Forced wearing of nursing cap. - page 21

by onetiredstudent | 23,157 Views | 253 Comments

I'm a senior registered nursing student and our school has a pinning ceremony to mark the completion of our program. Our class contains about 20% men, equal split of black and white in both genders. I am approaching 50 and... Read More


  1. 2
    Our LPN pinning was mandatory and I would have worn a clown suit if they had made me because I was so happy to be done.
    weemsp and Kandy83 like this.
  2. 0
    Quote from Kooky Korky

    OP apparently doesn't see it as an honor. She sees it as a negative. If men don't have to wear it but she is required to wear it if she wants to be able to be in the ceremony, that is unfair treatment. It is discriminatory and is based on the students' gender. It is, therefore, sex discrimination.

    I am annoyed that OP has not updated us by now.
    Unfortunately, for the OP, the program doesn't base it's dress code decisions on one individual or the minority out of a group. She now has two decisions to make, if the ceremony hasn't already taken place. She can wear it and attend or bot wear it and not attend.
  3. 0
    Wearing of the nursing hat was optional at my pinning, but I wore one both at the pinning and for my pictures. It was in honor of those in my family who are nurses. I am a fourth generation nurse my great grandmother, grandmother, and aunt were all nurses! I now have pictures of all four of us together with the hat on from four different eras. It is really amazing to realize with procedures improve and new techniques and equipment comes along the basic skills of a nurse is the same as what my great grandmother was doing when she worked! It really gives me a strong sense of pride for our heritage as nurses!
  4. 1
    The poll is interesting, I'm shocked that with 150 responses roughly half of the respondents find mandating the cap at the gradation ceremony gender discrimination. I would have thought only a few outliers would have thought so, for it seems like a very extreme point of view IMO. Obviously I don't agree, and personally have found no merit in the arguments presented here supporting that position, but am fascinated nonetheless. It's been an intriguing discussion and I appreciate the thoughtful comments even while I remain unconvinced.
    joanna73 likes this.
  5. 0
    Quote from PatMac10,SN
    the program doesn't base it's dress code decisions on one individual or the minority out of a group.
    Typically males in most RN programs are the minority of the group. Dress codes are adjusted to accommodate them. Hence the reason why males do not wear the cap. I would find it very insulting if males were to be required to wear the cap for graduation ceremony regardless of tradition.
    Last edit by kalevra on Jan 1, '13 : Reason: addition
  6. 1
    I can relate. For our graduation, we were required to wear a dress and cap in order to attend the ceremony, and if we did not attend, our nursing director would not submit our documents to the state for NCLEX application approval. We had to wait a month, then get the documents and file everything on our own if we chose otherwise. We also had a capping ceremony that I didn't want to attend, and the rest of the class did. I asked the director if it was okay for me to wear the male uniform, which was a more gender-neutral pair of white scrubs (zip up top and pants), but she said I would not be permitted to attend and would be delayed in taking my NCLEX. I didn't protest or bring it up again.

    I have never been able to adequately explain why, but dresses make me feel incredibly uncomfortable and humiliated (I cried several times over it). I didn't blame my instructor or anyone else, because no one is responsible for my feelings but me. I just gritted my teeth and got through the ceremony, ducked away from pictures and left immediately thereafter. The only thing more painfully awkward than wearing a dress is trying to justify why I hate it. So, I just got through it, and now it's a distant memory.
    kalevra likes this.
  7. 0
    Quote from kalevra

    Typically males in most RN programs are the minority of the group. Dress codes are adjusted to accommodate them. Hence the reason why males do not wear the cap. I would find it very insulting if males were to be required to wear the cap for graduation ceremony regardless of tradition.
    I meant my above statement in regards to the OPs situation, where voting was implemented. I agree with you that it would be insulting for the makes to have to wear the cap, as it is not a part of a male uniform.
  8. 3
    Quote from nekozuki
    I can relate. For our graduation, we were required to wear a dress and cap in order to attend the ceremony, and if we did not attend, our nursing director would not submit our documents to the state for NCLEX application approval. We had to wait a month, then get the documents and file everything on our own if we chose otherwise. We also had a capping ceremony that I didn't want to attend, and the rest of the class did. I asked the director if it was okay for me to wear the male uniform, which was a more gender-neutral pair of white scrubs (zip up top and pants), but she said I would not be permitted to attend and would be delayed in taking my NCLEX. I didn't protest or bring it up again.

    I have never been able to adequately explain why, but dresses make me feel incredibly uncomfortable and humiliated (I cried several times over it). I didn't blame my instructor or anyone else, because no one is responsible for my feelings but me. I just gritted my teeth and got through the ceremony, ducked away from pictures and left immediately thereafter. The only thing more painfully awkward than wearing a dress is trying to justify why I hate it. So, I just got through it, and now it's a distant memory.
    In my opinion some traditions need to stop. Wearing a foolish cap should not impede your chances of taking the NCLEX. I wonder what her rationale is for delaying paper work. Absolutely asinine for the nursing director to hold your future employment opportunities hostage because she wants women to wear an outdated, archaic, and irrelevant piece of kit.
    joanna73, BrandonLPN, and wooh like this.
  9. 0
    Quote from kalevra

    In my opinion some traditions need to stop. Wearing a foolish cap should not impede your chances of taking the NCLEX. I wonder what her rationale is for delaying paper work. Absolutely asinine for the nursing director to hold your future employment opportunities hostage because she wants women to wear an outdated, archaic, and irrelevant piece of kit.
    It's the same war at my school. All students are required to attend the pinning ceremony in the specified pinning uniform or you will be delayed in taking NCLEX.
  10. 2
    If someone wants to wear a cap to graduation, fine, great. Go for it. But telling all the girl students they MUST wear one is clearly absurd. In the case of the OP, the other female classmates got mad because she "violated" their vote and "ruined" the ceremony. People implied that the cap was some sort of sacred tradition. Oh, please. How can it be a tradition for modern students when 99.9999999% will never, ever wear a cap in their careers? Let's be honest. For these students, it wasn't about the OP "breaking tradition". It was about her ruining their "I'm a princess" group photo moment. And women who care about such things are setting their gender back two generations or so....
    wooh and kalevra like this.


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