G-tube medication question

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    When giving G-tube meds, I am just wondering if all students are required to give one at a time with 10cc of water between meds? Would you give a liquid med (consistency of water) with a crushed med, or would you seperate them as well? Nurses on the floor are laughing because they think this is just rediculous!!:stone
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    Proper administration of meds is one at a time. Mixing any meds together causes chemical changes in the medication- as I was told in nursing school. That being said- some nurses do mix them together for speed and ease of administration.
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    Quote from dcoffee
    When giving G-tube meds, I am just wondering if all students are required to give one at a time with 10cc of water between meds? Would you give a liquid med (consistency of water) with a crushed med, or would you seperate them as well? Nurses on the floor are laughing because they think this is just rediculous!!:stone
    Yes, some may see it as rediculous, but you have to consider a few things. The size of the tube (NG tubes, for example tend to clot easier and are thinner). If it is a GT button, they are usually very thin. I remember opening a capsule filled with little balls and it getting clogged in a tube because they didn't pass through (and no, you're not supposed to open capsules because it defeats it's purpose- but when everyone has been doing it and the pt doesnt take pills, well, I guess you get the point...)

    In peds, the tubes are much smaller, so you really have to be careful. But at the same time you wouldn't want to flush with 10cc between each med (on a small child, as they end up vomiting all the meds you give them). If it is adult, who needs fluid restriction, then that may be too much in between meds.

    As far as mixing them together, not a great idea. If, God forbid the tube gets clotted while you are giving your 'cocktail' of 5 meds, you'll have a big problem figureing out exactly what the pt. got and what he didn't get.
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    I learned how to administer meds to GT patients on a subacute floor. Everyone on my med pass was a GT and my instructor always had me crush the meds together, mix with water (or prune juice), pour it into the ginormous syringe, let gravity take it's course and flush with water. Her reasoning being "You may take them seprately by mouth but when they break down in your stomach there will be nothing stopping them from mixing."
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    Well, you learn something new every day.........

    When I worked in LTC, there was absolutely NO time for giving G/tube meds one......at......a.......time.......we always had at least three or four tube feeders with LOADS of medications, and if we'd taken that much time we'd never have completed our med passes! So what I always did was flush the tube, crush all the pills that could be crushed and give them together with a little water, flush, then give the liquid medications (vitamins, Tylenol etc.) together and flush once more. Otherwise, you tend to end up with this yucky precipitate that looks absolutely disgusting and stinks to high heaven, plus you can easily clog the tube.

    I never had a problem with this method, and I was able to get it done and over with quickly.
  9. 0
    Quote from not now
    I learned how to administer meds to GT patients on a subacute floor. Everyone on my med pass was a GT and my instructor always had me crush the meds together, mix with water (or prune juice), pour it into the ginormous syringe, let gravity take it's course and flush with water. Her reasoning being "You may take them seprately by mouth but when they break down in your stomach there will be nothing stopping them from mixing."
    Can I ask where in California you are in school, in the event I fail this rotation and can't go on?!?!?!?! Are you still a student? What do you think would happen if you failed one clinical rotation where you are/went to school?
  10. 0
    My clinical teachers and the nurses that I've been paired up with have all had me crush them all together...
  11. 0
    Quote from here with me
    My clinical teachers and the nurses that I've been paired up with have all had me crush them all together...
    YOUR FACILITY SHOULD HAVE A P/P ON GIVING MEDS/FLUSH THRU G-TUBE WE CAN MIX MEDS BUT IT IS OUR RESPONSABILITY TO KNOW WHICH ONES ARE COMPATABLE THEN FLUSH WITH 5-10CC OF H2O FOLLOWING
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    In nursing school world, you are supposed to crush the seperately, because some meds don't mix well. I would crush mine, then mix with water, then pour that in, then flush with water. Don't forget that all of those flushes and sorts go into your I/O's! Also don't forget to clean out whatever you were crushing the pills in- you don't want to cross-contaminate another clients meds. All that being said, that's nursing school nursing. I am assuming that in "real" world nursing, they mix them all together and give all together. However, we're taught to do things a certain way in nursing school because there is a scientific reason to do so. -Andrea
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    Quote from aneroo
    in nursing school world, you are supposed to crush the seperately, because some meds don't mix well. i would crush mine, then mix with water, then pour that in, then flush with water. don't forget that all of those flushes and sorts go into your i/o's! also don't forget to clean out whatever you were crushing the pills in- you don't want to cross-contaminate another clients meds. all that being said, that's nursing school nursing. i am assuming that in "real" world nursing, they mix them all together and give all together. however, we're taught to do things a certain way in nursing school because there is a scientific reason to do so. -andrea
    are you saying nursing school is not the real world?!?!?!? :chuckle :chuckle :chuckle :chuckle :chuckle :chuckle :chuckle


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