How many of us are under 25? - page 3

Hi, I was just wondering how many people were under the age of 25. I guess it would be nice to know that others my age are going through this. Just write in and tell everyone a little about yourself... Read More

  1. by   highasthesky
    Mind me asking how long the ADN programs are? I read in someones post that you could take the RN test after graduating, does that mean that if you passed the test that you'd be an RN then? Excuse all of the questions, I'm just trying to figure out the best route to go with my education. Thanks for any help! Sandy
  2. by   rachaelm4
    The ADN program I'm attending is 2 full years for the full time program, or 3 years for the part time program. After you graduate school, you then go and take your test to become a RN. My school is through a hospital, if I went through the local community college I would have to take alot of preqs before going on into the nursing program. I hope this helps.
  3. by   strangelilnurse
    Highasthesky, ADN programs are designed to be able to be completed within 2 years (by law they have to be to be considered an associate degree). However, I don't know many people who are actually able to get the 4 semesters of nursing and all the pre/co-requisites of the program in 2 years. Most spend atleast a year trying to get some basic courses out of the way. Some (like myself) will play catch up during the summer semesters. Generally, I think you can expect to spend atleast 3 years working on this if you count EVERYTHING that has to be done.

    I don't claim to be the high authority on this matter, so anyone else that has an opinion, feel free to contradict me.
  4. by   old-master
    I am also 25yrs and will be in nursing school in 03. I am married to another college student and have a 2yr old daughter. This is my third major since high school! (history, phys, and now nursing.)
    However, when I started work at a Detox center, and the LVN thought I would make a great RN, I knew in my heart that it was to be so. So, I bought used text books and studied.
    I really wish that I wanted to be an RN years ago, so that now I would have had my RN. However, I feel that is the right time and then was not. You cannot force anything that is not might to be. Or you will not like the out come.

    So, it the will of the Force that I be come a nurse now, and not then.
    old-master has spoken......
  5. by   amy
    ...
    Last edit by amy on Jul 3, '02
  6. by   highasthesky
    Thanks Rachael and strangelilnurse, that answers my questions perfectly and tells me exactly what I wanted to know!
  7. by   Rainagrey
    Hey guys, great idea for a thread. I'm at a community college in a rich-as-you-can-believe neighborhood in Massachustetts (which has it's own irony all in itself), but I'm 19, two years out of college, and in my second semester in an ADN program. I kind of like being the "youngin" actually. I just try to keep my mouth shut and not be a punk about how young I am. I think the oldest member of my class is in her forties, and nearly everybody is a mom (or dad!). I dunno, I picked nursing school over a "regular" 4 year college experience, so that now when my friends come home from college . . . I dunno, we just don't get along as well. They think I'm wasting my time, energy, and talent, and I think they're wasting their parents money. I actually had one friend (who goes to Brown) say to me "Nursing school? But you had such high hopes in high school!!" Arrrrgh. Anybody else feelin my pain here?
  8. by   calililly
    Just thought I'd throw in the sunglasses for California...

    Anyways, I am 24 y/o, newly married (May 2001) and less than 1 week away from starting semester number 2 of nursing school. My long-term goal is to become a Nurse Coroner (a bit more morbid than most of the posts I perused, I admit, but somebody's gotta do it!) Forensic nursing fascinates me and really captures and keeps my interest.

    I am a Pharmacy Technician and an EMT in addition to being a student. I always knew that I wanted to go into the medical field, and I am very excited and motivated to become a nurse. I live in Thousand Oaks, California (that's about 20 miles northwest of Los Angeles), and grew up in Pacific Palisades, California (just south of Malibu). I like California, but I want to move after I become a nurse, perhaps to the South.

    I really am glad that I found this bulletin board and I think it's great that students from all over the country/world can communicate here. I look forward to 'meeting' all of you!



    calililly

    p.s.

    old-master, i LOVE your avatar (or whatever that little picture thing is called)...mr. burns is my favourite!!

    p.p.s.

    rainagrey,

    my mom wanted me to go to medical school and was SO BUMMED when i decided on nursing. didn't have the patience, didn't want to deal with the competition, didn't want to be 100 grand in debt, didn't want to be a doctor. i feel the pain...
    Last edit by calililly on Feb 1, '02
  9. by   Brown Suga
    Well I am a 23 y/o attending an ADN nursing program planning on graduating in Dec 02 or May03. The program I am in was planning on fast tracking during the summer months, but for now the summer is tentative. I live at home with my parents and have classmates who are jealous of me for still living at home. Most of them wish they still lived at home. I don't have any children. I plan on going into L&D or telemetry after I graduate. Well best wishes to all fellow and future nurses.

    Marlita
  10. by   Brownbetty
    I am under 25!! I have a BS in Biology and in July of 2002 I will have my BSN. I am currently in an accelerated nursing program at JHU which is grueling but doable (is that a word?). The program is 13 months from June to July of the next year. I am not married or have any children. Just eager for July 19th
  11. by   Eric01
    My name is Eric. I'm 21 now and will be 23 when I graduate. I'm at UNB in Canada. Currently in a serious relationship with a great fellow student. Most of my classmates are between 19 (fresh out of high school) and about 45, though the majority are on the younger side.
  12. by   AmieRN
    Hey ladies (and possibly some gentlemen?): I am currently 23 and I have been an RN for almost two years now. So, if you do the math, I was 21 when I graduated with a BSN in nursing. It is difficult being taken serious by people, staff, patients, whoever. I have taken care of someone all day long, and told them I was their nurse as soon as I walked in the door, and then at the end of twelve hours listen to them tell their family that I'm a STUDENT.

    I am taking classes to complete my master's degree at OSU, I am going to specialize in the Family Nurse Practitioner program and eventually obtain my PhD and teach new nurses. The most important thing for us young nurses, and nurses to be, is that age is just a number, and good nursing skills do not always come with age. Don't let people tell you that being a good nurse is impossible if you're young. I've seen some people that have been nurses for CENTURIES who couldn't treat someone appropriately if the just had a cold

    Keep workin' --Ames
  13. by   frannybee
    Hey, ,all you youthful nursie chappies!

    I'm in that limbo that strikes after teenagerhood and before grownupness...poor choice of words but you all know what I mean. From early childhood I had two career options - the first was to be a professional Euphonium player in the UK, and the second was to be a nurse. Being the ultimate procrastinator and underachiever, I didn't practice enough to get good enough to play professionally, and ended up taking 2 years out from studies to work in a nursing home and get my head together.

    It was there I discovered I was good at something else - making people smile and feel better about themselves. (I also make a dammn fine pot of tea). After lots of serious consideration, I decided to combine my talents with my morbid fascination with human biology and disease and went back to uni. In 2000 I completed a Bachelor of Nursing and emerged as an RN with a Workplace Health and Safety Officer qualification to boot. I then did what all serious career-minded grads do. I left the country.

    I met Jim in a tiny mining town on a prac placement and followed him (and my heart) from Australia to the UK. I've been here a year now and have been qualified for the same length of time. I work agency full-time but do most of my shifts on a neursurgical ITU/HDU. I'm quite passionate about it and although I know next to nothing, I'd love to learn more and specialise.

    I'm always the youngest at the agency meetings and parties. People tend to look out for me, which is sweet. It can get a little stifling when people assume that youth = stupid/incompetent and insist on showing me the 'right way' to do things. Generally, I like it. There's plenty of time for me to get older and wiser and bitter and twisted. I'll enjoy my youth and my nursing while I can

    Fran

close