How important is it to get a BSN? - page 3

I often hear about how important it is to get a BSN, and that a lot of hospitals are often looking for new grads who have a BSN degree, as that's something that they're trying to phase in. I was... Read More

  1. by   matcha-cat
    Quote from Reyn04
    ADDED NOTE!!!

    If and when you go back to school, make SURE the program is accredited!! If its not, hospitals will not accept your degree & the time & effort is for nothing. Buyer beware.
    Haha, thanks for your "added note".. I'll be sure to do that And thanks to everyone who left advice! I never second-guessed getting my BSN, I was just toying with the idea of taking a break, to start a family, but I need to get off my lazy bum and get my degree.
  2. by   rbekt2005
    I graduated from a diploma program in 1983. I took additional classes and graduated from the university with a B.A. In 1984. I never had any regrets not having a BSN until last year. I was passed over for a promotion because of not having a BSN. I have worked 27 years in ER/ICUs, and have been in a charge nurse role for 10 years. I plan to retire within the next 6 years, so I am not going to spend the money to get a BSN. But I encouraged any younger nurse out there to pursue it
  3. by   llg
    Quote from rbekt2005
    I graduated from a diploma program in 1983. I took additional classes and graduated from the university with a B.A. In 1984. I never had any regrets not having a BSN until last year. I was passed over for a promotion because of not having a BSN. I have worked 27 years in ER/ICUs, and have been in a charge nurse role for 10 years. I plan to retire within the next 6 years, so I am not going to spend the money to get a BSN. But I encouraged any younger nurse out there to pursue it
    Thank you for sharing your story. Some people with your history might have said simply that they had been a good nurse for many years without a BSN and leave it at that. Your story illustrates how even "good nurses" can be passed over for opportunities if they don't have the credentials that employers want today. What worked well in the past may not be sufficient for the future -- and a nurse entering the profession today needs to prepare for the future, not the past.

    Thank you.
  4. by   she244
    At 61 years old I do not plan to go for a BSN degree. I may become unemployable when I retire and that is okay. I will do something else. The schools I have looked at, the cost would be at least $10, 000. I have a lot of nursing skills and training. Picc Line insertion under Ultrasound, Spirometry Testing, Casting and Splinting Injuries, along with IV skills. I do encourage when asked that yes, going for a BSN is a good idea. Not sure I agree with the study that BSN nurses have better outcomes since I have worked with so many LPN's, ADN RN's and even MA's who provide excellent care and are top notch nurses. And yes, most Hospitals are requiring BSN degrees to get hired. What I found out when I asked, is there an increase in pay once I obtain a BSN degree and the answer has always been No!. Since I make a higher salary that the BSN Nurses being hired for me it would be for personal satisfaction. I do ever want to do management or supervision again. I look to retire in the next few years so who knows I may have to work for an Insurance Company handling prior authorizations or something. I have a lot of experience from the medical side in obtaining prior authorizations so hopefully I would be employable in the area.
  5. by   AmberK1026
    I just graduated with my ADN in May at 42 yrs old. I was able to get a job on a PP floor but I had applied for a few NICU positions and was likely not hired because I didn't have my BSN. I had hoped that my experience as a NICU mom of 26 week twin boys (one who passed away at 3 days old and the other spent 3.5 months in the NICU) might give me an edge but no such luck. I do plan on going back for my BSN as soon as Im eligible for tuition reimbursement through my employer.
  6. by   amanda82003
    I would say it is important but how important depends on the area you live in. In CA it is very important. Maybe not as important in other states? I have no idea since CA is where I am going to school and will be working.
  7. by   amanda82003
    I am not a manager anymore (over 10 years of business administration) or even a nurse yet - but common sense to me would say that large amounts of on the job experience should always trump a degree. Even though I am going the BSN route, nothing and I mean nothing beats being in the trenches taking grenades everyday. Clearly my personal opinion but seem logical as well
  8. by   Shookclays
    Simply get your ADN/AAS/ASN and become an RN and then immediately start an RN-BSN program. Most are 8 months to a year depending on your pace and they're online. By the time you finish with your associates you should know which college you want to attend for your RN-BSN. I don't see why anyone would wait. Most of those degrees can be paid out of pocket.

    Also you won't have to worry about "catching up" if you would like to further your education. You will already have that BSN so you only have to apply to grad school.

    I don't know how old you are but I just turned 22, & I'm in second level (ASN) and I'm not stopping.

    So many older nurses tell me and encourage me to "do it while you're young". By the time I'm 27 I want to be done with nursing grad school (Doctor of Nursing Practice).

    Good luck
    Last edit by Shookclays on Jul 22 : Reason: iPhone correction ugh
  9. by   audreysmagic
    In this job market, with the push for BSN pretty much taking over, I'd encourage any ADN student to go right for the BSN. I'm not against ADN programs by any means; I graduated from an excellent one and hope to teach there someday. Some of the best nurses I know are ADNs. But they're also not just starting out. Definitely take the NCLEX, get a job and that critical one year of experience, but continue on, even if it means part-time classes. I made the mistake of not doing that, figuring I'd just take a "break" from school and go back, and...well, that break turned into over 10 years. I'm in an RN-MSN bridge program now and loving it, but I've also been frustrated so many times by dream jobs I wasn't considered for because I didn't have a BSN.
  10. by   blackmamba123
    I think whether or not you get a BSN depends on your career and financial goals. If you want to be eligible for leadership or administrative roles, which usually involve a raise, you'll want your BSN or beyond. Now, there are some magnet hospitals, and hospitals in various areas that require RN's to have a BSN. There still are many opportunities for ADN nurses to work in community hospitals and other settings, and even for advancement. It just seems like in order to advance with an ADN, you need more years of experience under your belt. Ofcourse, that all depends on the state you live in and the type of nurse that you are. I live in Texas, and jobs are plentiful here for BSN and ADN nurses. Specifically in Houston, most facilities in the medical center require a BSN. But community hospitals will hire ADN nurses and even pay for your BSN with a 2-3 year post degree commitment. The demand for critical care nurses is going to be much higher than nurses who work in women's health, and so on. What's my short answer? Get your BSN. Yes, it is important, because it allows for the most options and better pay. Best wishes.
  11. by   DalekRN
    Get the BSN asap. It's becoming the minimum standard.
  12. by   RNintheBay
    It's very important to get a BSN. It opens up more opportunities and makes you more employable. Some nurse jobs require a Masters nowadays! I have been a nurse interviewer for state hospitals in the past, although its not required certain managers honestly prefer to hire the BSN. Some hospitals pay a little more for the higher degree too. Some people may not agree, but I feel those who graduate from a good BSN program have more effective leadership skills.
  13. by   Racer15
    Where I live? It's not really that important. HOWEVER, I am currently working on my BSN for three reasons. 1. My hospital pays up to $8,000 in tuition for a BSN. If I can complete my program in a year, I've earned a degree for free. 2. I get a decent raise upon completion. 3. If I ever decide to move up or out of my area, a BSN will give me more opportunities. It was a no brainer for me. I did have to sign a two year contract with my hospital, but it's worth it to me.

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