Failed my first test

  1. Here's a little rant of me being kinda upset that I failed my first test in fundamentals by 1 point. I got an 84% and needed an 85% to pass. I would have definitely passed if the testing average requirements weren't so high.

    Who else has a high testing average in nursing school?
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  2. 9 Comments

  3. by   meanmaryjean
    Most schools have higher grading scales. "I would have passed if the average requirements weren't so high" is like saying "I wouldn't be obese if the scales weren't so accurate".
  4. by   OsceanSN2019
    Quote from meanmaryjean
    Most schools have higher grading scales. "I would have passed if the average requirements weren't so high" is like saying "I wouldn't be obese if the scales weren't so accurate".
    I get that, but I still have yet to meet or know a person yet who needs an 85% testing average in nursing school to become an RN.
  5. by   paisling
    Quote from OsceanSN2019
    I get that, but I still have yet to meet or know a person yet who needs an 85% testing average in nursing school to become an RN.
    Roseman requires an A on all tests to pass.
  6. by   waterdrifter
    Quote from meanmaryjean
    Most schools have higher grading scales. "I would have passed if the average requirements weren't so high" is like saying "I wouldn't be obese if the scales weren't so accurate".
    With all due respect, I feel that because you are a nurse with forty years of experience, you could display slightly more compassion towards others, especially the potential future of nursing. OP asked a pretty simple question yet your content really adds nothing of substance to the discussion.
  7. by   waterdrifter
    Our program requires a testing average of 78% or above to pass the quarter and once tests are accounted for and your other assignments have been averaged in, you must have above 78% to pass the course.
  8. by   MsLori615
    I have my first Fund. test this Monday coming up. An 85% is high to be honest, my school at least req. a 77% (C) in order to move forward. Do you get another chance to take it again? I know my program allows 2 tries before you are out the program. If your program does then try again. Don't beat yourself up. If this is something you want to do, then move forward and learn from your mistakes. Sending you good lucks you way!
  9. by   CelticGoddess
    Quote from OsceanSN2019
    I get that, but I still have yet to meet or know a person yet who needs an 85% testing average in nursing school to become an RN.
    My school required an 84% to pass, and that was the low end of a "C". IT's not that uncommon.
  10. by   BSNbeDONE
    Quote from OsceanSN2019
    Here's a little rant of me being kinda upset that I failed my first test in fundamentals by 1 point. I got an 84% and needed an 85% to pass. I would have definitely passed if the testing average requirements weren't so high.

    Who else has a high testing average in nursing school?
    Did you know about this requirement before you enrolled? I had a similar situation with DeVry's placement exam for an Algebra course. I needed an 86, yet received an 84. 80-85 was a C; every exam had to be passed with a B (86-91). Back then, 92 and up was an A. At the time, I didn't know about the % needed and as soon as I just knew I had passed what I believed to be an acceptable point, I stopped devoting as much time on the remaining few problems as I had done with all the rest.

    When the admissions advisor broke the news to me, he pointed out exactly where the requirement was outlined in the instructions; I just didn't bother to read them all the way through. You know what's hilarious now, but wasn't then, it was an open-book test that I failed! Because of knowing that I had this, I blew my test-out attempt. Two carelessly-cocky points cost me hundreds of dollars and 8 weeks of my life.

    I have a med/surg and nurse surveyor background. I've encountered some things that I felt were not right. But in the grand scheme of things, especially if there is transparency with expectations, we don't have to be where we are. The patients who are chronic complainers about certain hospitals can always choose to go to the hospital down the street. Or in reference to admission charges that I thought were outrageous to our elderly residents living in community environments during my facility inspections as a surveyor, the fact is, those residents did not have to agree to be admitted to those facilities.

    The college that I attended has had to revamp a lot of things that they were doing because so many students were complaining about this and/or that as soon as things did not go their way (usually a failure). Now, they still complain because of additional requirements that could only help them to pass, but contribute to a delay in anticipated graduation dates.

    My point is, if you knew the requirements (or simply failed to read them thoroughly like I did), I wouldn't express my disappointments too loudly, especially if I have a couple of years remaining. Changes tend to interfere with a lot of our plans, you know?

    As a nurse, you will have to explain to many a patient about cut-off periods, especially when it comes to those ever-so-coveted narcotics. At least now, you have something that you can relate to when the time comes when your patient is calling you everything under the sun as you professionally try to explain that there has to be a stopping point somewhere for safety reasons. It sucks now, but it will make sense later on.

    By the way, I failed my first nursing exam after 27 years of total nursing experience, 3 years post-RN licensure. It was another test-out attempt that cost me 16 weeks and over a grand that time around. (I posted that story on this forum). But humble determination still allowed me to reach my goals. You will, too. Pick your battles very carefully. Back in my nursing day, we were graded on the ability to accept 'constructive criticism'. They are watching and listening even when you think they are nowhere around.
  11. by   imhorsemackerel
    I guess my school's standards were low lol. We needed a 75 in every rotation to pass. But we needed to get at least a 90 in our exit pharm test in order to pass the program. The instructors would always say, "Would you prefer a nurse who knows 75% of their information or 90%?"

    I really hope you nail the rest of your tests, though.

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