Does anyone have these same problems?

  1. First thing: I can't spell well at all. How am I suppose to write all this information down for others to read. Plus you can't scribble something down because at the hospital (where I will be working someday I hope) they are changing over to the computer by the bedside. You punch everything in. It would be great if it had a spell check:chuckle

    Second thing: I live in the country where everyone speaks the same ol country sayings and words. However we are now getting alot of overseas drs and I can't understand a word they are saying. How do you overcome this barrier. It is enough that drs think they are better than the nursing staff but this too. I do not care that they are from overseas just wondering how to understand them?


    Does anyone else have these problems or any ideas how to overcome them?
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  2. 17 Comments

  3. by   PennyLane
    Whenever I can't understand someone with a different accent than mine (could even be from the same country, lol), I just ask them to speak more slowly. Usually works just fine.
  4. by   klone
    Speaking of spelling errors - your sigline is spelled wrong (should be 'future').
  5. by   lisamc1RN
    Words that you use over and over again will become second nature to you once you learn them. Just make sure you learn the proper spelling for the key words and don't sweat the small stuff.

    As for foreign doc's or nurses, etc., I've found that the more time that I spend with someone with an accent, the easier it gets to understand them. My doctor is foreign, and at first I had to ask him to repeat himself. Eeek! As time went on, though, it got easier, and now I rarely have to.
  6. by   PCGrad06
    Thanks see I told you I couldn't spell where the h*** is spell check when you need it :chuckle

    Quote from klone
    Speaking of spelling errors - your sigline is spelled wrong (should be 'future').
  7. by   PCGrad06
    Would that work with a dr? or would it make things worse?



    Quote from PennyLane
    Whenever I can't understand someone with a different accent than mine (could even be from the same country, lol), I just ask them to speak more slowly. Usually works just fine.
  8. by   LPN4Life
    Quote from RNstudent,wife&mom
    Would that work with a dr? or would it make things worse?
    I have had to get someone that works closely with a Doc, to come and help me understand what he is saying, always make sure you understand what they are saying even if they get a bit ticked off.............especially when they write orders, always clarify what you can't read.
  9. by   PCGrad06
    thanks this is some good advice!

    Quote from lpn4life
    i have had to get someone that works closely with a doc, to come and help me understand what he is saying, always make sure you understand what they are saying even if they get a bit ticked off.............especially when they write orders, always clarify what you can't read.
  10. by   EMTtoRN
    Actually what kills me is dr's handwriting!!!!! I HATE picking up patients on an ambulance call from a Dr's office because they always scribble all the IMPORTANT info down and I spend forever deciphering it!!
  11. by   Truly_Blessed
    I have always had a hard time understanding doctors with different accents. I worked at an answering service for several physicians, and countless times I was yelled at and called stupid because I was expected to understand the heavy accent, plus the rapid talking. Asking them to repeat themselves or talk slower ALWAYS made it worse. One even tried to get me fired after I transfered him to another operator because I could not understand anything he was saying, even after he repeated it 4 times, AND I called him sir instead of Dr. Oy! Needless to say, I was always in tears. I don't know how I will handle this when I start working as a nurse. Guess I will have to grow thicker skin.
  12. by   PCGrad06
    I had a feelin' that was about how it would be



    Quote from Truly_Blessed
    I have always had a hard time understanding doctors with different accents. I worked at an answering service for several physicians, and countless times I was yelled at and called stupid because I was expected to understand the heavy accent, plus the rapid talking. Asking them to repeat themselves or talk slower ALWAYS made it worse. One even tried to get me fired after I transfered him to another operator because I could not understand anything he was saying, even after he repeated it 4 times, AND I called him sir instead of Dr. Oy! Needless to say, I was always in tears. I don't know how I will handle this when I start working as a nurse. Guess I will have to grow thicker skin.
  13. by   mauser
    Know you know how all us MT's feel.

    After transcribing hospital reports for 100's of ESL doctors over a 25 year span (and hearing the nurses in the background louder and more clearly than the dictator), no wonder I am ready to move on. I can't wait to ask the doctor to repeat himself (a "no can do" for an online transcriber!!).

    Anyway, you will become accustomed to accents/orders. As with MT, you know what they are SUPPOSED to be saying. Good luck. Spelling also will come.
  14. by   mattsmom81
    Quote from PennyLane
    Whenever I can't understand someone with a different accent than mine (could even be from the same country, lol), I just ask them to speak more slowly. Usually works just fine.
    LOL!~ This is a real challenge today...with all the foreign docs AND the foreign nurses ...and asking them to slow down or repeat can make them touchy with you, unfortunately.

    Here's me frequently:

    Me: Can you repeat that please?
    Foreign doc/nurse: AhhhsidTin Muffin din cudgom
    Me: I'm sorry but I don't understand you. Please repeat more slowly.
    Foreign nurse/doc: (Screaming) Sumatta nuengless!! Sumattatu!

    Somehow I can figure THIS one out and I reply: "Is this what you think you are speaking? English?"

    <sigh>sometimes we go through 3 or 4 nurses before we get an understandable conversation going...it isn't easy out there.

    It takes a strong disposition and a sense of humor to be a nurse today.

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