough.

    my goal is to master the material, not to simply get a given grade. when i learn the material, the grades take care of themselves. i am preparing for a career and i do not want to limit myself by not working as hard as i'm able and learning just as much as i possibly can.
    what semester are you in? i know i was the same way as far as score standards (expecting i had to get over 100% and upset it i didn't get all the extra credit) before i entered the program. but, at least in my program, the questions are subjective and reading and studying doesn't have the same effect. you have to know how to prioritize and also read the mind of your professors!! what do you do first? a) make sure the patient is not agitated or b) make sure the patient is restful. hmm i was thinking that was the same thing but i guess agitated sounds worse than unrestful. can't study for that kind of annoying question.
  4. by   lifeizgood
    Hello, I just finished two pre-requisites for LPN. I studied and read the chapters. More so because I had the time to do so. Next semester I'm going full time, I have a family to take care of, and I am the sole provider of my household. How possible is it to work 25 hours a week and be in the LPN program?
  5. by   SarasotaRN2b
    Quote from sistermike
    Tiffany,

    I was the same way before nursing school. I was maintaining a GPA near perfect and even the first part of my first semester was spent with me reading everything and trying to "ace" the exams.

    I have since changed my ways. I now focus on learning concepts and learning as much as possible during clinicals. I also took on a nurse apprentice job so I can learn that way. I will be honest and say I barely study anymore. I only really study is the night before an exam I will look over my notes and the morning of my exams i will look over my notes. And I manage decent grades (this semester I received an A-, B+, & B.. good enough for me!). Classmates always ask me, "how are maintaining those kind of grades and not studying that often?". It is because everything has started "clicking" when I stopped focusing on trying to "ace" everything. I have started putting 2 and 2 together and started "critically thinking" about situations and applying all of the knowledge I have to that scenario. And so far it is working out great for me!
    You raise some very valid points. I'm coming in (start January) with a strong GPA and though I would like to keep up this trend, it is more important that I learn the concepts and understand them versus just trying to study for tests.

    Kris
  6. by   vashtee
    Honestly, I don't suggest looking for too many shortcuts initially. It is true you need to understand concepts, but I find that reading the book helps to enhance comprehension of the pathophysiology, and perhaps more importantly WHY certain treatments and interventions work. Besides, as many people have pointed out, the instructors are known to pull test questions directly from the book, word for word.

    Sometimes the reading we have been assigned is repetitive (especially in Pharmacology), in which case I just read from a single source.
  7. by   rnmomtobe2010
    I am learning with pre-req's that if I skim, I do well, but if I read, read and read, I flunk everything. As long as I have outlines and take good notes, that is all I need. It took me some time to figure that out, but I have got the hang of things now!!
  8. by   2bnursenikki82
    I think it will REALLY depend on your instructor. I've had some where their questions come out of the book and they only lecture on broad concepts. I've had some where their questions come directly out of their lecture notes and if you read the book you get confused. I've had a few where their questions come from the study guide they "recommend" you get at the beginning of the semester.

    My advice...if your instructor goes so far as to as to mention a specific NCLEX guide BY NAME...go get it. Chances are they also use it as a guide and it will be helpful. I've gotten half of my (rather large) collection that way.

    Good luck!
  9. by   akspudus
    Quote from 2bnursenikki82
    My advice...if your instructor goes so far as to as to mention a specific NCLEX guide BY NAME...go get it. Chances are they also use it as a guide and it will be helpful. I've gotten half of my (rather large) collection that way.

    Good luck!
    VERY TRUE!! When I was taking fundamentals, our instructor recommended Fundamentals Success: A Course Review Applying Critical Thinking to Test Taking. I went ahead and bought it...and by the end of the semester it looked like it had been drug through hell and back...with every color of PostIt note coming out of every nook and cranny. I tend to skim through a lot of the reading material in the textbook....then take that sections quiz in the study guide. The answer section of the guide illustrated why a particular answer was right and why the other answers were wrong. It didn't take long with the quiz to realize whether I understood the subject matter...or if I better go back and read the text section. By the time you get to an exam in class...you will know how well you will do on it.
    That along with good note reviews the morning before an exam....led to a 98% overall in the course.

    akspudus
  10. by   ILRN200
    I did not read too much first sem., Now I read and re-read quite a bit.

    I hate feeling guilty for not reading something I know i really should. The textbooks are better now I guess!
  11. by   oneofHIs
    The people in my study group call me Queen nerd because I do study so much. Yet, they all want to study with me. So far, first semester, my instructors have gone pretty much by the syllabus. I read what is outlined, highlight in class what they mention, take notes in class, go home and rewrite my notes (since I have to write so fast to keep up), so that in itself is at least 3 different times and 3 different ways (seeing, hearing, and writing) I am getting the material. When I rewrite my notes I also make note cards at the same time, study as the course goes along, so I don't have to cram before an exam. So far I have all A's. Works for me. We also have a group of about 6 of us that get together before each test and we quiz each other with the note cards we have all made.

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