Does anyone want to be just a "nurse"? - page 2

Hi all, just curious if anyone is stopping at adn level to be a general nurse. Seems like everyone wants to be a crna or something???... Read More

  1. by   LadyT618
    The thing about it is, these days, even though one might want to stay at the ADN level, the whole BSN vs ADN debate is heating up and from what I hear, I think the ANA would like all nurses to have a BSN, no matter what. I know if I had my choice, I'd probably stick with the ADN, especially if I am open to the same opportunites as my BSN counterpart. In addition, I really don't see the difference between an ADN nurse and a BSN nurse. After all, we all take the same boards. Also at many hospitals, they both start at the same pay.

    But, just to be on the safe side, I'll go on to get my BSN.
    Last edit by LadyT618 on Mar 27, '04
  2. by   athomas91
    first of all - there is no such thing as "just a nurse" you either are - or you aren't....and don't slight others for earning higher degrees...WE ARE STILL NURSES!!!!! CRNA= certified REGISTERED NURSE anesthetist.
  3. by   MandyInMS
    Being a nurse is good enough for me. For all that want more..more power to ya..I'm fine just like I am
  4. by   jenrninmi
    Quote from Nurse_Ben
    Hi all, just curious if anyone is stopping at adn level to be a general nurse. Seems like everyone wants to be a crna or something???
    I this moment, I too am stopping at just being a nurse with the acception of getting my BSN.
  5. by   jenrninmi
    I'm going to assume that what op meant by "just a nurse" was: are you going to stick with bedside nursing or go to something else. People seemed to get really offended by the "just a nurse" statement. Relax people.
  6. by   LadyT618
    Quote from JENRN2BMICHIGAN
    I'm going to assume that what op meant by "just a nurse" was: are you going to stick with bedside nursing or go to something else. People seemed to get really offended by the "just a nurse" statement. Relax people.
    I'd have to agree with JEN!!
  7. by   jenrninmi
    Quote from LadyT618
    I'd have to agree with JEN!!
    Thanks! Wow! That's a first!
  8. by   Achoo!
    I'll more than likely stop at ADN. Then again I thought I'd be happy with my RMA , and 10 years later here I am LOL.
  9. by   NursesRmofun
    Quote from mjlrn97
    Back in '97 when I graduated from my ADN program, I figured I'd go back for a bachelor's within five years. In the meantime, I went from bedside nursing to management to clinical instructor to consultant.....all on my "little" associate's degree. Now I'm back at the bedside (of my own volition) and when I turned 45 earlier this year I finally realized that my lifespan IS finite....and I don't want to waste any of it stressing out over organic chemistry or statistics.

    So yes, I plan to stay "just" a nurse, although I'll probably go into discharge planning when I'm too old to run the floors any more. If there were a four-year program close to where I live, if I weren't still paying off student loans, or if I were more motivated, I'd think about it.......and then I'd go for a master's because I'd want to teach. But there's no real economic incentive to go back---I've nearly doubled my starting wages in 7 years' time as it is---and once all my kids are launched in a few years, I'm not going to want to work full-time any more anyway.........so what on earth would I even DO with an advanced degree?

    This is one of the few true regrets I have about my life so far.....I wish I had started my career earlier, instead of waiting until I was almost 40 years old to get going. But there's no undoing it now, no going back......only forward. And the fact that the foreseeable future does NOT include more formal education is actually OK with me.....after all, being "just a nurse" was what I really wanted all along.
    I agree 100%. I started as a LPN at 31 years old (all because of NOT wanting to take chemistry for the RN program I was looking at at the same college!) It was a regretable decision on my part, looking back....but I had a lack of confidence problem then. I went back for my RN when all the timing was right at age 41 for the A&P, etc. and graduated wiht my AAS/RN at age 44! I am now 45 also. To think of going back to be a BSN now is just too much. I did think about it, but I just knew it would be more than I wanted to do. I am happy with my AAS!
  10. by   fiestynurse
    "Just a nurse" - I hate it when people say that. It is so demeaning. I never hear any other profession refer to themselves in this way.
  11. by   orrnlori
    Quote from fiestynurse
    "Just a nurse" - I hate it when people say that. It is so demeaning. I never hear any other profession refer to themselves in this way.
    Sure they do, doctors do it all the time. Family practice is lower than specialty, specialty is lower than surgeons, general surgeons are lower than neurosurgeons, neuros are lower than heart surgeons, NO ONE is higher than the heart surgeons (at least that's what they think :chuckle ).

    The only people who say just a nurse that I've heard are the nurses higher up the food chain and around and around we go, BSN, MSN, PhD. Yada yada yada. I'm climbing higher so I can get off my feet, not because I have a burning desire to be higher up the food chain. There's no one on the face of the earth in nursing than I respect more than that LPN or ADN working by the bedside. Those who do it are the very very best of the very very wonderful people who are "just nurses". We all know we are more than "just nurses". Don't let others define who you are, especially other nurses. We all work hard. We all deserve the best.
  12. by   Carolanne
    Quote from suzy253
    As a 51 YO freshman student I definitely plan on just an RN. It's been my lifelong ambition and I still can't believe I'm doing it....and succeeding! Quite proud of myself and some of my fellow students, being younger of course, are quite in awe of me themselves. It's been a wonderful experience so far and I look forward to getting my RN (I'm in a diploma school) and getting out there in the real world!
    I'm with you. This school stuff could go on forever and at 44 I've had enough. I've been doing this now for four years part time and I want to apply it and get paid for it! :chuckle I figure I can get a good 20 years in if I start working after graduation. Coincidentally, our Med Surg III instructor told us the other night that our school now requires PHD's for the instructor applicants - this woman is 53 and knows her stuff. She's also very sweet and nice, we love her. Anyway, one could go from RN to BSN to MSN and now places want PHD? Like others have said in reply to this post, nursing pertains to character and committment, and I don't feel so much that it has to do with what initials follow your name.
  13. by   Catma63
    Quote from mjlrn97
    Back in '97 when I graduated from my ADN program, I figured I'd go back for a bachelor's within five years. In the meantime, I went from bedside nursing to management to clinical instructor to consultant.....all on my "little" associate's degree. Now I'm back at the bedside (of my own volition) and when I turned 45 earlier this year I finally realized that my lifespan IS finite....and I don't want to waste any of it stressing out over organic chemistry or statistics.

    So yes, I plan to stay "just" a nurse, although I'll probably go into discharge planning when I'm too old to run the floors any more. If there were a four-year program close to where I live, if I weren't still paying off student loans, or if I were more motivated, I'd think about it.......and then I'd go for a master's because I'd want to teach. But there's no real economic incentive to go back---I've nearly doubled my starting wages in 7 years' time as it is---and once all my kids are launched in a few years, I'm not going to want to work full-time any more anyway.........so what on earth would I even DO with an advanced degree?

    This is one of the few true regrets I have about my life so far.....I wish I had started my career earlier, instead of waiting until I was almost 40 years old to get going. But there's no undoing it now, no going back......only forward. And the fact that the foreseeable future does NOT include more formal education is actually OK with me.....after all, being "just a nurse" was what I really wanted all along.
    Though not a nurse yet, so many of your other words echo mine. Very insightful post; very!

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