Forced wearing of nursing cap. - page 18

I'm a senior registered nursing student and our school has a pinning ceremony to mark the completion of our program. Our class contains about 20% men, equal split of black and white in both... Read More

  1. Visit  NurseOnAMotorcycle profile page
    1
    Quote from kalevra
    Grid-Iron Nursing School? Is that some kind of football & nursing hybrid? When are the play offs?
    See that splatter across my helmet? That's part of the other team...
    kalevra likes this.
  2. Visit  PatMac10,RN profile page
    0
    Quote from NurseOnAMotorcycle

    See that splatter across my helmet? That's part of the other team...
    The other team being the instructors.....? Lol.
  3. Visit  Preying4war profile page
    2
    I'm a chef. Part of my uniform, (like it or not), is the tower hat. It's like wearing a coffee filter on my head. I feel silly walking around with it. But, it's a symbol of a profession that I'm proud to be a part of, and a way to keep hair out of a customers' food. You should view wearing a nurse cap the same way. It's a symbol of nursing, it's original purpose was to keep hair out of a patients' face, & it's simply a part of uniform.
    Personally, I'm a huge proponent of the nurse cap. They make women look sexy. That isn't sexist, misogynistic, or discriminatory.
    I don't buy the arguments of how it keeps falling off, or how it's a bacteria trap.
    The nurse cap was modeled after a nun's habit, (how'd you like to wear one of those?). Like I said before, it was intended as a way to keep long hair out of a patient's face. Then one day, a nurse decided to let her hair touch her collar. Another day, a nurse decided to buck tradition and not wear her hat during her shift. That sparked a revolution, and suddenly nurses everywhere decided they didn't want their caps.
    The nurse cap will (unfortunately) never come back. But to any nurse anywhere who wants to or still wears one, I salute you. I encourage new nurse grads to wear their caps once, then toss them if they so desire.
    Szasz_is_Right and Esme12 like this.
  4. Visit  Stephalump profile page
    1
    Quote from Preying4war
    Personally, I'm a huge proponent of the nurse cap. They make women look sexy. That isn't sexist, misogynistic, or discriminatory.
    .
    Yes it is. It's all of the above. And a little creepy, too.
    HazelLPN likes this.
  5. Visit  Preying4war profile page
    0
    Just so there are no hard feelings, nurses are cool, they do a VERY important job, they deserve respect.
  6. Visit  BrandonLPN profile page
    0
    Quote from Preying4war
    I'm a chef. Part of my uniform, (like it or not), is the tower hat. It's like wearing a coffee filter on my head. I feel silly walking around with it. But, it's a symbol of a profession that I'm proud to be a part of, and a way to keep hair out of a customers' food. You should view wearing a nurse cap the same way. It's a symbol of nursing, it's original purpose was to keep hair out of a patients' face, & it's simply a part of uniform.
    Personally, I'm a huge proponent of the nurse cap. They make women look sexy. That isn't sexist, misogynistic, or discriminatory.
    I don't buy the arguments of how it keeps falling off, or how it's a bacteria trap.
    The nurse cap was modeled after a nun's habit, (how'd you like to wear one of those?). Like I said before, it was intended as a way to keep long hair out of a patient's face. Then one day, a nurse decided to let her hair touch her collar. Another day, a nurse decided to buck tradition and not wear her hat during her shift. That sparked a revolution, and suddenly nurses everywhere decided they didn't want their caps.
    The nurse cap will (unfortunately) never come back. But to any nurse anywhere who wants to or still wears one, I salute you. I encourage new nurse grads to wear their caps once, then toss them if they so desire.
    Okay, you realize there are hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of male nurses, right?


    And most of the old pics of nurses in caps I would not describe as "sexy". "Silly" comes to mind personally, but maybe it's just a generational thing. Even when I was a little kid, nurse caps were already a thing of the past. I associate that look with old, old movies and children's books.
  7. Visit  s.marie333 profile page
    3
    Quote from netglow
    Hey OP, I declined the pictures. What would I want a picture for??? I dunno. I'm a grown up, I'm not going to pass them around to relatives like I did when I was in gradeschool, what the??

    I didn't buy a pin. I have a sorority pin from my first college stint (again, I've grown up since). Don't know where any of my sorority stuff is.

