From First Generation College Student To Nurse - page 2

First generation college students often have educational experiences that greatly differ from those of their classmates who come from more educated families. I was one of those students who had been... Read More

  1. Visit  anotherone profile page
    1
    Also.... my parents didn't know About SATs, college applications, etc. I couldn't count on them for that . I did everything and learned about everything on my own. While in college, I had a pt office job where many employees had hs aged kids. They wound talk about college apps, sats, acts , extra tutoring for that etc. My parents had no clue what a good SAT score was, let alone how and when to register. It is doable for a smart, very motivated teen. But some of their kids definitely had a leg up with their parents proofreading hw , essays, AP class tutoring , reminders about deadlines, etc. These are thing that aren 't available to many and most uneducated people are unaware of. Sometimes I thought/think, "how can people have the same expectations of kids not raised that way". I mean plenty of classmates had parents in jail, drug and alcohol addicts. etc . Sometime I don't think people understand how much of a difference parental involvement can make or do not want to acknowledge it as an advantage. I think I saw a lot classmates do pretty well given their circumstances. I would expect alot more from my own children, simply because I would know more than my parents did, hope I would/will be an involved parent, encourage ap classes, help with hw etc. My parents couldn't really do that.
    TheCommuter likes this.
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  3. Visit  Belle1005 profile page
    0
    Quote from anotherone
    Also.... my parents didn't know About SATs, college applications, etc. I couldn't count on them for that . I did everything and learned about everything on my own. While in college, I had a pt office job where many employees had hs aged kids. They wound talk about college apps, sats, acts , extra tutoring for that etc. My parents had no clue what a good SAT score was, let alone how and when to register. It is doable for a smart, very motivated teen. But some of their kids definitely had a leg up with their parents proofreading hw , essays, AP class tutoring , reminders about deadlines, etc. These are thing that aren 't available to many and most uneducated people are unaware of. Sometimes I thought/think, "how can people have the same expectations of kids not raised that way". I mean plenty of classmates had parents in jail, drug and alcohol addicts. etc . Sometime I don't think people understand how much of a difference parental involvement can make or do not want to acknowledge it as an advantage. I think I saw a lot classmates do pretty well given their circumstances. I would expect alot more from my own children, simply because I would know more than my parents did, hope I would/will be an involved parent, encourage ap classes, help with hw etc. My parents couldn't really do that.
    My parents both went to college but a long time ago. My dad has no idea how financial aid works and didn't want to help me pay for college. My parents never pushed me to do anything, study in high school, study for the SAT, sign up for it, admissions to college, etc. everything I've done I've done it from my own ideas and drive. I am glad I had my high school counselor that suggested AP and honors classes. I was on my own in those classes too. It's almost the opposite situation (mom a teacher, dad a dentist). I think the only advice/help was from my older sister who is a lawyer and wrote me a letter about what to focus on in college. It was really nice. However, my mom has always been my number one fan. Whatever I chose to do, she was always there supporting me.

    I also hope to help my children. Sometimes I was so overwhelmed. It would have been nice to have a little guidance other than my high school counselor. Oh well. I ended up where I wanted so that's all that matters, I guess.
  4. Visit  TheCommuter profile page
    1
    Quote from anotherone
    Also.... my parents didn't know About SATs, college applications, etc. I couldn't count on them for that . I did everything and learned about everything on my own.
    Same here. My parents knew nothing about the SAT, ACT, or the application process. I learned about these things from more knowledgeable classmates, teachers, and my guidance counselor.
    Quote from anotherone
    While in college, I had a pt office job where many employees had hs aged kids. They wound talk about college apps, sats, acts , extra tutoring for that etc. My parents had no clue what a good SAT score was, let alone how and when to register.
    When I attended college prep and honors classes in high school, most of my classmates had highly educated professionals as parents: physicians, attorneys, schoolteachers, superintendents, businessmen, etc. These parents were guiding my classmates, making sure they selected a college prep track, providing advice on careers, funding after-school activities, and reading the SAT score reports. On the other hand, my mother and father were hands-off when it came to these things because they did not know about them.
    Quote from anotherone
    It is doable for a smart, very motivated teen. But some of their kids definitely had a leg up with their parents proofreading hw , essays, AP class tutoring , reminders about deadlines, etc. These are thing that aren 't available to many and most uneducated people are unaware of. Sometimes I thought/think, "how can people have the same expectations of kids not raised that way". I mean plenty of classmates had parents in jail, drug and alcohol addicts. etc .
    I totally agree.
    Quote from anotherone
    Sometime I don't think people understand how much of a difference parental involvement can make or do not want to acknowledge it as an advantage. I think I saw a lot classmates do pretty well given their circumstances. I would expect alot more from my own children, simply because I would know more than my parents did, hope I would/will be an involved parent, encourage ap classes, help with hw etc. My parents couldn't really do that.
    Exactly. Some kids start school (and progress through the system) with unseen home advantages, yet policy makers expect all students to perform at the same level. Some people are in denial about the difference that a home environment can make with regards to school performance.
    anotherone likes this.
  5. Visit  CT Pixie profile page
    1
    I'm 5 months away from being first generation college student graduate...actually I was first generation high school graduate and first generation to attend any form of higher education.

