For students that are undecided between RN/PA - page 7

I wanted to let anyone that is considering PA vs NP or RN know that I have experienced a semester of nursing classes, and found that the curicculum did not match my expectations nor seem appropriate... Read More

  1. by   Peeps Mcarthur
    From Rena
    and if you detested the psychosocial aspects so much in the nursing program, what makes you think you'll like it any better in a PA program?
    Very good question,
    I don't think a PA program will stress the psychosocial impact, as nursing does. The medical model is more interested in treating disease. I also don't think I'll see it in the context of an etiology unless it's used in differential diagnosis in the case of a possible genetic predispositon, like an anemic African-American, or a patient from Laos with bloody sputum.

    see, your godlyness is showing.

    Avert your eyes!!..................Do not look at me directly heathen!! :chuckle

    Anyhoo, I don't think psychosocial, and medical issues will get the same amount of content. I don't think it's possible in any program, whether nursing or otherwise to thoroughly coverboth contexts in that timeframe. One of those contexts has to lose out space to the other. I think the content of the respective courses will follow the job description for which they are training.
  2. by   Glad2behere
    Am I missing something here? Does it really matter? Both the NP and the PA are responses of the free market system trying to fill a gap in healthcare initiated by low numbers of FPs in rural areas. It will continue because they are both economically feasible. Just as it is beginning to spill over into ER's. Both have mechanisms and advantages over the other and as time passes I expect the comparison will be nil betweenst the two. PA's will eventually have to seek more autonomy and freedom from MDs and MDs will have to give it to prevent NPs from taking over market share. As for me, I don't really feel anyone has been mean or ill spirited or arrogant on either side, but I do recall by GPA taking a nosedive when I entered nursing school...Geez, some of the questions those instructors could ask blew me away!
  3. by   Doctora2010
    wow!! i read almost every post in this blog and i think i'm more confused than i was before. i'm new at this and i apologize if i say something that sounds inappropriate to any of the members of this blog!
    well, i will be graduating soon with an aa in science and my ultimate goal is to become a pa. need some advise...i am not sure if i should go straight for my bs or get my 4 yrs in nursing and then apply for a pa program. here in nc you have to have a bachelor's in order to apply for a pa program so i really don't know what to do....i was thinking about the nursing route because i will get the experience that a pa requires and plus if i want to apply for pa program i have to have 1000hrs of patient care and experience in a hospital!!! well, that threw me off since i do not have experience in patient care whatsoever!! i'm kind of confused any comments will help...tnks!
  4. by   MaryEMT
    I was setting myself up for a career as a PA. I have my BS in Biology and I will be starting an ABSN program in the fall. In speaking with my friend who is an RN I would say I definately have much more of a science background. Be aware that you will not get all of the prereqs. necessary for PA school in a nursing curriculum (Although I'm not sure what your AA covered so maybe you already have them). That being said it really is an individual decision. I liked the nursing philosophy better so I'm pursuing this course and will probably go on to become an FNP/CNM. I like that I have the background in science and will also gain nursing skills. I was able to become an EMT-B and got a lot of patient care hours that way and became familiar with medical terminology, patient care etc...so that is an option for patient care experience if you decide to not pursue the BSN specifically.
  5. by   kbm318
    i read the first 2 pages and the last page and in all honesty you say you aren't trying to discourage people from nursing but yet you are CONSTANTLY saying how much better a PA is than a NP or a nurse. so quit complaining if you don't like the nursing way don't do it simple as that and quit complaining about it on a NURSING forum ... just my
  6. by   guiltysins
    Quote from doctora2010
    wow!! i read almost every post in this blog and i think i'm more confused than i was before. i'm new at this and i apologize if i say something that sounds inappropriate to any of the members of this blog!
    well, i will be graduating soon with an aa in science and my ultimate goal is to become a pa. need some advise...i am not sure if i should go straight for my bs or get my 4 yrs in nursing and then apply for a pa program. here in nc you have to have a bachelor's in order to apply for a pa program so i really don't know what to do....i was thinking about the nursing route because i will get the experience that a pa requires and plus if i want to apply for pa program i have to have 1000hrs of patient care and experience in a hospital!!! well, that threw me off since i do not have experience in patient care whatsoever!! i'm kind of confused any comments will help...tnks!
    wow really? the school that i'm going to now for nursing has a 4 year pa program and you don't have to have a bachelor's degree already. maybe because it's 4 year instead of the traditional 2 year? it does require 500 hours of direct patient care which seems pretty difficult for someone to get. the rigors of the program are on the same level of our nursing, respiratory care, pharmacy and occupational therapy programs. hmm weird i guess.
  7. by   HaleyDawn
    [QUOTE=Peeps Mcarthur;293641]Taken from the Maryland Board of Nursing website

    B. Before a nurse practitioner may practice he shall:


    (1) Obtain certification under these regulations;

    (2) Enter into a written agreement with a physician whereby the physician on a regularly-scheduled basis shall:

    Read:supervise



    This is not true in all places. there are many states that allow NP's to practice on their own. So yes, where you live an NP cannot practice on their own and that is quite unfortunate.

    I also want to say that a nurse cares for the whole person not just the disease, and thus NP's are more holistic in their approach to care. If you really enjoy the science aspect then maybe PA that is the route for you. However it is important to remember that no matter what you are dealing with a WHOLE person not just a disease.
    Last edit by HaleyDawn on May 19, '10 : Reason: additions
  8. by   tothc2
    I noticed how many times people were commenting that a PA is "under" a physician's license...

    That is simply not true. A PA has his or her own license and is in no way under the physician's license. Just as a PA has to have his or her own DEA # rather than using the Physician's. I think there are a lot of common misconceptions on both sides. I have a BS in Molecular Biology and a BSN but I'm going to go for the PA. I seriously considered NP but I found the PA to be a much better fit for me.

    Everyone seriously needs to work together. It's a little ridiculous sometimes the pettiness we all show.
  9. by   %63theend
    Quote from Peeps Mcarthur
    Zoe,
    I'm not trying to discourage anybody from nursing. I'm trying to encourage those people that are not sure.
    A few quickies:
    NPs must get signed-off by an MD. They do not perform independently of the physician.

    I know of no RN programs that require organic chem or calculus. I do know of a BSN program that requires a semester of organic chem though. I however do not know of any PA programs that do not require these as minnimum standards.

    I wonder if the PA program you are referring to is even accredited. It has been pointed out that nursing and medicine are not the same. Why would you be allowed to clep into a program of medicine?





    Yes, but not in the medical model. The two are philisophicaly opposed. Even though a nursing degree is used as a prerequisite there is no medical model from which to draw from.

    Therefore..........invalid.
    This thread is crazy old and just happened to come up when I googled something. But I thought I'd reply anyway! Who cares about the organic chem and calculus requirements LOL! I took organic chem and statistics for my BSN. Big whoop. One day while I was taking organic chem I had an OB appt. I took in my books to study. My OB asked what I was studying and I told him. He looked and smiled and said he vaguely recalled that stuff. We talked a little about it and I asked him some questions and he couldn't recall enough to tell me. Organic chem is interesting (I got above a 100 in that class) and it is fun but it is not relevant to what a dr. does on a daily basis OR what an NP or a PA does.

close