Double Majors

  1. Are any of you doing a double major in Nursing and something entirely different (non-science/math) and not health related?

    I ask because I'm worried about a friend's friend's story of her nursing career "not panning out" and not having anything else to fall back on.... Also, I know that the curriculum is probably all-consuming, but do any of you have time to pursue other intellectual/artistic interests? If you don't, do you feel like you are totally missing out on your other true calling?

    Thanks in advance!
    Last edit by suebird3 on Aug 31, '06
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  2. 9 Comments

  3. by   cathiep
    I'm in my last semester and I can't imagine having to take other classes but I'm required to work at least 24 hours a week by the hospital that is paying for my education. If I didn't have to work maybe but you'd have to be very organized at focused.

    Cathie
  4. by   GeminiTwinRN
    how come suebird3 is editing olivedrab's post?

    i just find that odd.
  5. by   EricJRN
    Quote from leslasic
    how come suebird3 is editing olivedrab's post?

    i just find that odd.
    Leslasic,

    Posts may be edited by moderators for a variety of reasons, most often to keep the messages in compliance with the Allnurses.com Terms of Service.

    Also per the Terms of Service, questions about moderator actions should be sent by PM to the moderator rather than being posted here on the main boards. Thanks.
  6. by   shock-me-sane
    I am doing a double major in psychology. It is what I would consider a soft science though and does involve math (stats, advanced stats, tests and measurements, research methods, etc).

    I love psychology and am considering doing the honors program for it this year. I have finished one year of nursing and have 2 left and only 5 psych classes that I need to complete for the degree. A good chunk of those classes were done before I started the nursing program which I think made it possible.
  7. by   BonnieSc
    I have a BA in the arts field, and am almost done with a BSN. I think that your nursing career will "pan out" UNLESS you decide you don't like it at all, or do something to screw up your licensing (like commit a felony). Even if there's no nursing shortage in your area, you shouldn't have to move too far to find a job.

    I MAKE time to pursue my artistic interests, which are a huge part of my life. It's definitely possible.
  8. by   olivedrab
    Quote from Wendy79
    I think that your nursing career will "pan out" UNLESS you decide you don't like it at all, or do something to screw up your licensing (like commit a felony).

    I MAKE time to pursue my artistic interests
    it wasn't her licensing that got screwed up -- it was her BACK. *ouch*
    also, good to know that you can willfully make the time to pursue outside interests!
  9. by   olivedrab
    Quote from shock-me-sane
    A good chunk of those classes were done before I started the nursing program which I think made it possible.
    thanks for the tip!
  10. by   olivedrab
    Quote from leslasic
    how come suebird3 is editing olivedrab's post?

    i just find that odd.
    i'm very, very sure that it wasn't because i cussed in the post!
    ........because i NEVER do that!
  11. by   BonnieSc
    Quote from olivedrab
    it wasn't her licensing that got screwed up -- it was her BACK. *ouch*
    Ah, good point! I did observe in a nursing "call center" for an HMO and met many, many women who'd been injured and wanted to keep nursing... but they pointed out that most people who go into nursing don't do it so they can spend eight hours sitting at a desk, so it's not for every injured nurse (and back injuries sometimes keep people from sitting at desks, too). Still, it's an option that's out there. So even if something like that happens, you may have career options.

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