Diploma or ASN?

  1. Hi there! I have a question and hopefully someone will be able to help me. I need to know what is the difference between a Diploma nurse and an Associate in Nursing. The college that I'm enrolled in it's for Associate in Nursing, but we are considering moving to another state and after checking on the web the different colleges, I came across the words Diploma nursing. I'm very confused. Any help will be appreciated.
    Thanks, Ana
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   Jennerizer
    I may be wrong, but I believe diploma nursing is done through a hospital. You get NO college credit for the time you put into it....meaning if you wanted to pursue an associate's degree or bachelor's degree in nursing...........none of the classes you took through the diploma program would transfer.

    I think eventually they will be phasing out the diploma programs in the future also. If all you want is the RN status, then you can achieve it through a diploma program. If you want to further your education, then going for an associate's degree or bachelor's degree is where your time is better spent.

    Jen
  4. by   2banurse
    I agree with Jen. If it is your intention to go further with your education, then the ASN is the way to go. The positive that I see with the diploma, if RN is your goal, is that you may have a more intensive clinical phase. You will definitely have more hands on.

    Good luck whatever your choice!

    Kris
  5. by   memphispanda
    I am in a diploma program. Diploma programs are hospital affiliated and tend to have an emphasis on clinical experience. It is true that you don't get actual college credit for the classes you take. You can often test out of the college classes that would be required though. Also, many Master's programs only require you to have an RN license and a BA in something to enter, so it doesn't matter where it came from. I called around here to find out if I would be cutting myself off from further education, and it just isn't that way. I speak only for my area though--it could be totally different in other places. Here's a link to the University of Memphis page, at the bottom, it has the requirements for RN to BSN--notice that it doesn't say you have to have an ADN, just an RN. http://nursing.memphis.edu/prospective/
    You could check the BSN programs in your area if you were truly concerned about this option.

    Anyway, I am extremely pleased with my Diploma program. It is hard as heck, but the NCLEX pass rate is above 90% every year, and usually is 100%. We have an excellent loan payback program. I think it was definitely the best choice for me.
  6. by   AnaH
    Thanks!!!!That answered my question. Yes I do plan to go for my bachelors and maybe ( if I'm not to tired of school by then) a masters. So, I guess My best bet will be an ADN.

    Ana
  7. by   oramar
    In Pittsburgh we have several diploma school. Though it is true that at one time you did not get college credit for any diploma school that has changed. Now some of them are affliliated with colleges and the classes transfer. It is different for different places. So I guess that is the problem. There is no set rule. So the potential student has to ask a lot of question.
  8. by   tatianamik
    Originally posted by memphispanda
    Diploma programs are hospital affiliated and tend to have an emphasis on clinical experience.

    Anyway, I am extremely pleased with my Diploma program. It is hard as heck, but the NCLEX pass rate is above 90% every year, and usually is 100%. We have an excellent loan payback program. I think it was definitely the best choice for me.
    Hi, Good to see another Memphian. I'm not a native, but I'm here now.

    I actually go to a hospital affiliated BSN program. It used to be a diploma program, but they worked hard to get it converted to a BSN program and set up thier own college. They tend to teach you toward the policies/procedures of the hospital program you are attending. They are preparing you to work for THEM. In fact where I go they try to put many people on contract as soon as they sign up for financial aid. Up to 5 year contracted to the corporation. I've avoided being contracted so far.

    I have a BS already so it was going to take me the same amount of time to go BSN, ADN or Diploma so I went for the evening/weekend program so I could still work at my job. I want my MSN eventually.

    One thing to look at in a program is the NCLEX pass rate. I don't usually agree with teaching to test, but unfortuantely it is a necessary evil. But to balance that you want to also get a reallistic view of nursing. These points are regardless of if the program is BSN, ADN, or Diploma.
  9. by   memphispanda
    Tatiana--I almost went to that other program because I have a BA already too. I decided against it after a friend of mine went there and didn't like it--I figured she and I were too much alike for me to like it if she didn't. LOL It was going to take me about a year longer there also, and I really didn't have an extra year to spend in school. Anyway, glad to see you here!
  10. by   Pretzlgl
    It's not true that you don't get college credit at all programs. My diploma program was affiliated with a 4 year college - therefore all of my non nursing classes received college credit. (And all transferable to BSN program).

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