How bad will it really be?

  1. Hi everyone! I'm just starting my nursing journey. I'm starting my prereq's this summer so hopefully I'll be able to start an accelerated BSN program in June 2005. I keep reading about how intense everything is, and I'm starting to wonder if I can handle it. I have an excellent GPA from when I got my bachelors degree in accounting last year (WHY did I do that??? I'm the last person who should be an accountant ), so I know how to study and how to work hard, but I think this is going to be harder than accounting.

    I'm married with an 8 year old daughter, and my husband is super supportive, but I'm starting to worry about money and time. The program will take me 15 months, I found a hospital that will pay for tuition, but during that time I won't be able to work more than part time. We can't afford to live on my husband's income. Can anyone tell me how much time I'm really likely to need to budget for studying, so I can figure out how much I can work? I also don't want to spend my entire life either working or at school, that would be *really* hard on my daughter (and me!).

    Thank you so much for any advice you can offer me...I've been reading these boards for days, I'm learning so much!

    Rebecca
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  2. 15 Comments

  3. by   CaterpillarGirl
    I'm just bumping this thread up, since I would like to know the same. I also am finishing my pre reqs, the time taken for that isn't a concern, as I've been at it for a year, and know what to expect. The actual program? now thats a different story. I will also have to work part time. I have a four year old, and an extremely supportive boyfriend (whom we live with), but he's in school too, so can't work full time either.
  4. by   manna
    You could probably ask the school where you're applying to the accelerated BSN what they recommend as far as study hours/work hours. From what I've heard people mention of the accelerated programs here, I think they'd prefer you not work at all (but I understand how difficult it is to try to "get by" in school without an income, or with a limited income).
  5. by   marilynmom
    Good question because it's something I am concerned about as well.

    I am married and have 2 kids and homeschool (full time job there) so it's a good question. I am used to working hard but I want to know how much time it is really going to take. I could possible start nursing school in the fall.

    Marilyn
  6. by   shyne
    I'm in my 2nd semester at an ADN program and it is hard. The biggest challenge is time management and staying organized. Anyone can do it as long as your willing to sacrifice the time and energy. As for working, I wouldn't recommend it unless you have to. However, I do work every Sat and Sun part-time though. I just study for a hour after work and study for about 2 hrs each day during the week. So far it's working fine for me!

    Good Luck and you can do it!
  7. by   Jen2
    I agree with Shyne. I am also in my second semester of a ADN program and time management is key. During pre-reqs I worked full time with no problems. Once I was accepted into the nursing program, I now work every Monday, I have school all day Tuesday, Wednesday afternoon, Thursday is my clinical day, I work every Friday, and every other weekend. It's rough, but I do it. During the week I try to spend at least two hours every evening studying, however on my weekend off I probably spend a good six to eight hours doing readings and studying notes.

    It depends on how bad you want it. I have sacrificed many hours of sleep and now find that I can function on 3-4 hours, especially the night before clinicals (lots of pre-planning). You will amaze yourself once you get started. Good luck to you and let us know what you decide.
  8. by   RN_N_05
    I agree, I think time management is key. There is no doubt that nursing school is tough. I'm in a BSN program, so the first 1 1/2 wasn't too bad (mainly pre-reqs). The toughtest was micro and A&P. Now that I'm in my second semester of "actual" nursing classes, it's really tough. I'm lucky in the sense that I don't have to work. I know people that can manage to work about 30 hours a week, but they are very disciplined in their studying. It also depends on how well you retain/learn info. If you can remeber most stuff from lecture and just skim over the chapters, it wil take a lot less time. Since there are a ton of pages to read, if you have to do that it will, of course, take longer. There's not really much else I can think of, just try to stay on top of assignments. Once you get behind, you're constantly playing catch up. Good Luck!
  9. by   memphispanda
    Mom of three--just graduated in December--maybe my story will help a little? Just for info, my first full-time check was more than what my DH brings in, and he has been at his job 8 years so we really couldn't make it easily on one income.

    I worked full time the first semester of nursing courses. Because I was done with all the other classes, I only had 7 credit hours to take that semester. The next semester and a half I didn't work at all--too much time needed in clinical and studying. Then I started externing on a VERY part-time basis. We were required to work 12 hours every two weeks. Sometimes it was hard to get those 12 hours in--but then I am one who might be able to function ok after one night of little sleep, but more than one turns me into a clumsy, confused, bumbling fool.

    I took out loans to pay for school (we have student loan payback at work). I took out additional loans for daycare and household expenses--I ended up with about twice the average debt of people graduating at my school. But it is all eligible for loan payback.
  10. by   angel337
    Quote from rebeccalizzie
    Hi everyone! I'm just starting my nursing journey. I'm starting my prereq's this summer so hopefully I'll be able to start an accelerated BSN program in June 2005. I keep reading about how intense everything is, and I'm starting to wonder if I can handle it. I have an excellent GPA from when I got my bachelors degree in accounting last year (WHY did I do that??? I'm the last person who should be an accountant ), so I know how to study and how to work hard, but I think this is going to be harder than accounting.

    I'm married with an 8 year old daughter, and my husband is super supportive, but I'm starting to worry about money and time. The program will take me 15 months, I found a hospital that will pay for tuition, but during that time I won't be able to work more than part time. We can't afford to live on my husband's income. Can anyone tell me how much time I'm really likely to need to budget for studying, so I can figure out how much I can work? I also don't want to spend my entire life either working or at school, that would be *really* hard on my daughter (and me!).

    Thank you so much for any advice you can offer me...I've been reading these boards for days, I'm learning so much!

    Rebecca
    every person is different as far as study habits go. i have a bsn and i worked full time (3 12's a week) mostly the entire time. the last semester i had to stop working completely because it became too much. nursing school IS challenging and if you don't have to work don't. you have to study every day to be successful in nursing school. some classes are easier than others, but overall it's hard work. you can do it. it is not impossible, just stay focused on your goal.
  11. by   belladelicious
    I don't see how people work and are in nursing school. Many of the people in my group are married, and several do have children. I only know of 3 people that work, and they work part time...and they have children too. I think on weekends, maybe a few nights. You could always cut down on your class load, but then again, it'll take you longer to graduate. Another thing...nursing school is expensive. All the equipment,books,uniforms,it really adds up. For me, it's been so much more expensive than my previous 2 pre-req years. So add that into your budget too. But, try to find a way around working, or work very little I'd say.
  12. by   studentnurse74
    This is how it's supposed to be at my school: I went to the info. session, and they said you should figure 2 hours a week for each course. Our first semester, we take 15 credit hours (5 classes), so it would be 10 hours study time. HTH
  13. by   RN_N_05
    Quote from studentnurse74
    This is how it's supposed to be at my school: I went to the info. session, and they said you should figure 2 hours a week for each course. Our first semester, we take 15 credit hours (5 classes), so it would be 10 hours study time. HTH

    At my school they tell us 2-3 hours per course credit hour. Since most courses are 3 credit hours and generally 5 classes that means about 30 hours of studying per week. Of course for med-surg we are supposed to study 5 hours per credit (15 hours per week). The good thing is that some classes don't require as much studying.
  14. by   studentnurse74
    Quote from RN_N_05
    At my school they tell us 2-3 hours per course credit hour. Since most courses are 3 credit hours and generally 5 classes that means about 30 hours of studying per week. Of course for med-surg we are supposed to study 5 hours per credit (15 hours per week). The good thing is that some classes don't require as much studying.

    I guess it would depend on what you're taking. I'm still in pre-reqs, but I know I spend WAY more time on physiology than say, psychology.

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