EMT training?

  1. just a quick question......Would taking an EMT training course better my chances of getting into nursing school? or any other extra med related courses?
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   nursbee04
    In my program, they decide based on a points system. You get so many points for having finished your general requirements, then points for core requirements, then points for you GPA, etc. I don't know that it would help you get in, but it might give you a valuable knowledge base. I guess it depends on your program. Can you call and ask your program if that would improve you're chances? Good Luck!!
  4. by   RNIAM
    It may or may not depending on the program. Even if it doesn't help you get into the program, it sure can offer some valuable experience.
  5. by   CountrifiedRN
    I took an EMT course before starting my nursing pre-reqs, but it was because I originally wanted to become a paramedic. In my opinion, what you learn in EMT school is valuable, but it is directed at treatment in the field, not in a clinical setting. The only thing so far that has benefitted me from that class before nursing school is having learned how to take a blood pressure and some of the physical assessment. (The nursing assessment is more detailed than an EMT's though)

    I think if you want to take something to help you in your nursing courses (and maybe help you get in, although most schools look at your GPA in your science pre-reqs like anatomy, physiology, microbiology), you should take a CNA course and a medical terminology course. But as nursebee suggested, the best thing would be to call the nursing program and ask them.

    Good luck!
  6. by   Love-A-Nurse
    it will help in your knowledge base but i don't think it will actually admit you to a program alone.

    all the best to you.
  7. by   2banurse
    Like the above posts mentioned, it depends on the nursing program. The application for my ADN program is so short, just the basics, and then they check your transcript. No essay to share why you want to go into the program as well as being able to explain areas you may think would be a deciding factor..i.e. why are you changing your major? It's frustrating, especially when you have to wait four months before finding out if you make the class.

    I'd suggest doing it only if you want to. It most likely won't make a difference in applying. However, if you decide that you want to go into the ER after school, it might speak in your favor when you are looking for your first job.

    Kris
  8. by   onlyaPre-nurse
    Thank you all for your input .As for the Cna course ,I was a cna for about 5 years,so hopefully that will have given me some of my needed exp. in blood pressure,pulse taking,etc....In my local school they do look at passed exp. as well as your personal reasons for wanting to become a nurse and also your emotional stability (that schocked me).but if ya think about it you need to handle a lot of mental,phy,and emotional things as a nurse. thanks agian every one :0)
  9. by   Gromit
    As an Ex EMT/Paramedic, I'd say that the best benefit is that you will be far more comfortable around your patients than your compadres (well, it will ease anxiety around them, but if you have experience in the field, you will be more at ease, since most of that part will not be so new) but will it increase your chances? I sincerely doubt it. All of 'em I've ever heard of (my own school included) admit to the program in order of GPA. If they have openings, and you're next in line, you will be offered the slot.

    Btw, not all schools offer it, so see if yours does: Ask to be put on an 'alternates' list -this was offered at my facility but was never advertised). You would be surprised at how many students just wont show up for class, or drop it at the last moment (odd, since its not so easy to get into the program).

    Oh yeah, I have heard of some schools that don't worry so much about GPA, they do a 'first come, first served' mentality. I find this a little rare, but it DOES happen.

    My advice would be to ask your school HOW it picks candidates, and keep your GPA up.

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