Help! I need advice!

  1. I hope ya'll can give me some advice - I'm really worried.

    I'm a first semester ADN student scheduled to begin my first clinical rotation next week for Fundamentals. The problem is that 10 days ago I slipped on some ice and broke my arm (distal radial fracture). I discussed this with my instructors and program director last week, to which they said not to worry and that they would work with me. I spoke to the program director again today and this time she told me that I would not be able to go to clinicals and that I would have to withdraw from the program completely. I feel as if my world has turned upside-down and am completely heartbroken. I have worked extremely hard for the last two years to get into this program and have maintained a 4.0 in all prereqs and core courses to date. She cited decreased mobility and strength as the reasons that they would not let me participate. She also mentioned that I would need to be able to chart, but geez, even writing with my nondominant hand my writing is more legible than most Docs. :chuckle

    To some degree I do understand her point of view, but how much strength and mobility do I need to make a bed or give a bedbath? I have mobility in my fingers with no pain, although the cast gets in the way of fine motor skills. I understand in ambulating patients that I will need strength, but shouldn't I be able to get assistance for a couple of weeks until I'm stronger? They preached in theory & lab to get assistance if the patient were too big or you didn't feel as if you could ambulate alone. I'm going to go back to my Dr. on Thursday to see if there are any other options other than a bulky cast, and to find out realistically how much I will be able to lift in the next week or two. Any other advice on how to fight this? I've worked too hard and come too far to give up now!

    Thanks for your help!

    Shenandoah
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   jenrninmi
    Quote from Shenandoah
    I hope ya'll can give me some advice - I'm really worried.

    I'm a first semester ADN student scheduled to begin my first clinical rotation next week for Fundamentals. The problem is that 10 days ago I slipped on some ice and broke my arm (distal radial fracture). I discussed this with my instructors and program director last week, to which they said not to worry and that they would work with me. I spoke to the program director again today and this time she told me that I would not be able to go to clinicals and that I would have to withdraw from the program completely. I feel as if my world has turned upside-down and am completely heartbroken. I have worked extremely hard for the last two years to get into this program and have maintained a 4.0 in all prereqs and core courses to date. She cited decreased mobility and strength as the reasons that they would not let me participate. She also mentioned that I would need to be able to chart, but geez, even writing with my nondominant hand my writing is more legible than most Docs. :chuckle

    To some degree I do understand her point of view, but how much strength and mobility do I need to make a bed or give a bedbath? I have mobility in my fingers with no pain, although the cast gets in the way of fine motor skills. I understand in ambulating patients that I will need strength, but shouldn't I be able to get assistance for a couple of weeks until I'm stronger? They preached in theory & lab to get assistance if the patient were too big or you didn't feel as if you could ambulate alone. I'm going to go back to my Dr. on Thursday to see if there are any other options other than a bulky cast, and to find out realistically how much I will be able to lift in the next week or two. Any other advice on how to fight this? I've worked too hard and come too far to give up now!

    Thanks for your help!

    Shenandoah
    Oh! I'm so sorry! I hope they are able to work with you on this. It's kind of the same thing at my school. We aren't able to take off any clinical time for any reason.
  4. by   Shenandoah
    That's the hard part, Jen. I'm not asking to take any time off. I just want to be able to participate.
  5. by   Achoo!
    That really sucks that they won't work with you. They won't let you observe, then perform the tasks in a few weeks when you are able? I'm sure there are somne things you can do
  6. by   RedSox33RN
    I can't believe they are asking you to quit the program. It does seem a little unfair that they can't make accomodations. What do they do with disabled students that apply? Not everyone who goes to nursing school can lift heavy people without assistance, or even write legibly. And it's not like you'll be in a cast forever - what, about 6-8 weeks? I could see their point if it was a safety issue, but that doesn't seem to be what they're saying.

    Is there any way you can file a formal appeal? So everything is on record? Or maybe get them to agree to give you a spot next semester, since you have worked so hard to get this far?

    I'm sorry about your situation.
  7. by   Shenandoah
    Thanks or the replies. Unfortunately, they won't let me observe for the first week or so and then do my skills. I was told that this was unacceptable, as clinicals are a hands on experience.

    WannaBE, that's a good point about disabled students. I'll have to look at the school's policy.

    If this is not resolved to my satisfaction after my Dr.'s appt., I will go to the dean and file a formal complaint if necessary. My clinical instructor left me a voice mail last night, so I will be calling her first thing to get her take on this.

    Thanks for all your responses!

    Shenandoah
  8. by   colleen10
    Hi Shenandoah,

    First, I am so sorry about your predicament.

    I am a second semester nursing student and at the beginning of last semester (our first semester of real nursing school) a fellow classmate of mine slipped and fell in her entry way to her home in about the 2nd or 3rd week of class. She broke her arm, both ulna and radial bones and several bones in her wrist. It was a very serious farcture, resulting in some nerve damage and pins in her arm and wrist.

    She had to have surgery but the Dr. was able to put on a type of air cast so that she had more mobility. She spoke with the Doctor who told her he saw no reason for her to discontinue the nursing program because although she did have to be careful and not attempt to lift anything heavy with her broken arm she did have use of it.

    She came back to lab class the following week and our instructor told her that she needed to speak with the dean of our nursing department before she would allow her to continue. So, my classmate went to meet with the dean right then and there who told her she may continue in the program. A day or so later she received a call from the Dean who informs her she cannot continue in the program and that she must drop immediately. Apparently, the clinical instructor was concerned that our classmate would not be able to safely assist the elderly residents we were working with. She was also concerned that in an attempt to perform a skill or assist a resident that she would reinjure her arm and therefore did not want her to continue until she was completely healed.

    She had to drop nursing school and is still checking around at other schools to see if she can get in anywhere.

    I really don't know what to tell you. Perhaps if you had a note from you doctor detailing how "un serious" your injury is and when you would be able to have full use of it that would help your case. I think because the semester hasn't even started yet for you, it is easy for them to say "don't worry about it til next semester or next year". Perhaps if it had happened at the end of the semester they would have had to work with you more.

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