How many hours did you honesty spend studying in nursing school?

  1. Hello,
    I've been wanting to ask those who graduated nursing school, how many hours did you honestly spend studying? I heard people studying for about 5-6 hours a day which to me sounds like too much. But then I also heard people studying about 1-2 hours a day which sounds fair. And also, when clinicals start, do you study less or more than you did in the beginning of nursing school?
    Thanks
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  2. 41 Comments

  3. by   newnurseme9999
    Double the amount of time spent in class!
  4. by   Noctor_Durse
    I'm in second semester, I have straight As and I literally don't open my book, study outside of class or even print the notes out. I've been sleep walking thriugh this program thus far. Nursing school is tons of fun but it's not hard and I dont really need to study any of the info.
  5. by   FuturePsychNP21
    Quote from Noctor_Durse
    I'm in second semester, I have straight As and I literally don't open my book, study outside of class or even print the notes out. I've been sleep walking thriugh this program thus far. Nursing school is tons of fun but it's not hard and I dont really need to study any of the info.
    Lol good luck with the NCLEX then
  6. by   jodispamodi
    I didnt study all that much, but I took very detailed notes during class and if I wrote it down I remembered it. I usually made a point rereading all my notes a couple times a week. All in all probably 2-3 hrs a week ( some classes I had to sell my books back at midsemester so I had gas money to get to school and clinicals). I also worked off of this motto I know what I know and I know what I don't, so I always concentrated on the stuff I didn't know if that makes sense.
  7. by   Serhilda
    It entirely depends on the program you're in and the professors you're dealt. From my experience, the higher the passing rate of a particular program, the harder the exams and the more you can expect to study. Never be the person that "never cracks open the book" though, no matter how decent you do on exams. To be blunt, if you're not having to study a little everyday and do most of the reading to make an A on an exam, the program is likely too easy and won't prepare you for NCLEX.
  8. by   jodispamodi
    I'd disagree with that, my program was fairly difficult, considered the best in a major city with multiple major teaching hospitals. We lost at least 1/4 of our class to flunking out. I was the only one in my class to pass the HESI on the first try and I passed NCLEX in less than 40 minutes on 75 questions. And our school pass rate was 95%
    Perhaps it is better to think about what kind of background and ability to assimilate information a person has in regards to studying. I know some people in my class who had to study constantly to comprehend basic material, and I know others who didn't have to study quite as much. Just because someone spends 10 hours a night studying doesn't mean someone will understand the material and just because someone spends less time doesn't mean they don't.
  9. by   elijahvegas
    if it wasn't gone over in class or i dont remember from lecture, i got the question wrong. didnt read any of my books. and this isn't an attempt to brag or anything like that, i just realized my learning style a long long time ago.

    i for the life of me cannot stand reading textbooks. ive seriously fallen asleep within a couple pages in. and this was on any subject. ive always been an extremely slow reader so that never helped me any either. i found that i retain very well things that i hear, and if i actually understand it, ive got it for life.

    so i relied mostly on lectures, maybe a few slides, and study groups where we all bounced around ideas and concepts. and for that, it was probably a few hrs a week per test.
  10. by   Lauraann15
    I think it is honestly how you absorb information while in class and how well you adjust to the NCLEX/nursing school testing style. I have all A's (so far) in nursing school but I don't beat myself up with studying, which can be even more damaging to your mental well being After class, I usually take a small break and then review what we went over in class that day. I then look ahead to see what assignments are due, etc. to get them out of the way. Usually a week before an exam, I will start reviewing everything that is needed. I also use the NCLEX RN Mastery app to practice test questions. Great resource to get yourself familiar with NCLEX style questions and most importantly, read the explanations/reasoning that go along with the answers (very important). Overall, everyone will tell you something different in regards to how much they studied. Just need to find the amount of studing that works for you!
  11. by   Noctor_Durse
    Quote from Amcdade
    Lol good luck with the NCLEX then
    I'm scoring level 3s on my ATI and i have a 99% change of passing my NCLEX as of now.
  12. by   FuturePsychNP21
    Quote from Noctor_Durse
    I'm scoring level 3s on my ATI and i have a 99% change of passing my NCLEX as of now.
    And you are only in second semester and not done with second semester yet. Classes get harder. So, like I said, good luck with the NCLEX. Also, even if you do pass the NCLEX I personally wouldn't want a nurse taking care of me who didn't care to put any time into learning how to care for me. Book smart does not translate to good nursing and your attitude of not needing to try is setting you up for failure before you even begin
  13. by   37changes
    Noctor_Durse is an extraordinary individual who is passionate about learning and has made a concentrated effort to educate himself through a variety of avenues prior to, and in addition to, nursing school. In order to have the same experience, I think one would have to be as inquisitive and motivated as he has been *beforehand*.

    To me, this question is a lot like asking us "how much do you weigh"? You will get a huge variety of answers, and they are all dependent on so many individual factors.

    My approach has been to imagine and prepare for the worst. Wrap your head around nursing school taking 100% of everything you have, because it very well could. If you get there and find that things come a little easier to you than others, if you have a little more free time -- great. But certainly don't count on it, because that is not the reality for many.
  14. by   Noctor_Durse
    Quote from Amcdade
    And you are only in second semester and not done with second semester yet. Classes get harder. So, like I said, good luck with the NCLEX. Also, even if you do pass the NCLEX I personally wouldn't want a nurse taking care of me who didn't care to put any time into learning how to care for me. Book smart does not translate to good nursing and your attitude of not needing to try is setting you up for failure before you even begin
    I don't formally study but I am constantly chopping it up and talking shop with critical care and rapid response nurses. If you look at some of my past posts you can get an idea of where I am mentally and what I am referring to; and how I have made my nursing school experience so stress free. I have lots of tips and tricks to make it fun and not scary. I know it can sounds offensive that I don't "study" and I will make a bad nurse because I "don't care" but that is quite far from my the reality.

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