Failed dosage calc test and feeling like a failure.

  1. I failed my nursing dosage exam that we need a 90 and above to pass. I got an 80 on both attempts. The first time, I messed up the formula and the second time, I didnt read that we needed to round all answers to the tenth. I received an F in the course without even starting it and will have to wait till the fall to retake the class and continue in the program.

    Ive lost all motivation, and cant seem to get out of this depression. I just feel like my life keeps staying the same and when I finally was doing something I love, I failed. I feel like I will never get to be a CRNA with this failure over my head. I dont even know how im going to make it till the fall or even find the motivation.

    Did anyone else fail and now is living their dream as an RN?
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  2. Visit jessang16 profile page

    About jessang16

    Joined: Oct '17; Posts: 36; Likes: 5

    21 Comments

  3. by   CharleeFoxtrot
    Quote from jessang16
    Did anyone else fail and now is living their dream as an RN?
    Yes, me. Distracted by trying to work a full time schedule and not taking it quite seriously enough. Failed out of med math with an 89 (needed a 90) and had to reapply the following fall. In the meantime I studied, had friends tutor me and came back and kicked it in the ***.
  4. by   jessang16
    Quote from CharleeFoxtrot
    Yes, me. Distracted by trying to work a full time schedule and not taking it quite seriously enough. Failed out of med math with an 89 (needed a 90) and had to reapply the following fall. In the meantime I studied, had friends tutor me and came back and kicked it in the ***.
    Failed by one point!! Are you an RN now? How did you motivate yourself during that year to come back?
  5. by   Grobyc82
    I have not applied for CRNA but I'm not new to the struggles of dealing with exams. Just keep your head up high and not let it bog you down. If the will power is there, you'll find a way to get through it. If not, then there are worse things in life, believe me. Have some perspective and think positive.
  6. by   ItsThatJenGirl
    It's just one small back-step in your journey forward. We all have them in different ways. I'm sorry you failed and I hope that you kick serious butt next time.
  7. by   bjwojcik
    Hi. Sorry you are having trouble with dosage calculations. I have taught this subject and really think it is easier to do these problems without formulas. It all boils do to this. You are given one set of units and asked to change them into different units using ratios as your tools. If you go to my topic Master your drug calculations BEFORE you get to nursing school and look under the comments you will see a pdf called dosage calculations. Let me know if I can help.
    Brad
  8. by   Meriwhen
    Quote from jessang16
    Failed by one point!! Are you an RN now? How did you motivate yourself during that year to come back?
    That's nursing school for you--a lot of them don't believe in rounding grades up or letting those at the very edge of passing slide across. If 90 is the grade required to pass, 89, 89.5 and 89.9 would all be considered failing. And yes, nowadays there are pharmacists and computers to do all the calculation grunt work...but they can make mistakes. Nor are they there are 0300 to help you calculate the amount of medication to give stat to someone that is coding.

    Let yourself mourn for a day or so. It's OK to be sad, frustrated, disappointed, whatever you are feeling.

    Then figure out where your weakness(es) are. You pointed out a few of them to start. You weren't sure of a formula (not sure which one as you didn't mention specifics) so make it a point to master that formula.

    You also said you didn't read the instructions, so now make it a point to read the instructions thoroughly, underline or highlight any special things you need to know...and then reread the instructions again to make sure you really got it. It's easy to overlook a key piece of info...I've done it, most everyone has done it. We're human, after all.

    If you can, see if someone who passed the class is willing to help you out. Also consider getting a med calculation workbook and/or looking up med calculation problems online and practice, practice, practice. The more calculation questions you practice, the more comfortable you will feel with them.

    This will stop you from becoming a nurse only if you let it. You don't have to let it. You can do this.

    Best of luck.
    Last edit by Meriwhen on Apr 1
  9. by   Meriwhen
    And merged duplicate threads
  10. by   CharleeFoxtrot
    Quote from jessang16
    Failed by one point!! Are you an RN now? How did you motivate yourself during that year to come back?
    I spent some time beating myself up then decided that wasn't working so I just went forward. Won't say that I wasn't terrified when I went back, and I trembled before every single test in Med Math but I did it. As I said, I got tutored in math (in general) and studied formulas while I was not in the program
  11. by   jessang16
    Quote from Meriwhen
    And merged duplicate threads
    How do I delete one??? I didnt see how..? : (
  12. by   ruby_jane
    In nursing school we did pharmacology (with dosage calculations) as the first class over the summer. If you didn't pass with a 90 (meaning, only one patient would have been damaged by your imaginary dosage calc error), you had to wait the whole year to restart. You were very close to passing. You always have to read the directions. I hate to say it but you'll never not be doing dosage calculation....even if it's something as simple as insulin dosing.

    Find a way to study that works for you. Good luck!
  13. by   NeoNatMom
    I got all the way to my 3rd of 4 semesters and failed my OB calc test. I was dismissed, but it doesn't mean your dreams are over. We all make mistakes. Be happy you didn't harm a patient. We learned within the safety of our programs. You will get to your goals, don't give up!!!


    NNM
  14. by   maxthecat
    See if you can find someone to tutor you. Sometimes hearing something explained a different way helps it click. And sometimes other students are the best teachers.

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