Higher Learning is very hard to understand

  1. 5
    As I read through many of these posts, I see how some are really knocking some schools because of "transferring". I then noticed that a lot are because the student received an AAS from a tech school. It's important that it is understood what the difference is between an AAS, AS, BSN, etc. when transferring. When going for your BSN, for instance, many classes at MCI do not transfer because it is an AAS, a degree designed to get you into the field with a little less general education credits. It's not "blasphemy" or "incredulous" that some classes don't transfer- you didnt take them! For instance in AAS, you may only take English 1, BIO 101, PSY 101, but for an AS you would take English 1 AND 2, Bio 101 AND 102, Psy 101 AND 102. I'm not saying either is better or worse, but please at least ask the questions and do some research before trying to put everything on blast.
  2. 2,555 Visits
    Find Similar Topics
  3. 22 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    I understand higher learning just fine, the OP - not so much.

    I'm sure this is just me being slow but more detail is needed please?
    Last edit by Crazed on Jan 20, '13
  5. 1
    Im not sure I follow what the first responder is asking for in "more info needed"- My point is that I saw a lot of people putting schools on blast without truly understanding how the degree system works. I thought the post was quite clear - I'm not sure what more info you need as this was not a question, rather a topic. An AAS is not the same as an ADS, therefore its more difficult when transferring to a BSc program.
    loriangel14 likes this.
  6. 2
    Well then...

    Thanks for sharing!
    zoe92 and x_factor like this.
  7. 1
    Lol thanks! I thought it was unfair to bash every school without attending it. There is enough consumer information out there to make an informed decision, so the burden lies on us to do the research School is hard, as every nurse knows... no matter where you go..
    Hygiene Queen likes this.
  8. 0
    All right.
  9. 0
    Quote from NurseGuyBri
    As I read through many of these posts, I see how some are really knocking some schools because of "transferring". I then noticed that a lot are because the student received an AAS from a tech school. It's important that it is understood what the difference is between an AAS, AS, BSN, etc. when transferring. When going for your BSN, for instance, many classes at MCI do not transfer because it is an AAS, a degree designed to get you into the field with a little less general education credits. It's not "blasphemy" or "incredulous" that some classes don't transfer- you didnt take them! For instance in AAS, you may only take English 1, BIO 101, PSY 101, but for an AS you would take English 1 AND 2, Bio 101 AND 102, Psy 101 AND 102. I'm not saying either is better or worse, but please at least ask the questions and do some research before trying to put everything on blast.
    The only thing that ticks me off is a school like mine that doesn't make it clear that they offer two degrees. The AAS degree is a degree with very few prerequisites. I was already in the first semester of the nursing program when the one of the higher ups came in and told us about the AS degree they offer. I could have completed a lot more prerequisites for this degree if I had known that it was offered. Its a real bummer if you transfer to the university because they make you start over on prerequisites if they are not contained in an AS degree. With the AS degree you can transfer in as a junior and continue as if you had attended the first two years at university.

    I'm just curious if this is how it works everywhere? I know this is the situation here in Oklahoma.
  10. 1
    Not in Texas. If you take a class at one schoolmand there is a comparable class at another college, they have to give you credit. Very strange that it doesn't work that way everywhere....
    HM-8404 likes this.
  11. 0
    Basically to transfer to a BSN (Bachelor of Science in Nursing )program as a junior you need to do your prereqs by completing them within an AA (Associate of Arts) degree which is a transfer degree. I got no idea what an AAS is but you wont be able to transfer with that.
    You have 2 options:
    1. Stay at the Community/State College and enroll in pre-nursing AA degree ensuring you do all the prereqs for the BSN program then transfer to that BSN program as a junior.

    2. Do you Prereqs for the ASN (Associate of Science in Nursing, some schools call it ADN) apply to the nursing ASN program at the state/community college, take the NCLEX become an RN then transfer to University to do your RN to BSN program.
  12. 0
    The reason why I was confused as it is not like this in every state. We don't have diploma nurses and our associate credits transfer 100% to BSN schools in the state. The only thing I'll be missing out of my prereqs for my BSN at graduation will be a history and statistics class.

    It's pretty much the same with every local program. In order to apply you must take just about every class listed in the first post.

    I didn't think you could get an RN from a tech school? I suppose it's different in every state?


Top