How Long Do You Study - page 2

I am a new LPN student and was just wondering....how much time do you spend studying? I spent 5 hours a day in class 5 days a week and generally study 4-5 hours a day studying. I have five subjects -... Read More

  1. by   RNsoon!
    Im a pre-nursing student and I study about 2-4 hours a day..
  2. by   BoonersmomRN
    To be honest- when I start a semester I study like a crazy woman until I can figure out how my instructor tests.

    That has led me to study anywhere from HOURS to little bits by the end of the semester. I always ALWAYS make sure I understand the material.....just SOME instructors are a lot more in DEPTH than others.
  3. by   April1986
    Ah the big question...to study or not to study... or more appropriately how much to study......The BSc.N. program that I am in uses a different teaching technique for the nursing courses, called context based learning (CBL) We get a scenario Ex. Mrs. Jones, 90, had a THA two days ago, no family close by, fell in rehab. three weeks ago. yadda yadda. Anyways, one nursing class is based around about 5 of these scenarios. For each one we have to brainstorm all of the different areas that we need to know about for a particular scenario ex. the pharmacology, nursing scope of practice. and figure out how it applies to the scenario. Then the topics are split up between the 20 people in the class and we all are responsible for presenting our (accurate and up to date) research on our topic to the class and we have discussions about each topic as well. Each scenario usually require about 4-8 hours of research and writing. Some people take a lot more time, some less. It's actually a really interesting process. Only nursing (theory) classes are like this and we have 2 seven week blocks of them each program year. We have traditional clinical courses (2 seven week blocks each program year) and also other "support" or "pre-req" type courses. Support courses like A&P are traditional lecture style courses that require studying on your own time. I'd say for each class hour of support courses I spend about equal time studying/working on them. For nursing classes it's really hard to study because a lot of the focus is on critical thinking skills, so yeah you need to know your pharmacology and pathophysiology and stuff, but with the vast amount of material that is covered in a scenario, it is so hard to actually sit down and study, or know what to study. I feel like if I have a good grasp of the scenario material and the group discussions, studying seems pointless. Either I'll know it when I get in there or I won't so I try not to stress too much about hours put in studying. We put in 11 hours a week of class time for a CBL nursing class plus support classes and studying. You can't think about it too much or you just end up feeling wayyyyy overwhelmed.
    April
  4. by   solumedrol
    Quote from April1986
    Ah the big question...to study or not to study... or more appropriately how much to study......The BSc.N. program that I am in uses a different teaching technique for the nursing courses, called context based learning (CBL) We get a scenario Ex. Mrs. Jones, 90, had a THA two days ago, no family close by, fell in rehab. three weeks ago. yadda yadda. Anyways, one nursing class is based around about 5 of these scenarios. For each one we have to brainstorm all of the different areas that we need to know about for a particular scenario ex. the pharmacology, nursing scope of practice. and figure out how it applies to the scenario. Then the topics are split up between the 20 people in the class and we all are responsible for presenting our (accurate and up to date) research on our topic to the class and we have discussions about each topic as well. Each scenario usually require about 4-8 hours of research and writing. Some people take a lot more time, some less. It's actually a really interesting process. Only nursing (theory) classes are like this and we have 2 seven week blocks of them each program year. We have traditional clinical courses (2 seven week blocks each program year) and also other "support" or "pre-req" type courses. Support courses like A&P are traditional lecture style courses that require studying on your own time. I'd say for each class hour of support courses I spend about equal time studying/working on them. For nursing classes it's really hard to study because a lot of the focus is on critical thinking skills, so yeah you need to know your pharmacology and pathophysiology and stuff, but with the vast amount of material that is covered in a scenario, it is so hard to actually sit down and study, or know what to study. I feel like if I have a good grasp of the scenario material and the group discussions, studying seems pointless. Either I'll know it when I get in there or I won't so I try not to stress too much about hours put in studying. We put in 11 hours a week of class time for a CBL nursing class plus support classes and studying. You can't think about it too much or you just end up feeling wayyyyy overwhelmed.
    April
    true to that. just the material we need to read for theory is so much! do you like doing those case studies? why do Canadian nursing schools focuses so much on theory and critical thinking? plus, we also need to do our readings on other req'd courses such A&P, Physical Examination & Health Assessment, Nursing Practice, Nutrition, Psychology, Pharmacology, Pathology. ITS TOO MUCH READING!!
  5. by   April1986
    Narcotic Junkie, what school are you at, if you don't mind me asking? I am in a transfer program at Grant Macewan College in Edmonton, which tranfers to the University of Alberta for years three and four. Anywho, I don't know why Canadian schools have chosen to focus so much on critical thinking and stuff. In the end I think it makes us excellent nurses because we can deal with anything, not just what we learn exactly in school. It is really hard sometimes, but in the end it's all worth it. *Should practice what she preaches* That said sometimes I think I'm going to rip my own arm off and beat myself over the head with it. I like doing the case studies because it's like you are dealing with a real person, not just "F/90, total hip arthroplasty, yadda yadda" it gives you a sense of the context of this person's life and how you can provide nursing care beyond the physical. There is always so much to cover but they seem to provide adequately fair testing for it anyways. Class averages are usually between 74% and 76%, so not too bad.
    April
  6. by   pegbord
    I am in BSN program and have never, I mean NEVER felt this much pressure in my life!! I study until the onset of nystagmus!! (just kidding - but with the whirlwind in my head, sure feels like it!)
  7. by   rags
    I went to school in the US not Canada but we did case studies as well and presented them by power point. I loved 'em. loved 'em loved 'em loved 'em!
    :1luvu:
  8. by   NaomieRN
    I am a first year nursing student, I study about 15 hours a week.
  9. by   SmetRN2008
    I'm a first year student and in the fundamentals. I study usually 1-2 hrs a day, so definently not excessively. I usually take one day off a week where I don't study at all and just spend time with my daughter and husband. I don't think the fundamentals is bad at all. I'm getting an A so far. But I know next semester will probably be a rude awakening!
  10. by   luv2shopp85
    I'm in my second year of nursing school.. 7 months left! At the beginning of hte semester I always study the least. Id on't know what it is. But I have to get a barely passing grade on an exam or failing by 2 points in order to get my ass into gear. This has hapepned since I started nursing school. I do bad at the beginning and really good at the end. If tehre is no quiz or exam that week I will jsut read over all of my notes. If there is a quiz or exam I study about 4-6 hours a day, more on weekends. I make sure I understand the material which is KEY. I read my textbook, read my incredibly made easy books and read my notes in order to clarify things.

    Then I do about 200-300 nclex questions on the material i am learning. IT really helps reenforce it by reading athe rational and all that.

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