Degree confusion

  1. Quick question. I am a few classes shy of my BS in business administration (minors in applied math and project management) but will be starting prereqs. for my nursing program this summer. Is there a difference in the quantity of nursing classes from the AA when compared to the BSN (i.e. is one more comprehensive)?? I can't seem to get a straight answer on this. The reason I ask is that I will be finishing my BS up with my nursing prereqs and would like to have the option of pursuing a MSN. With my AA in nursing and BA in business, will I be at a disadvantage to those with a BSN when it comes to pursuing the MSN? Thanks in advance for any info!
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  2. 9 Comments

  3. by   klone
    My understanding is there is not any more clinical, hands-on training/education between the ADN and the BSN. The difference is that the BSN has more nursing theory classes, administrative classes, as well as a few other prereqs (statistics, for one).
  4. by   orrnlori
    You can't get a straight answer because there is none.

    Depends on the programs in question. The BSN programs in my area have no more total nursing hours than do the ADN programs. They DO have more general education in literature, art, statistics, religion, etc. The RN to BSN programs have a good assortment of higher nursing classes and are much more comprehensive than the start-from-scratch BSN programs.

    There are MSN programs that will not take you unless you have a BSN, doesn't matter if you have 3 other bachelor degrees plus a ADN. There are RN-MSN programs that let you earn your BSN and MSN together. And there are MSN programs that will take a BS or BA in any legitimate area plus an ADN and go through to your MSN. The one thing I've learned in researching nursing education is that one size does NOT fit all and no two BSN or MSN programs are alike. I have found a program that will take a BS plus RN and allow completion of a masters in nursing. But it took months to find it. Good luck wth school. Finish the BS in business, it can't hurt you and you're almost there. You'd make a good candidate for Healthcare Administration studies, MBA, Organizational/HR nursing, etc.
  5. by   Kora0880
    I don't know about other programs, but I am completing BSN currently and they are stressing management, leadership and professional development courses. The program also includes such areas as community nursing, health promotion (alternatice therapies etc.), research courses and statistics. I have spoken to ADN nursing students and these courses are not part of their program. The purpose of BSN programs is to prepare students for advanced degrees if they chose to continue their education, therefore many other areas besides basic nursing clinical classes are emphesized.
  6. by   Animaniacs
    what about in the hospital setting, does and BSN get treated differently than ASN.

    because i'm just assuming , that people will try to put more responsibility to the BSN nurse because they have the BSN and they consider them to have more "theory base knowledge"

    i hope that's not the case. i'm working towars my bsn, and i dont want people to think i'm a know it all, coz i am not. i'm just taking bsn because the difference is only 1 year of extra schooling.
  7. by   mitchsmom
    In Florida the state mandated prereqs are the same for all RN programs (here they are: http://www.fgcu.edu/chp/nursing/bsn-prereqs.html )
    In my BSN program we do have a "Research Methods in Healthcare" and a "Management and Leadership in Healthcare" class and I don't know if the ADN programs have those or not.
    I agree with the others, alot of it just varies from school to school.
  8. by   mitchsmom
    Animaniacs, I don't think anyone would expect more out of you unless you were actually in some kind of position of authority or whatever (beyond a regular staff position). I wouldn't even think most people would realize I was a BSN unless I publicized it, because I think we'll just generally all go by RN in a regular nursing position (correct me if I'm wrong, anyone).
  9. by   Animaniacs
    when i did some volunteer work at the hospital, some RN's had the BSN initials on their ID badge.

    i'm not sure what that is about, thats why i'm curious.
  10. by   angel337
    Quote from Animaniacs
    what about in the hospital setting, does and BSN get treated differently than ASN.

    because i'm just assuming , that people will try to put more responsibility to the BSN nurse because they have the BSN and they consider them to have more "theory base knowledge"

    i hope that's not the case. i'm working towars my bsn, and i dont want people to think i'm a know it all, coz i am not. i'm just taking bsn because the difference is only 1 year of extra schooling.
    first of all, you get a higher degree to advance yourself personally and professionally not to worry about if someone will think you are a know it all. and like someone else said on this board, know one will know you have it unless you publicize it. i am a staff nurse with a bsn and their are very few people who know i have it. why? because it's really know ones business. as long as you are qualified to do the work for the position you are hired that's all that matters. nurses are the only profession that make such a big deal out of a bachelor's degree
  11. by   Kora0880
    Quote from Animaniacs
    because i'm just assuming , that people will try to put more responsibility to the BSN nurse because they have the BSN and they consider them to have more "theory base knowledge"

    i hope that's not the case. i'm working towars my bsn, and i dont want people to think i'm a know it all, coz i am not. i'm just taking bsn because the difference is only 1 year of extra schooling.

    Wow, no offense but that does not sound right. As a nurse you will have a lot of responsibility and with increasing patient:RN ratio and increase in supportive personel which you will have to train, supervise and coordinate your care with, I am not sure what kind of professional example will you set by "just doing your job" and not putting those leadership skills to use. It's because of attitude as this, that RN's job is more stressful than it should be. Be a leader, accept the challanges and prove to others that you can go an extra mile for the patient and for yourself. This means gradually taking on extra responsibilities and growing. It's called continuous education, one of the main elements of this profession

    Good luck

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