EHR/ Computerized Charting Systems for Students

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    Hi all, I am interested to hear about students' experiences with Educational EHR systems. I swear, it's not for official research, but I am looking to hear students' (or graduates/RNs) perspectives on ones they have used. My school currently uses one (I will not say which one, because I want to hear what you have to say without swaying your opnion), and we are looking to see what other options are out there.

    I'm looking to see if students found it advantageous (did it help prepare you for clinical and real nursing charting in the hospital). Was it realistic? Was it easy to use? Was there support (either from the faculty or from the company itself, ie, tech support)?
    Did you have to pay extra to use it, and did you feel it was worth it?

    For those of you who never had any exposure to EHR (other than minimally in clinical during nursing school) did you find yourself at a disadvantage as a graduate RN?

    Thanks!!
    Blanca R and Joe V like this.
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  3. 6 Comments so far...

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    I am curious...are there many out there? I'm curious to hear what they say and what they may suggest that would help them more....interesting.
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    I've never even heard of an electronic charting system just for practice. I can't see where it would be really beneficial. There are so many different electronic charting systems in use by hospitals around the country, there's really only a small chance you'll end up working at a hospital with the same system. Not to mention, many hospitals/facilities are still using paper charting. I used Cerner at one hospital during clinicals, a different electronic charting when I did clinicals at another hospital, a third program when I did a clinical at an outpatient wound clinic, and then ended up working at a hospital in another state that uses paper charting.

    In general, I think the younger generations tend to have more hands-on experience with computers and technology than older employees, and it's easier for them to navigate and gain proficiency with an electronic system. I think there are much more important things that students should be learning in nursing school then how to use an electronic charting system that they likely will never use again after school.
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    It was completely useless. We only used it 4-5 times and it did not resemble the systems used by local hospitals at all. We spent plenty of time with real-world charting as part of clinical.
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    They do exist, hence the reason for the questioning. My school has used it for 3 semesters now. And there are other ones out there, at least 4-5 that I know of.

    Quote from Ashley, PICU RN
    In general, I think the younger generations tend to have more hands-on experience with computers and technology than older employees, and it's easier for them to navigate and gain proficiency with an electronic system. I think there are much more important things that students should be learning in nursing school then how to use an electronic charting system that they likely will never use again after school.
    Your first statement is true, generally speaking. Many of the students picked up the system faster than the faculty. But you must remember, not every nursing student is 'young'.
    Compare it to the anxiety many students feel when having to take the NCLEX on the computer, if they have only had paper-and-pen (or Scantron) exams. This is the reason many schools have introduced computerized testing in some way.

    And you are correct, they will not use the same system when they graduate. In a four semester program, they will go to four different clinical sites, each one likely having a different EHR system. When you get your first job, you will learn a new system. When you switch jobs, you will likely learn a new system again. It's just the way it is. It's like your cell phone, facebook updates, or even allnurses! We adapt, don't we?

    And it's not just about being computer savvy, it's about what you're documenting. Let's be honest, would you rather write an old, antiquated careplan every week, or do a flowsheet-style document to electronically hand in to your professor? Which seems like more of a valuable tool?
    Last edit by ProfRN4 on Jun 14, '12 : Reason: forgot something
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    Oh, and the other thing is: at my clinical site, they do not allow students to chart. I can chart, it would be under my username, but the only thing we enter are meds given (and maybe I&O, and vitals, depending on the floor). I know this differs from place to place (even within our school, since we go to many different clinical sites).
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