    I went to our pinning which I also thought was a left over from childhood. Turns out 8 other classmates didn't go, I just thought I'd need to so I could be assured of a reference letter or two - felt like a fool. No party hats require there. But they were for the pictures.

    I paid for a degee. I don't need to do the silly stuff. There was a college-wide formal graduation for people to go to anyway, I didn't go to that.

    I am a second degree nurse. Just done with college wasting my time and money.

    I don't think a pinning ceremony should be considered "silly" or something that you should feel foolish about. It is to honor the graduating students and gives them a right of passage into nursing. It has been a tradition for over a 1,000 years. A college-wide formal graduation is not even personal in my opinion. The pinning ceremony is intimate, with your classmates, teachers, and family. Maybe since you've already "been there, done that" with another degree, you don't care, but to me, I am a 21 year old who will be graduating with my first college degree and I am very proud of myself and want others to recognize my accomplishments.
    Tinker88, Szasz_is_Right, and Sun0408 like this.
  8. Visit  brillohead profile page
    0
    Quote from s.marie333

    I don't think a pinning ceremony should be considered "silly" or something that you should feel foolish about. It is to honor the graduating students and gives them a right of passage into nursing. It has been a tradition for over a 1,000 years. A college-wide formal graduation is not even personal in my opinion. The pinning ceremony is intimate, with your classmates, teachers, and family. Maybe since you've already "been there, done that" with another degree, you don't care, but to me, I am a 21 year old who will be graduating with my first college degree and I am very proud of myself and want others to recognize my accomplishments.
    What have you been smoking? How can the pinning ceremony be a1000-year-old tradition when nursing school hasn't even existed for a fraction of that long? ? ?
  9. Visit  Jory profile page
    1
    There are certain things that are proper in this world. For example, it is not proper for a woman to wear pants to a "black tie" event, no matter how dressy they are.

    You have never seen "wedding pants".

    A girl I graduated from high school with, was a lesbian. She was told to wear a dress under her gown or not walk through the ceremony...I agreed with the decision.

    The pinning ceremony is optional. You can always choose to skip it. There will be many things in your career where you will be in the minority opinion. It's a cap, it won't kill you.

    Sexism and tradition is not the same thing. They are trying to bring dignity to the ceremony by having both genders the same. It wouldn't be fair to everyone else for you to be the lone stand out.
    Szasz_is_Right likes this.
  10. Visit  weemsp profile page
    1
    Quote from Kooky Korky
    The cap is definitely sexist and discriminatory. Get a lawyer.


    If she feels strongly enough about being discriminated against, get a lawyer and go for the jugular.
    * Snigger Snigger*

    Is this really something to litigate????!!!

    Lawyer: " Yes, madame...what seems to be the issue?"
    Client: " I'm being sexually discriminated against!!"
    Lawyer: " Interesting....How so?...Tell me everything"
    Client: " They're making me where a nursing cap at my grad, but the men don't have to!"
    Lawyer: " GET OUT!!!"
    Szasz_is_Right likes this.
  11. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    2
    I am a firm believer in tradition. I believe if you respect the traditions you also respect the profession. It shows pride and professionalism. I believe that there needs to be a return to some of the traditions to bolster professionalism. I have always felt that the cap did not make the nurse....although I was very proud of my cap and I still have mine. The loss of these traditions I believe has hurt the profession. Does a police officer graduating from the academy refuse to show up and recessive a badge? NO!

    But that is just my opinion.

    However......I think we need to be respectful to remember to be polite and respectful of each others opinions, thoughts and feelings. It's ok to to disagree as long as we are respectful and polite.

    ps.... technically, nursing began as a practice reserved for men. The first nursing school was established in India in about 250 B.C., and only men were permitted to attend because men were viewed to be more pure than women.
    Jory and Mimi2bRN like this.
  12. Visit  Tinker88 profile page
    0
    Quote from brillohead
    What have you been smoking? How can the pinning ceremony be a1000-year-old tradition when nursing school hasn't even existed for a fraction of that long? ? ?
    OMG! She's not be literal...
  13. Visit  UTHSC_Bound profile page
    4
    Jamie Farr did it...

    Name:  Be5gSle.jpg
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    brillohead, Hygiene Queen, Mimi2bRN, and 1 other like this.

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