for BSN students

  1. I am currently at a CC and not happy with the program and I am considering going to a 4 yr university in the area instead. Can you tell me more of what you do in the 4 year programs. I've been told there is more concentration on administrative duties than clinical, more papers to write and not enough hands on. Can you please give me your opinions. Thank you.
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  2. 23 Comments

  3. by   nadia562002
    BSN students get the best education. We get more of the theoretical base for things rather then more clinical. I dont believe that we necessarily get much less clinical though. I had one nurse manager who told me that BSN prepared nurses tend to do better because we have the broader theory then the specific technical skills. Moreover, it seems to me that the BSN route gives you more opportunity for advancement and the time in school is only a little more then the ADN program. So why not go all the way the first time? It is harder to go down the ADN route then to BSN then grad school and so on.
  4. by   stillsmilin
    I am a senior in a BSN program. I began my prereqs at a comm. college, but when I realized I had to take a year to finish them before I could apply to upper div., I decided to go an extra year for the BSN. I believe the biggest difference is that the prereqs are more extensive. Once in upper division, the clinical time where I'm at is about the same as the ADN programs. However, there is more of a focus on management in the BSN program as well as preparation for graduate work. Many of my classmates intend to continue on as NPs or CNRAs, etc.

    Hope I helped answer some of your questions!
  5. by   LeesieBug
    In our area, the myth about ADN's providing more hands- on and clinical time is simply not true. Our BSN program is very hands- on, and actually has more clinical time. However, I know that this is not the case with every school (it is important to evaluate each school's program individually). While BOTH programs do a great job at preparing competent RN's, I chose BSN because it will only take one year more to complete than the ADN (the ADN takes a minimum of 3 years because of all the pre-reqs), and also because the BSN prepares nurses to enter community health, which is my area of interest.

    I also felt the BSN program was a better fit for me because I am no spring chicken, and I was afraid if I did ADN I would never get a chance to go back for my BSN! Plus, I have three kids and with the BSN program we get summers off. The ADN goes all summer.

    I also think the phrase "more concentration on administrative duties than clinical", one that many people like to use when describing BSN programs, is misleading. Just because the program includes these things does not mean that that is the focus. Most RN programs, regardless of degree level, have the same focus....to prepare competent, skilled nurses to enter the work force.
  6. by   MishlB
    Originally posted by nadia562002
    BSN students get the best education. We get more of the theoretical base for things rather then more clinical. I dont believe that we necessarily get much less clinical though. I had one nurse manager who told me that BSN prepared nurses tend to do better because we have the broader theory then the specific technical skills. Moreover, it seems to me that the BSN route gives you more opportunity for advancement and the time in school is only a little more then the ADN program. So why not go all the way the first time? It is harder to go down the ADN route then to BSN then grad school and so on.
    Here we go again....
  7. by   nursbee04
    "BSN students get the best education"

    I'm sorry, but I didn't like that post. To say that BSN's get the "best education" is like saying that BSN's are the best nurses. Maybe you didn't mean it in that way, but that's how it sounds. As for ADN being the harder road, maybe it is to you, but not everyone can afford a BSN education right off. I am currently in an ADN program on an academic scholarship, and plan on getting a job as an RN, then working towards my BSN. This was the easiest path FOR ME.

    sczccdw - from what I hear in my area, there is really not that much of a difference in clinical time. Maybe you should contact the Dean of Nursing at the school and let her/him help you with your concerns.

    No flame intended here
  8. by   Ortho_RN
    Oh boy..
  9. by   Nurse Ratched
    Flame suits on.

    OK - as those of you who have been around for awhile (longer than one week ) know, ASN versus BSN threads here will only end in bloodshed, cybermaiming, and death. I BEG you not to go there...

    Szccdw, your best hope to get the most relevant information for you is probably to get breakdowns of the core curriculae from each school and compare.

    However you go about it, you are a nurse when you are done, and it will be a source of great pride and achievement for you. Go for it!
  10. by   EmeraldNYL
  11. by   dosamigos76
    Isn't it great that we are in a profession where the training is so flexible that it meets so many needs for different people? I am going the ADN route mainly because that is all that is available in our area and hope to continue on to the BSN, but having the different pathways is a real positive for people.
    Cheryl
  12. by   ItsyBitsySpider
    I agree with you nadia.To the original poster--if you have the opporitunity to go straight for your BSN I would say definitely go for it. Obviously there is much more theory in the BSN program but as far as not enough clinical time I would totally disagree.
  13. by   kimmicoobug


    What is considered the "best" by one student, may be absolutely terrible for another. I do not believe that if you go the BSN route you have the best education and become the best nurses. I believe it has to do more with the program, and then more importantly with what works for each individual, be it diploma, ADN, or BSN.
  14. by   Agnus
    You never said why you are unhappy with your current program. Understand that could shed some light on how to answer your question.

    I do not want to get into the ol' ADN vs BSN they both have their mirits.

    Keep in mind it is not necessairly wether it is ADN or BSN. Some ADN schools are better than others and Some BSN are better than others. Lets face it every school has its individual personality so to speak.
    If you are merely finding school hard. Welcome to the real world of nursing.

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