Forced wearing of nursing cap. - page 17

by onetiredstudent 22,087 Views | 253 Comments

I'm a senior registered nursing student and our school has a pinning ceremony to mark the completion of our program. Our class contains about 20% men, equal split of black and white in both genders. I am approaching 50 and... Read More


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    I am floored at how many people continue to say "just wear the thing". The bottom line to all of this is the OP felt strongly enough about her belief system, her gender identification, her thought process in the history of the hat for female nurses in a "chaste" role, to ask if it was disctiminatory. As noted above, it not only is the epitome of discrimination, but allowed at a school that accepts federal funding. A nursing hat is not a reflection of anything other than a tradition that is not reflective of most nurses practice. Remember, this is an older student in her second career, so perhaps her thought process is far different than that of a younger student fresh out of high school, or a nurse from "back in the day" that did not have life experience to realize for some, this is a female outward sign of what some could consider subsurvient. We need to support each other in the right to be able to have a choice.
    BrandonLPN and wooh like this.
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    I would have just skipped the ceremony. It was enough of a stretch getting me to buy the pin.
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    Our class voted NOT to wear the traditional white uniform with cap at our pinning. But one student had her heart set on it and wore it anyway. No one had a problem with that. What were we going to do? Lock her out?

    Since we had to graduate with the entire college, we were told NOT to draw attention to ourselves as nursing students. Well, many of us decorated our mortar board with glitter and paint spelling out RN.

    I don't think this is a big deal. I probably would not have worn one though.
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    Quote from Jean Marie46514
    It kinda surprises me, that so many people aren't recognizing that yes, it IS discriminating when a facility is demanding one gender to wear some illogical hat from the past, that does NOT have a positive connotation to many of today's modern professional women,
    to even be allowed to even participate in their pinning,
    but the other gender doesn't have to wear the lil pointy hat.





    .
    I think the faculty (or facility) is only saying that the students have to abide by whatever the vote was. Otherwise, why have a vote?

    I also don't think it is legal discrimination.

    But I still wouldn't wear the cap and I did decorate my mortar board.
  5. 1
    I fail to see how this is sexist in any way.
    x_factor likes this.
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    Quote from wooh
    So if the class voted that all black people in the class had to stand in the back, would we just tell a black person, "Your class voted, you lost."
    Don't be ludicrous. Segregation is a belittling and illegal force that went on for Years. It put one person above another, and deemed the slave as an unintelligent Living thing. So that comparison was in NO WAY justifiable. Also the OP and get other classmates had a voice in the matter, many times oppressed people NEVER did. Under the name of democracy, the class voted, and the OP lost. End if story. She can fight it, that's her right. However I doubt the the program director would budge unless half the class or more had an issue with it. My program voted on it and came to that conclusion.

    Firstly, the wearing cap, especially now-a-days at pinnings, was never meant as a negative sign or derogatory action. It signified that you were a special person. It is meant to be an honor, not a tribulation. Women wear them at pinning for a brief time because of the many of the intelligent people that helped structure the current nursing practice wore those caps, which signified they were trusted healers.
    Last edit by PatMac10,RN on Dec 18, '12
    BlueDevil,DNP and x_factor like this.
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    Quote from jadelpn
    I am floored at how many people continue to say "just wear the thing". The bottom line to all of this is the OP felt strongly enough about her belief system, her gender identification, her thought process in the history of the hat for female nurses in a "chaste" role, to ask if it was disctiminatory. As noted above, it not only is the epitome of discrimination, but allowed at a school that accepts federal funding. A nursing hat is not a reflection of anything other than a tradition that is not reflective of most nurses practice. Remember, this is an older student in her second career, so perhaps her thought process is far different than that of a younger student fresh out of high school, or a nurse from "back in the day" that did not have life experience to realize for some, this is a female outward sign of what some could consider subsurvient. We need to support each other in the right to be able to have a choice.

    The point is that there are too many other more important issues at hand to worry about wearing a cap for a short passage of time. Wearing that hat is meant to be an honor, not derogatory action. The women who truly shaped nursing into to what it is today, many of them wore that hat..

    My perfectly honest truthful opinion, because that's what the OP ask for,is to just not go if you can't let yourself wear the cap. If the OP really wants to wants to participate in the ceremony, the pull it together for an hour and then call it a day.
    Last edit by PatMac10,RN on Dec 18, '12
    x_factor likes this.
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    Quote from x_factor
    Gotta love it when the "discrimination" card is pulled out over something this mundane. It's a hat. Wear it or don't. But out of all the trials and tribulations of nursing school, and a HAT is what puts a kink in your gears? I'd just be happy I'm graduating, happy I made it through. I'd probably do a backflip across the stage while wearing a chicken suit if they asked me to, just to know that my journey was finally complete and I was graduating. Something as absurd as wearing a hat or not would not even begin to put a damper on my happiness to be graduating. I'd wear it with a smile.

    It's a hat. It's just not that serious.
    Praise!
    x_factor likes this.
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    We share different opinions on this issue, clearly. No one is right or wrong. For some (including myself), although the cap is a respected symbol, I'm still not in favour of wearing one. I've always been more of a tomboy, so that is part of my reason. The other is this: in principle, I should have the right to say no to the cap. In fact, had it been mandatory at my grad, I wouldn't have attended. I would have requested the school mail my degree. Thankfully, no one wears the cap anymore for grad where I live, and they haven't for years, so I don't give it a thought.
    BrandonLPN and malamud69 like this.
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    Jeez...what year are we living in? The last time it seemed nurses wore caps was Florence Nightingale days??? Oh...I remeber they wore them in "One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest."
    joanna73 likes this.


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