Doing Checked off Clinical skills at home?

  1. I need someone's advice on this subject.

    My mother wants my dad to come home to spend the night in a few days and they said that his medicine and food needs to be given through his peg tube.

    They all looked to me to do this, since I am in nursing school. I am heading to 3rd semester in 3 months and I have been checked off in school on giving meds through ng tubes. My teacher always said peg tubes are just the same.

    His nurse at the nursing home is suppose to demonstrate it to make sure I know how this Monday.


    He had a major stroke last year and he is totally dependent. He can talk and everything just fine, but he is paralyzed on his right side and can no longer do things for himself.


    My question is, Can you do clinical skills at home that you have been checked off on?

    However, I was thinking this wasnt a good idea.My teachers always say they like to supervise over us, since we do not have our license to practice.It just doesnt feel right and I have only did the ng tube stuff on a mannequin, not a real person yet. Can someone please give me advice on this?
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  2. 16 Comments

  3. by   JustBeachyNurse
    Do you have a favorite teacher? Ask.
  4. by   akulahawkRN
    I agree that you should ask a favorite and knowledgeable instructor. They'll know the laws in your area regarding providing "basic nursing services" where the "patient" and "care provider" are relatives. There likely will be an exception to nursing codes allowing this but probably will not allow you to be compensated for providing care to a family member. Also the school may have a policy that forbids this without permission even if the State allows it.
  5. by   Rose_Queen
    Would this really be any different than any other family member who has been taught how to give medications via tubes/hang an IV antibiotic/suction/etc?
  6. by   Double-Helix
    You would not be "performing a clinical skill you have been checked off on”. You would be providing care to a family member after receiving education from a registered nurse. The fact that you are in nursing school is irrelevant to your ability to perform PEG tube feeds for your father in his home. Your mother could do it, if she wanted to, as could any other member of your family. Unlicensed family members are taught to provide a wide variety of medical skills in the home environment.
  7. by   AspiringNurse0223
    Many times, nurses or doctors show family members how to treat their loved ones at home (such as in the case you mentioned). If you were not in nursing school, they would probably teach another family member how to use the peg tube. This has been the case for several people I know. So if the nurse shows you how to do it, then you can do it. You don't need a liscence to do it. The nurse at the home would not be showing you if you were not allowed to do it.
  8. by   Here.I.Stand
    the last few comments were my thought as well -- this is a skill that laypeople are taught to do at home all the time. If everyone with a PEG needed a licensed RN/LPN in the home....dang. Heck, a friend of mine had severe hyperemesis gravidarum, and she had a *PICC line* and self-administered IV fluids and antiemetics at home.
  9. by   ItsThatJenGirl
    Quote from Rose_Queen
    Would this really be any different than any other family member who has been taught how to give medications via tubes/hang an IV antibiotic/suction/etc?
    This. I'm not in nursing school yet and my mom had cancer last year. When she was released home she was on tube feeds and still had her trach. I handled her feeds, meds and trach care. Because I was sharing the primary caregiver duties with my dad.
  10. by   curlybirdie
    Thanks everyone for your advice! I plan on going tomorrow to let the RN demonstrate it. I remember most of it from first semester, but I still feel more comfortable going over it with the nurse. My mom is also going,so she will be able to watch and hopefully do it herself. I wont be at home as much,because I work 12-14 hours as a tech at my local hospital right now.
  11. by   caliotter3
    Family members do these things all the time once they have been trained. However, since you are a nursing student, I would definitely get the lowdown from your school first.
  12. by   caliotter3
    Quote from Rose_Queen
    Would this really be any different than any other family member who has been taught how to give medications via tubes/hang an IV antibiotic/suction/etc?
    Only matters if someone in the family were willing to cause a commotion, especially if something were to go wrong. There are people that are like that, family or not.
  13. by   curlybirdie
    Quote from caliotter3
    Only matters if someone in the family were willing to cause a commotion, especially if something were to go wrong. There are people that are like that, family or not.

    This is exactly what I was worried about. My father's side of the family are family members like that. If something went wrong, then they would blame me. If it gets back to my school, I believe that I would be in big trouble.
  14. by   caliotter3
    I am sorry, but based on your last post I would have to advise you against doing this. You are getting a free lesson on one of the not so nice aspects of nursing. Since you are aware of the potential, watch out for yourself. Not to say it would happen, but be careful. Do not put yourself in the position of even having to worry about somebody trying to destroy your nursing career before you get started.

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