    My mom did the best that she could. She had no knowledge of anything remotely related to college (financial aid, SAT, etc. She did what she could in terms of helping me, always willing to do whatever it was that I needed). Yet, she was always a driving force for me to do excel and do well. She took a job at a local well known University so that I would have the opportunity to attend that school tuition free. (failing to realize that I still needed to be accepted into that University). And while I loved her for doing that, the University she worked for was not a school I really wanted to attend. But it was either that or nothing. I took that and hated every minute of it. Life circumstances happened and I dropped out.v Aways feeling so guilty that she worked at that thankless job for me.

    I did go back to college years later, slowly completing classes needed for the pre-reqs. Anyway..again life happened and I stopped. It wasn't until I was 37 that I went to LPN school, and although it did not get me a college degree, my mom sat beaming in the audience as I graduated with honors. She continues to be a striving force for me as I get closer and closer to walking across the stage to get my college degree. She is very proud of me and my accomplishments. Always telling me that her children getting an education and graduating college was always her dream for us. My sister did not attend college (never stepped foot in a school other than high school). She's more hands on/trade driven. My mom is also very proud of her, but mom is anxiously awaiting the time that she can watch as her 'child' walks and gets that degree.

    Mom never mentioned wishing she had graduated high school or attend attend college. I asked her one day why didn't she and she said she just never had a desire to do it. She was of the generation that a college education was not really needed in order to live a middle class life.

    My mom is 68 years old now and has seen both her children graduate high school, seen 3 of her 4 grandchildren (the 4th is only in 6th grade now) graduate high school, watches as 2 grandchildren currently attending college and of those 2, one is a few classes from graduating, and soon she will see her child graduate college. My hope is she is able to see one of her grandchildren graduate college as well as seeing me get my BSN.

    Mom has been the cheerleader and preacher to the grandchildren how important an education is. She was even the one who finally pursuaded me to go for the RN to BSN.

    So, while my mom never had the opportunity to go to college and was only slightly able to help navigate the process with me, an education was always something she wanted her girls to have.
    anotherone likes this.
  6. Visit  Testa Rosa, RN profile page
    1
    Good article! My own parents were Italian Immigrants both raised on subsistence farms by my grandparents who did not even finish grade school due to WWII. My father finished grade school, and my mother finished high school. Both did English classes once they immigrated here. But still, my parents didn't even understand my report card in grade school. It took me a long time to finish college but am glad I did.
    TheCommuter likes this.
  7. Visit  Belle1005 profile page
    1
    Quote from Testa Rosa, RN
    Good article! My own parents were Italian Immigrants both raised on subsistence farms by my grandparents who did not even finish grade school due to WWII. My father finished grade school, and my mother finished high school. Both did English classes once they immigrated here. But still, my parents didn't even understand my report card in grade school. It took me a long time to finish college but am glad I did.
    I'm amazed by people like you. It's tough to get through it but you all did it with determination.
    Testa Rosa, RN likes this.
  8. Visit  BloomNurseRN profile page
    1
    Thank you for sharing your story!

    While one of my aunts completed college, my mother and father did not. I don't have a relationship with my mother (left when I was 3) but my father always wanted the best for me. He absolutely wanted me to go to college even though he never completed his college education. He passed away in 2002 but I know he would have been so proud of me when I got my Gen. Ed degree in 2011 and that I will be getting my ASN in May 2013. Also, my grandparents and aunts have been a huge support to me. They definitely see how much I love school and am excited to become a nurse.
    TheCommuter likes this.
  9. Visit  NevadaFighter profile page
    1
    Great insight! I thought that my parents were the only ones that refused to fill out a FASFA. I also ended up working a string of dead-end jobs since college was now put on the back-burner. I was living in an abusive situation and there was no way I would be able to support myself living alone and be able to go to college, as well. Congrats, to you.
    TheCommuter likes this.
  10. Visit  maddiem profile page
    1
    I'm also a 1st generation college student. My sister dropped out of high school her sophomore year and I'm my parent's only child who graduated high school. They both don't value education nearly as much as I do. I've been paying for my prerequisite classes with loans and some small grants at the local community college and I'm almost ready to apply to nursing school! I can really relate to your story...Thanks for sharing!
    TheCommuter likes this.
  11. Visit  country mom profile page
    1
    Thank you for writing this. My grandparents had a 6th-grade education. My parents were educated in a 1-room schoolhouse (think Little House on the Prairie.) I was fortunate to have an older brother who blazed the trail for me. The part where your parents refused to provide info for the FAFSA form rang so true for me- I thought my folks where the only ones who did that! They were supportive, but distrustful and unfamiliar with the overall process of the educational system.

    Here's the weird part- we've got the college educations, but I don't foresee that I'll ever be able to amass the finances that my dad did. He was just fortunate enough to live and work in an era of tremendous growth, and the golden age of economic development for the U.S. I don't see that happening in my future. In dad's day kids could drop out of high school, and the next day be on the automotive assembly line making a comfortable middle-class living. Now I've got my fancy-pants degree, a license to practice, and I'm scraping my fingernails to stay in the middle class.
    TheCommuter likes this.


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